TOK speech - Does experience with mathematics influence perception of beauty?

Show video: (1:45 - 4:10) http://www.ted.com/talks/michael_pawlyn_using_nature_s_genius_in_architecture.html V: So, using mathematics to describe and better understand our perception of beauty in nature is not only an interesting endeavour, but one that can help us create beautiful and sustainable designs based on nature. Imagine a solar panel having the same design as the arrangement of leaves in a Fibonacci sequence. Not only would that be visually awesome, it could provide an answer to using solar panels as a main source of energy. Mathematics and nature is all around us, so putting them together in design would make something incredible. A: Although we have discussed at length about mathematics, and how it is beautiful, our high school education does not teach actual mathematics. Our learning consists of arithmetic and computational math. So what right do we have to talk about mathematics and its beauty? Does experience with mathematics influence perception of beauty? Show picture of nature and picture of mathematical formula Ask class which is beautiful, and which is easier to perceive as beautiful. V: There is much beauty in nature, and we can all recognize it without any mathematical training. Mathematical beauty, however, may only be appreciated if one is familiar with its language and if one has enough experience and knowledge to identify it. A: There was a

  • Word count: 1638
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Perception. Factors such as a persons educational background, culture, societal norms and expectations, media, physical senses and life experiences create, shape and build the perceptions and filters from which people view the world.

Perception is an empirical enquiry gained through experience, and because of this, there is no single case where one perceives the world in the same way as another person. When a person experiences any sort of event, filters comes into play, which affect the manner in which the experience and corresponding data are processed by a person. Eventually, a person's conscience is also activated and that, combined with what is perceived through the various filters allows the person to act in whatever manner he sees fit. There are many filters which can affect a person's perception and the filters will vary from person to person. There are, however, various filters that are probably common to most of us: a person's educational background, culture, societal norms and expectations, media, physical senses and life experiences. Education is an especially powerful filter. Not only do people have differing levels of education, but any good education will expose a person to various schools of thought and ways of looking at the world, some of which have their origins in the ancient world and others that reflect the most modern and up-to-date approach to looking at the world around us. When a child is constantly bombarded with the same very narrow minded ways of thinking and perceiving the world around them, they will grow up to be closed-minded, not being open to new ideas and ways of

  • Word count: 1537
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Theory of Knowledge - find the perfect art piece, whether it be play, musical, paintings, or other wise

Sabina Yeasmin Dr. Hall | Period 0 Theory of Knowledge June 11, 2009 Arts Essay: Mary, 1898 I had a mission ahead of me. We all had to face it, everyone in our TOK class. Our mission was to find the perfect art piece, whether it be play, musical, paintings, or other wise. It was May 19 of 2009 and Khalah, Mary, and I decided to go hunt down our targets together. We felt that the most convenient starting place would be Lasalle University Art Museum. We didn't know what to expect, didn't know if it would have our future reference items in there, but we were determined to finish the task as soon as possible. Sure I knew where Lasalle University was, but I had no clue where to go to enter the Art Museum section. It so happened that Kahlah knew how to get there, as she had gone there before to look at the art pieces. It was a very windy day, and we all kept getting dust in our eyes as we walked up the steep hill from Central High School. The walk there was long and painful, but we endured the dirt aiming for our eyes. We just hoped that our mission would be successful by the end of the day to make up for the horrible walk. At the entrance to the museum a man gave us directions to the door of the Art Museum. We followed his directions and knew that we went the right way since the first thing we saw when we opened the door was a painting of monkeys hanging from a pole. We went

  • Word count: 1965
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Is Psychology a Science? According to one of the articles read in class, Is psychology a science? by Ellie Dommett, many suggest that psychology is indeed a science as it uses scientific methods.

Is Psychology a science? According to one of the articles read in class, 'Is psychology a science?' by Ellie Dommett, many suggest that psychology is indeed a science as it uses scientific methods. Psychologists who defend their subject also use this as an argument. Initially, when looking into this question I believed that psychology is a science to some extent; it really depends on what approaches are used in psychology. I would first think that when only biological factors (e.g. hormones in the role of attraction) are used to explain a certain human behaviour, then that would make psychology a science. However, the human mind (especially over the recent years with exposure to media) is too complex to be explained with the Biological Perspective solely. These days, the cognitive perspective seems to be more popular for explanations of the human behaviour, and unfortunately the cognitive approach (internal processing of the mind) cannot be so easily studied, as it is the study of 'unobservable mental processes'. If we later refer it back to the definitions of a science, its seems that the Cognitive Perspective so far diverges quite far way from being a science, which needs to be 'observable'. So far, it can neither be 'proved' as well. Psychology as a whole therefore cannot really be pinpointed down into the term 'science;. Although in psychology, the scientific method

  • Word count: 923
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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TOK History Essay

TOK History Essay In what ways could it be said that interpretations in History are more effected by the different Ways of Knowing (language, reason, emotion, perception) than knowledge in Mathematics is? History is the study of the past. Mathematics is the study of concepts such as quantity, structure, space and change. Therefore, since the two areas of knowledge differ, the acquisition of knowledge in these areas will also differ. For example, the methods used to gather historical information/data cannot be used in mathematics: one will not try and find historical objects such as archaeologists do in order to acquire knowledge in mathematics because the result has no link to the knowledge area of mathematics. It is therefore clear that acquiring knowledge in the knowledge area of history will be different from acquiring knowledge in mathematics. The Ways of Knowing (language, reason, emotion, perception) are instrumental aspects in trying to acquire information in any Area of Knowledge. The way that these Ways of Knowing affect the acquisition of knowledge in the different Areas of Knowledge varies because the methods for acquiring data in the knowledge areas vary. This difference is particularly noticeable in the acquisition of knowledge in history and mathematics. This essay will investigate how the Ways of Knowing affect the acquisition of knowledge in both history and

