Using "Ebonics" in American Schools. Schools should use only standard English. Ebonics will only hinder students from succeeding in college

Authors Avatar by ripthunder (student)

Schools should use only standard English. Ebonics will only hinder students from succeeding in college and the professional workplace and achieving economic equality.

Language is a series of codes, conventions and protocols that have been developed to successfully transmit a message from the sender to the receiver. In order for communications to work, both the sender and the receiver must understand the code (or language). On a societal level, the entire population should know one dominant language in order to function. In the United States, that is English (American English, to be precise.) 

It is tough enough to master one language, let alone all the dialects. Ebonics is a bastardised form of English (much like "Jouale" is a bastardised form of French in Québec), and should not be given academic attention except maybe as a research subject. By introducing Ebonics in the mix, you are diluting English to a certain degree, and you end up creating a language ghetto because Ebonics is associated largely with hip-hop and gang culture, which evoke negative feelings in much of the "hiring class." In other words, if Ebonics comes out of your mouth instead of standard English, you're less likely to get a good job. If you start with Ebonics, why not teach Spanglish, Cajun, Texan, surfer talk and Geek speak, each of which has its own cultural baggage and adds as much to the expanding English dictionary as hip-hop.

In order for language to work, it has to evolve (and that means introducing new words and new meanings to existing words), but the base code should remain as tight as possible. All this to say that I don't think it's a good idea to teach Ebonics.

Join now!

To put it simply, the question of Ebonics in schools must be addressed appropriately: recognizing it and using contemporary knowledge pertaining to it is vital to altering the erroneous linguistic characteristics of most African Americans, yet teaching it is borderline ridiculous. Regardless of what one may say, African American Vernacular English (AAVE) is merely a variation of Standard English, meaning, despite some noteworthy distinctions, the two dialects are not so impossibly different as to account for the underachieving results of the majority of African-Americans. The problem lies not necessarily in the way they speak per se, but rather in ...

This is a preview of the whole essay