Is Santa Real

"Is Santa Possible?" By: Alice Wang If Santa Claus did not match the stereotype that has been given out by the media, family, and friends for centuries and was the "polar" opposite, he could be possible. First, the man would have to lose about 20 dress sizes and go anorexic every Christmas because of the thin chimneys that are all across the world. Hey if Kristie Alley can do it on Jenny Craig, and both Santa and Kristie Alley are both obese, why can't Santa Claus lose weight? Next, he would have to make a time capsule in order to give each good Christian child a gift. Santa would have 31 hours of Christmas to work with if he goes from east to west because of the various time zones and the rotation of the earth. Analytically, he would have to visit about 823 houses in a second assuming that he would have to park, hop out of the sleigh, jump down the chimney, fill the stockings, distribute the presents, eat the milk and cookies, and get back on the sleigh. Assuming that there are 91.8 million stops (supposing that each household has 3 kids), Santa Claus would have to run .78 miles per household, which is calculated to a total trip of 75 and a half million miles, not counting the fact that he would have to go do what every human would have to do every couple of hours. That means that Santa's sleigh would have to move 650 miles per second. Hey if Superman can fly around at the

  • Word count: 518
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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TOK mock essay

"The prisoner is not the one who has committed a crime, but the one who clings to his crime and lives it over and over." Henry Miller Contrary to popular belief that it is a fine line that separates a prisoner from an inmate, I believe that there is a distinctive difference between being a prisoner and being an inmate. Taking into account the literary definition that a prisoner is an individual who "is legally committed to prison as a punishment for crimes they have committed", I strongly disagree that a prisoner is merely limited to someone who is legally committed to prison. In this essay, I will explore and justify - with regards to the movie Frankenstein - how a prisoner is also an individual who is mentally imprisoned by the consequences of his or her actions. Firstly, it is seen throughout the movie that scientist Victor Frankenstein constantly suffers the repercussions of creating life in the form of his "monster creation, Frankenstein". Though Victor Frankenstein is not a prisoner per se by literary definition, his constant struggle with his action and enslavement to his creation has given viewers reason enough to think of him as a prisoner of his own actions. His constant nightmares of Victor Frankenstein is a further indication that in his thoughts, he is constantly reliving his action of creating Frankenstein. Here we see how Victor Frankenstein clings to his

  • Word count: 518
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Is it necessary to be highly competitive to be highly successful?

Is it necessary to be highly competitive to be highly successful? The human race today, is striving for success. We choose those paths which will bring success to us, not those which we want to choose. We bend our paths, break rules, create rules and at the end of it make sure that success is at our feet - by hook or by crook. I too want to be successful in life, enjoy the luxuries , the good life.But, success at the cost of our morals, our ethics isn't the kind of success I would like to achieve. Competition is without a doubt important. If we don't have competition in the society, people would become complacent thinking they are the best without actually knowing where they stand. Competition gives us a motive to go ahead. It gives us passion to become a winner and it keeps making us realize the need for self improvisation. Thus, they are both of great magnitude. But, the complexity comes in when we have to choose between the two. Competition is unavoidable in today's world as everyone is endeavoring to make his mark in the society and all these people have their own way of doing that. Some adopt bribery, some adopt corruption and some simply adopt the scheme of pushing the competitors out of their way - any way possible. But, there are also some people who adopt morality, integrity and an attitude where they don't move ahead alone, they make sure they take everyone they

  • Word count: 517
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Why isnt it just as good to be happy as to be sad?

Why isn't it just as good to be happy as to be sad? From the childhood the world around us teaches every one of us why isn't it just as good to be happy as to be sad. The world is always divided into white and black sides. We learn that it is right and good to be happy but not to be sad. The language is not able to describe exactly all those feelings that humans can sense. That's why some words are created by people that characterize some groups of feelings and emotions. For example, being buoyant, kind, cheerful, outgoing, attractive and energetic is means to be HAPPY. In opposite, being melancholy, dolorous, dreary, lamentable is considered to be SAD. We feel different emotions like happy or sad because of various situations. Specifically, we use and ability to feel, perceive and observe the world around us by using sensory perception. More often we people can't fully describe their mental state of emotions, but human's body can always feel the changes in itself and outwards things. So when a human is healthy, energetic, fresh and cheerful it means the person is happy. But if a human's body is sick, or feels pain, a person will be sad. Reason plays a great role in emotional state of a person. We know that reason is another source of self discovering, another way of knowing. It is often a case that motivates in life. By using reason as a thoughtful response people can

  • Word count: 517
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Rationalism vs. Empiricism

Katie Albertucci September 28, 2005 Rationalism vs. Empiricism The disagreement between rationalism and empiricism is the way in which we gain knowledge. Rationalism is a theory that reason is the basis of all certainty of knowledge whereas empiricism is based on the principles that all knowledge comes from experience especially that from our senses and that the knowledge we acquire is the basis of our understanding. Each theory, however, has a problem of knowledge because you can never solely have empirical or rational knowledge. Rational knowledge occurs in any situation where we are taught something. Impersonal or propositional knowledge are examples of rational knowledge for the reason that through both logic is used to acquire knowledge. Rational knowledge requires the mind to be active in gaining knowledge whereas experience is downplayed. Mathematics is all rational knowledge; we are either taught how to do a problem or through deductive reasoning we are able to find the solution to a problem. There is however a problem of knowledge with rationalism; many people do not learn through being told and therefore they must experience things for themselves. Subconscious knowledge does not come naturally to some people especially children. For example in chemistry we know now, as young adults, that when you are boiling water the burner is hot, however as a child, one