  • Word count: 1761
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Science Essay TOK

Alex Kluivert Theory of Knowledge I IB 4 March 2009 Facts vs. Facts Henri Poincare once said that "Science is built of facts the way a house is built of bricks: but an accumulation of facts is no more science than a pile of bricks is a house", this is a very interesting quote that one could derive many meanings from. The first thing that the quote shows is that there is more to science then just a random jumble of facts. It also poses the question that if science is built on facts yet facts do not always make up science, is there more than one type of fact? People certainly use the term fact loosely. Many times you will hear someone say that this is a historical fact, or this is a scientific fact. Is there a difference between these two? Yes, there is a huge difference, if one is to believe in a correspondent society the empirical truths of science should always come before the truths of history. Yet this is not always the case. For some reason people see science as debatable and history as more of an undisputed truth. This is wrong. Two of the most trusted and respected areas of knowledge in todays society are science and history, but when weighed against each other scientific facts should always offset historical facts. In a correspondence world, science is considered the strongest of the truth tests. An empirical truth is thought of as a fact that has been confirmed by

  • Word count: 893
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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To understand something you need to rely on your own experience and culture. Does this mean that it is impossible to have objective knowledge?

IB Diploma Programme Examination session: May 2009 Utahloy International School of Guangzhou (IB code 001847) Theory of Knowledge Essay Title No: 8 "To understand something you need to rely on your own experience and culture. Does this mean that it is impossible to have objective knowledge?" (Number of words: 1600) Submitted by Xiang Wang (candidate no. 001847- 030) Table of Contents Introduction..............................................................................................3 Body....................................................................................................4-9 Conclusion............................................................................................10 Bibliography..........................................................................................11 Introduction Objective knowledge can be achieved even our experience and culture have been affecting us. However, it can only be achieved in certain areas of knowledge such as natural sciences and mathematics because the knowledge in these two is discovered. Other areas of knowledge are invented by us so objective knowledge can not be achieved in these areas because they are bias during the invention process. Knowledge can be defined as justified true belief, which means that if what we believe is true, and

  • Word count: 1777
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Which sources of knowledge-books, websites, the media, personal experience, authorities or some other- do you most consider trustworthy, and why?

Which sources of knowledge-books, websites, the media, personal experience, authorities or some other- do you most consider trustworthy, and why? Every day we process new pieces of information, and from this new information we try to find the truth, to do this we need trustworthy information. We get information from everywhere, we're constantly being buffered by new knowledge, but what do we choose to be true and trustworthy? In the world today it is hard to be certain on anything, even own experiences, without having to rely on what you've read, seen, felt, been told etc. One of our main sources of knowledge historically are books, without them how could we know about the past, the world, different languages, practically everything, even what we learn in this course is in a book. Without them we would only be able to learn from word of mouth, our own experiences and the Internet, but this itself has only been around about 20 years. Books have been around for hundreds of years, but this does not make them trustworthy. Books can often be biased, if you were to compare an American history book to an English one they would surely tell different stories of the war, an author can only write from their own perspective, from what they've seen, heard, read and this could give them a completely different spin on something compared to you. And yet even though we know these things

  • Word count: 1551
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Facts or feelings what is more important? We cant prove anything without facts and without facts, there is nothing that would provoke feelings in us.

Facts or feelings - what is more important? We can't prove anything without facts and without facts, there is nothing that would provoke feelings in us. But if I have to choose between the two options , I would unquestionably choose emotions because without them we are nothing. Emotions help us live life. We are happy, sad, angry all because we "feel ". We fail to realize that the world which we live in is a world of emotions. Without feelings we humans will not be very different from robots who do what they are supposed to, tirelessly without ever "feeling" any emotion. It is emotions which make us realize what is right and what is wrong; it is emotions which give us enough passion to drive through every obstacle and it is emotions which make the human kind unsellable. Some people do say that we are living in a world where facts are veryuthing and there has to be a reason behind whatever we do, even what we feel. But what the yforget in this "factual" style of thinking is that at the end of the day we do what we want to, what our heart desires, not what we must do or what our brain suggests after solving all the trivial conspiracies of the society. If we look back in time, To this day, we suffer because Adam and Eve chose to give in to their feelings rather than the fact that God had told them not to eat the forbidden fruit in His garden of eden. the human kind has been

  • Word count: 451
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Emotion Vs Reason

'Sometimes we hear reasoned arguments that oppose a view to which we are emotionally committed; sometimes we hear a passionate plea for a view we have good reason to reject. Bearing this in mind, discuss the importance of reason and emotion in distinguishing between belief and knowledge.' In the modern and technological age of the 21st century, almost everyone in the world is united through the relentless outpouring of information that may play a significant role to desensitise our reason and sensitise our passion. This information is seemingly presented but in fact, reiterated and almost forcefully being driven into our minds. As the frequency of these updates increases and our minds become more accustomed to it, the amplitude and connotations can lose their context to result in us, the audience, being presented with this information, where neither reason nor emotion is sufficient to differentiate between knowledge and belief. When reason and emotion conflict, we are presented with the age-old question, of whether to "listen to your head, or listen to your heart?" To be able to distinguish between the two, one must first understand the similarities within their definitions. A belief is a form of knowledge that is largely based on something personal, from a source usually lacking judgement, understanding or justification. A belief derives from one's personal and cultural

  • Word count: 2116
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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