Social Science Final Project- How have the events and issues of the 60s impacted your personal life?

Unit 9 Final Project Unit 9 final Project Krystal McGee Kaplan University Social Science 310-05 Jennifer Worley 22 Jun 2010 ________________ How have the events and issues of the 60s impacted your personal life? I was born in 1960 and although I was young and did not understand a lot of what was going on during those days I gained knowledge and understanding of the times through my parents and basically took on their point of view of the world until I was old enough to understand things for myself. The sixties for me was a time in which the living was easy, food was cheap the stores had penny candy and you could actually go places and leave your door unlocked because no one would dare come into your home besides your neighbors would watch out for you. Despite all the turmoil that was occurring in the 60's I must admit I have never felt the peace of mind and safety I once felt in those days long gone, one reason could have been that I was just too young to understand all that was going on around me. I was brought up in a Christian home where my father was a minister with a strong love for God. Although he had been through his share of racial discrimination he instilled in us love for all people regardless of color. He gave us an everyday example of how we were to be treated as well as how we were to treat others. I remember watching the images of violence on the

  • Word count: 1715
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Group 4 Projects
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Producing an advisory leaflet - I have chosen the transitional period of moving from primary to secondary education for two reasons the first reason is that I am facing this stage in my eldest childs life at the moment,

Contents Page Page 2 Introduction Page 3 Introduction to booklet Page 4 Why I have included the sections I have Page 5 Theory Page 6 Why I did not include certain areas Page 7 & 8 Parents feedback Page 9 Critical evaluation Page 10 Conclusion Page 11 References Appendixes Appendix 1 Booklet Appendix 2 Transition sheet Appendix 3 Blank Questionnaire Appendix 4 Completed questionnaire Appendix 5 Results Introduction This is my report on the production of my transitional booklet and feedback that I received from 6 of the 12 parents I piloted it with. Introduction to booklet I have chosen the transitional period of moving from primary to secondary education for two reasons the first reason is that I am facing this stage in my eldest child's life at the moment, the second reason being is that although secondary schools provide prospectuses they do not offer information on preparing your child for this move neither do the primary schools. I have included a copy of my booklet in appendix 1. Why I have included the sections I have I have chosen things that are important to me as a parent and have also spoken to my son about things that he is worried about. I also spoke to his head and class teacher to see if they could think of things that I could include. After the class session on transition we formed a list of things that we all thought important to mention

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  • Level: International Baccalaureate
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Group 4 Paper 2008

Production and Properties of Paper Papyrus, more commonly known as paper, is used commonly for various purposes. The deceivingly simple object that we come into contact with nearly every day in fact goes through a complex process to become the writing paper that we are so familiar with. Common belief holds that paper always comes from trees, but many non-woody plants are also used. Besides writing paper, we also use paper in the form of containerboards, cotton fiber, tissue, newspaper, and money. The process through which various types of paper are created involves many biological, as well as chemical and physical, aspects. It also has many biological properties that result from its makeup and creation process. The most important ingredient in the creation of paper is cellulose, which is found in plants. Wood from trees is made up of cellulose fibers, which are connected by a natural adhesive substance called lignin. Cellulose is a polysaccharide fiber, with glucose units connected by beta linkages, that usually forms the framework of most cell walls in plants. It is the most abundant organic compound on the planet. Lignin is a complex polymer that is mostly responsible for rigidity and strength in the structure of plants. In order to extract the cellulose, the wood goes through a process called pulping, which can be done either mechanically or chemically. Chemically, the

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  • Level: International Baccalaureate
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Waves and friction

