• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12

For the purpose of this essay, during the first part we will explore the meaning of discrimination and oppression within society.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

00027057 INTRODUCTION For the purpose of this essay, during the first part we will explore the meaning of discrimination and oppression within society. The importance of anti-discriminatory practice will be discussed followed by an introduction and explanation of the PCS model of analyses devised by Thompson (1993); this is used to highlight discrimination and oppression on three different levels. A specified group of service users will be focussed upon and by using the Thompson PCS model of analyses the different levels of discrimination and oppression they may experience within society will be explored. Finally possible ways of working in partnership and empowering these service users will be discussed. Due to the limited time and word count of this essay it is only possible to begin to touch on this subject, but the foundations for understanding oppression and discrimination with methods of a way forward to an anti-discriminatory practice will be present. 00027057 We live in a supposedly equal society, however it is apparent that our society is only equal in theory, in reality divisions are created by the social status of individuals based on factors such as age, health, income, ethnicity, sexuality and gender. In any society there are differences between people and people are categorised within society by their differences, the three major ways society is divided are class, gender and race. There are however further sub divisions on the basis of other factors such as disability, age and sexual orientation. (Walsh et al, 2000) It is of particular significance society attributes to these differences by defining people and their roles on the basis of differences that individual groups experience oppression and marginalisation, as the power, status and opportunities people have in society are affected by how society defines them. ...read more.

Middle

The Community Care legislation on the structural level covers disability and infirmity in old age it does not consider varying needs and circumstances, such as abuse of older people. There are no statutory requirements in place as for children. (Thompson, 1993) "Images of peoples worth are acted out in service provision. Work with older people is seen as straightforward. It can wait. Childcare is seen as complex and immediate. However both require the same social work skills, present the familiar social work dilemma and require handling of separations, placements and culture." (Preston-Shoot and Agass, 1990, cited in Thompson, 1993, p90) On all three levels ageing is seen as negative, it is an accepted belief that when you reach a certain age you are regarded as past it, this belief is thus institutionalised. An example of this is through the use of comic humour and language, around a birthday celebration, people will joke with each other and call each other names like 'you old fogie', thus implying being old is a problem. Of course no offence is meant to anybody 'its only a joke'. At a cultural level jokes about old age and the use of 00027057 negative language all serve to reinforce negative stereotypes about older people, which are in turn reflected in personal perceptions about old age. (Thompson, 1993) There are many ageist assumptions made about older people, they are often seen as childlike. On a personal and structural level decisions are made for them without consultation, their rights are ignored. For example it may be the view of family members for what ever reason and that of professionals that the individual older person who is struggling to care for them self would be better off in a care home. ...read more.

Conclusion

Which has a negative impact on the level of resources available to many workers within statutory agencies, which is at odds with responding to need in the sensitive and flexible way an empowering practice requires. To pursue the interests of clients and carers within severe resource constraints demands a personal commitment to the values of anti-oppressive practice and the desire to advocate on behalf of those in need. (Hugman & Smith, 1995) Existing social workers may or may not use the PCS model of analyses, but do have a personal responsibility to themselves, other professionals and service users to work in an anti-discriminatory way. The PCS model of analyses is very useful as it provides the individual practitioner with the appropriate tools to identify discrimination and oppression on the different levels within society. This will increase their awareness and enable them to be in a position to enlighten individuals of their oppression; this being done on the personal level which will impact on the structural level. "If the principles of anti-oppressive practice are to move the practitioners thinking beyond agency policy and practices and to make a difference, then they need to invest time and energy in the application of those principles, enabling them to systematically 00027057 analyse situations and think through the action that needs to be taken. Anti-oppressive practice then moves beyond description of the nature of oppression to dynamic and creative ways of working." (Burke, 1998, p238) Social work practice should mean anti-discriminatory practice, which should directly challenge negative stereotypes and assumptions. Social work should help the service users to understand some of the causative factors involved. Giving service users the knowledge and enabling skills to deal with their oppression it can help to dilute the power imbalance of worker client man and woman. 11 10 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. Evaluate the Significance of Socilogy To Understand Social Work Practice.

    Gilleard & Higgs (2000:12) There are many sociological changes that older people have to go through in the latter part of their life. The role of husband or wife may change from that to widow or widower and independent to dependent or interdependent. Some larger companies are introducing courses for people reaching retirement age

  2. Deforestation of the Amazon Rainfores- Humanities Essay

    Some land is bought for small scale farming (small scale agriculture) where there is a local farmer who supplies the surrounding villages and markets food. Whereas huge areas of land are also bought for large scale farming (Industrial agriculture). Where the entire dairy, poultry, fish, crops and live stock are supplied to super markets around the country.

  1. The essay will interpret inequalities in health among the sub-populations of socio-economic class position, ...

    die younger...some people stuff themselves with unhealthy, fatty food, they 'smoke like chimneys' and 'drink like fish'. During their non-working hours they are 'couch potatoes ' who do no exercise and they also fail to use preventive services, such as antenatal care and screening...the range of unhealthy behaviour could be

  2. Racial Discrimination

    Whatever happened to treating others the way you wanted to be treated? I wonder how that lobster man would feel if someone wouldn't let him have food because they thought he was Jewish (whether he was or not). Maybe some people need to experience something before they can actually realize how harmful it really is.

  1. Crime - 'The media portrays ethnic minorities in negative ways', Discuss.

    behave, sometimes the media make it up that ethnic minorities are negative people so they can make a major issue out of it, and sometimes seen as a good story as well, also because UK was originally a white country so most other races are taken to be negative people,

  2. Mateship - origins and meaning

    The mateship has sunk. Don Watson, a column writer rightly said 'Real mateship is not suited to the times in modern Australia' A definitive element of mateship is collectivism. It is an ethos of mutual aid and support, and no more compatible with a creed of self-interest or what today is called aspirationalism than liberalism is with fascism.

  1. Identity Essay

    However, Mukherjee done all with her own choice and therefore takes her citizenship very seriously. The United Nations adds new members almost every year, many 'old nations' now find themselves challenged with 'sub' - nationalisms. It looks more and more likely that there will be a creation of more nationalities

  2. Jessica Yassen's Philosophy of Meaning and Value Plan

    Another view from the modern era was that of Ludwig Wittgenstein. Moore and Bruder (2002) stated that Ludwig used analysis philosophy to derive value. The author leans towards Ludwig's views in the fact that she analyzes everything and believes there is a reason in seeing the true reality.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work