? Aim "To investigate if the performance of a swimmer is affected by the waves occurring in the swimming pool from other swimmers?" Background knowledge A wave is a periodic disturbance whereby energy is conveyed from one place to another in a medium without the transfer of matter. In this experiment of ours the main properties that will affect the swimmer are; Amplitude Wave length and frequency. We say this because the higher the amplitude the more the energy the wav possesses and the aster the frequency the more momentum the wave has at the wave front. Thus with this I mind we hypothesize: "The performance of a swimmer is directly influenced by their interaction with waves" We first got our idea of our investigating after observing the waves produced by a swimmer and a boat. The frontal curved waves caused by the forward thrust of the body and the triangular end waves caused partially by the propellant were always visible. We suspected these waves to have an impact on the body and thus decided to investigate. Due to the hypothetical nature of this experiment, no numerical data was collected. The variables that were considered were: Variables Independent variable > Speed of the swimmer Dependant variable > Force acting on swimmer from other waves Controlled variable > The swimmers Apparatus * Camcorder * 2 Swimmers: Shahbaz Mir and Dennis

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  • Level: International Baccalaureate
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Group 4 project

Electricity: Electrostatics: * Not moving charges. * Material like amber, when rubbed, can move small objects * The technical term is that the 'balloon' or likewise, is electrically charged * There are two types of charge: - positive - & negative * if we are looking at atoms, protons are positively charged and electrons are negatively charged * An object that is not charged is referred to as neutral. * A neutron has no charges * In most situations we don't look at atoms, we look at whole objects * If an object has more electrons that usual it will be negatively charged. * If it has less electrons, it will be positively charged. * In most cases we can use friction and rub electrons from one object to another to charge it. * It is important to note: - electrons do the moving, NOT protons - the charge doesn't last long due to interactions with air - it is not restricted to solids * electrostatic precipitation - in chimneys. Smoke and dust are ionized and stick to the metal plates in a chimney * the basic technique of charging small particles is how photocopiers work Charging an object * can be easy or hard depending on the conductivity of the object. * In a conductor electrons can move very easily. E.g. metals have delocalized electrons that move easily. * In an insulator electrons are NOT free. * Things you can CHARGE are insulators. Charging by

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  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Group 4 Projects
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Environmental Impacts of Bowling in the past and in the future. Originally, bowling balls were made out of lignum vitae, a wood so dense that it would sink in water.

Environmental Impacts of Bowling in the past and in the future The history of bowling is quite long, it is not even certain when or where it started. However looking back in history shows evidence of how the sport has significantly changed over the years. As a result, as the years pass by, changes that may improve bowling also have a huge impact on the environment. Changes can be small things, such as different types of coatings, or bigger things such as different type of balls. Even the smallest change however can have a huge impact on the environment, and as a result it is important to know how bowling affected the environment in the past, and where is it going in the future. Originally, bowling balls were made out of lignum vitae, a wood so dense that it would sink in water. This type of wood comes from a very slow growing tree, which at one point was the most traded hardwood in the world. Although it wasn't entirely because of the bowling industry, the lignum vitae is now an endanger species due to its slow sustainable rate and because many industries, such as bowling, were constantly increasing the demand for this wood. After seeing that the demand for hard wood was driving the lignum vitae to extinction, the bowling industry started making balls out of rubber. Once rubber began to diffuse throughout society, it decrease the amount of harmful impact to the

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  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Group 4 Projects
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homeostasis and sports - experiments measuring the effects of exercise on the body

Aim To Investigate the effect of the game squash on the blood glucose level. Hypothesis - blood glucose level is usually affected by an activity or exertion such as a sport. Squash is a very exerting game and so a lot of glucose is required in providing energy while playing the game. The result is that the blood glucose shall fall. However homeostasis involves positive feedback and negative feedback. In this case , after a fall in the blood glucose level, positive feedback shall work to regulate the blood glucose level , by breaking down glycogen in the liver to glucose. Therefore the original glucose level shall be attained. However blood glucose level can also be influenced by the type of food that an individual has taken preceding the test.this then determines whether positive feedback or negative feedback shall occur Apparatus * A Glucometer kit * Squash rackets * Squash balls * Dettol * Cotton wool * Stopwatch Procedure . samples of blood of 2 volunteers were obtained using a sterilised lancets 2. The blood sample of an individual was then placed on the film that was provided by the glucometer kit 3. The film was inserted in the glucometer slot and the blood glucose level value was read off the screen and recorded 4. step 2 and 3 were repeated for the second volunteer 5. Afterwards, the game squash was started, and immediately the stopwatch too 6.

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  • Level: International Baccalaureate
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age sex pyramids environmental

Age Sex Pyramid ) Developing country: India Current yr: 2008 Population size Crude birth rate Crude death rate Fertility rate Life expectancy Rate of natural increase Doubling time ,148,000,000 22/1000 6/1000 2.8 69 .6% 43.7yrs Total population Male Female 853,724,391 440,668,382 413,056,009 Total population Male Female ,004,124,224 518,116,394 486,007,830 Year 1991 2000 - Expansive population pyramids show larger numbers or percentages of the population in the younger age groups, usually with each age group smaller in size or proportion than the one born before it. These types of pyramids are usually found in populations with very large fertility rates and lower than average life expectancies. The age-sex distributions of Latin American and many Third World countries would probably display expansive population pyramids. Total population Male female ,362,053,154 700,022,547 662,030,607 Total population Male Female ,807,878,574 915,650,957 892,227,617 By the year 2020 - the population of India has exploded, with a massive increase especially in the 0 to 19 age group. Looking at yr 2050 the population seems to be increasing at a decreasing stage. Looking at the figures the total population has increased by about 500 000. 991 2000 2020 2050 Population 853,724,391 ,004,124,224 ,362,053,154 ,807,878,574 Male

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  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Group 4 Projects
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Global Positioning System (GPS)

IB Diploma ITGS Portfolio: Global Positioning System (GPS) Peripheral Use of the System a. Introduction of the Subject Nowadays, the word "maps" are becoming less popular and has evolved into the word "GPS". Simply, the Global Positioning System is a system of satellites and receiving devices used to compute positions on Earth. The information can be used in a three-way communication for use as positioning system. After much evolution of the GPS technology, it is very useful in tracking down an individual- not only humans, but also animals. A tiny modem, attached to their collar, sends out a text message to a mobile phone, PDA, or other two-way wireless device, whenever a pet leaves any predetermined boundaries. Not only is the owner notified, but the receiver gives directions, and even maps, with certain supported mobile phones, for finding the wandering pet. Many mobile phones, PCs or PDAs already have real-time tracking software readily installed in them, making it accessible and easy to operate. PawTRAX(tm) is an example of an online program that allows users to track their pets. Users can enable geo-fences, and follow the pet's movements in real time. b. The IT Background of the subject Since 2001, developers have tried to analyze using the method of instantaneous positioning for continuous access to high-rate data. The first effort was taken by the Orange County

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  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Group 4 Projects
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physics lab report group four project

Data Collection Table (1): the voltage between the plates and current flowing through the circuit as the distance between the plates (placed in the 1:1 mountain soil to water suspension) was varied. Trial Voltage (V) (V) (±0.2V) Current (I) (mA) (±0.01mA) Distance between plates (l) (cm) (±0.5cm) Length of plates (L) (cm) (±0.1cm) Width of plates (W) (cm) (±0.1cm) 5.0 0.04 7.0 5.5 3.5 2 5.0 0.07 4.0 5.5 3.5 3 4.2 0.15 .0 5.5 3.5 Table (2): the voltage between the plates and current flowing through the circuit as the distance between the plates (placed in the 1:1 garden soil to water suspension) was varied. Trial Voltage (V) (V) (±0.2V) Current (I) (mA) (±0.01mA) Distance between plates (l) (cm) (±0.5cm) Length of plates (L) (cm) (±0.1cm) Width of plates (W) (cm) (±0.1cm) 5.0 0.05 6.5 4.0 3.5 2 4.4 0.11 2.5 4.0 3.5 3 3.8 0.17 .0 4.0 3.5 Data Processing and Presentation . Conversion of measurements to SI units Table (3): the voltage between the plates and current flowing through the circuit as the distance between the plates (placed in the mountain soil suspension) was varied. Trial Voltage (V) (V) (±0.2V) Current (I) (A) (±0.00001A) Distance between plates (l) (m) (±0.005m) Length of plates (L) (m) (±0.001cm) Width of plates (W) (m) (±0.1m) 5.0 0.00004

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