  • Word count: 515
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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TOK essay Does thought control language or does language control thought

Does thought control language or does language control thought? Language can be thought of as a symbol system, engaged in representing the world, capturing and communicating thought and experience. One of the many definitions of the word "language" we can find in any dictionary. However every person may have thought of a similar definition but it is rarely identical to what other people would think of. There is an immense variety of words that when put together in a structured sentences construct a context that we understand and communicate with. Furthermore when combining words together the context may vary depending on the words themselves. It is interesting to see how people have mastered the use of language to express their feelings, emotions It is interesting to see how people have mastered the use of language to express their "ideas, emotions and desires", along with poets that play with words to create a distant reality that each of us would imagine in our own unique way, making literature so vastly fascinating. Language has to be Rule-governed, otherwise we can't communicate properly. If there are no rules to language we may not easily differ some situations e.g. I kicked the ball - rules tell us that I am the kicker and the ball is the receiver. Word order, grammar, etc. could change the meaning. Language has to be intended, creative and open minded to ensure that

  • Word count: 513
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Is mathematics invented or discovered?

Is Mathematics Invented or Discovered? Is mathematics discoverable or is it simply invented by the immense brainpower of certain mathematicians? For centuries humans have pondered over this deep and complex matter. Mathematics can be explained in massive detail, although it is commonly summarized as "the abstract science of numbers, quantity, and space" (www.dictionary.com). Humans have assigned mathematical rules around our universe as a device used to identify and explain the void's truths. Therefore mathematics is used to express discoveries by using the invention of a language. From my perspective this makes mathematics a combination of both invention and discovery. The axioms have always been welded into our universe, and humans have constructed a system in which we can explore them. This relates to Joshua Hills theory, a young student at Harvard,"So we discover the world around us, now how do we use and manipulate this world. Invent Mathematics." This theorem can be justified by the advent of numerals. The base 20 numeral system was invented thousands of years ago by the Pre-Columbian Maya Civilisation most likely used to count something as basic as cattle or other livestock. Without the invention of numbers we would be without a system that is used to illustrate how much there is. This relates to Hill's theory as humans have discovered that there are a certain

  • Word count: 513
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Problem solving in management. Problems come to a manager in all sizes and shapes, and almost always, in a never-ending queue. It is better that a manager perceives this phenomenon in a positive way

Problem -Solving in management Problems come to a manager in all sizes and shapes, and almost always, in a never-ending queue. It is better that a manager perceives this phenomenon in a positive way. Sir John Harvey-Jones says that a manager without a problem is a manager without a job. But indeed there is a way to deal with management problems. The manager must develop a mental attitude and culture in which dealing with problems becomes a matter of routine. He must cultivate the habit of anticipating problems and working out solutions for them. He must develop the disposition of a doctor, who is treating the disease of a patient. To establish a routine, it is necessary to evolve a model. The model will help the manager to proceed in a logical sequence of thought process. It will enable him in terms of an analytical framework A problem is not always prima facie what it appears to be.Usually, there is more to it than meets the eye.The problem that is being brought to the attention of the manager is more often only the symptom of a deeper and underlying malady. Hence, it is vital to unravel the real cause of the problem to arrive at an enduring solution. Sometimes, the so called problem may not be a problem at all; but only the result of a miscommunication or a misunderstanding. Therefore, it is necessary at the outset to define the problem-if there is one-and define it

  • Word count: 508
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Science has both similarities and differences in the way it approaches knowledge as compared to other areas of knowledge

TOK Science Essay Science is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe. In an older and closely related meaning, "science" refers to the body of reliable knowledge itself, of the type that can be logically and rationally explained. Also, science is more similar to knowledge as an area of knowledge than the others, because it is actually based on observing and criticizing certain aspects of the environment and how things work around us. Through science we can gain knowledge of certain phenomena and characteristics of the world, and therefore apply this knowledge to make our life easier by progressing as technology evolves. Science could also be compared with mathematics, since mathematics is also an area of knowledge. Mathematics is essential to the sciences. One important function of mathematics in science is the role it plays in the expression of scientific models. Observing and collecting measurements, as well as hypothesizing and predicting, often require extensive use of mathematics. Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus, for example, are all essential to physics. Moreover, science could be compared to ethics/religion. As stated before, science is the process of searching or seeking the truth on the basis of facts. If ethics is good vs. bad, right vs. wrong

  • Word count: 507
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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Is there Truth in Art?

2 Apr. 27, 12 Is there Truth in Art? Art is all things made by man which are collectively perceived to have creative value, including but not limited to: elegant mathematical proofs, interesting cosmological models, paintings, and great literary works. All of these “frivolous” activities by their nature lead us closer to truth. Plato will of course disagree with this claiming that by further skewing the shadows on the walls of his cave we are obviously further from truth. However, isn’t refocusing our lens the best way to capture more of the picture. Art lets us shift our perception and communicate it to our species. Paintings, which are held of value, did not get to that position by mistake. It was a conscious decision of our species to consider it art. The perspective the artist provides is one that is possibly different from our own. Looking at the night sky everyone sees something different, but we all have Van Gough’s Starry Night to interpret together. This offers us a liberating new glance towards beliefs we may already hold. While it can be argued that culture affects our perception too heavily to be open to new ideas portrayed in art, through expression of a new way in approach those who wish to see beyond what their rose coloured glasses show them, have an opportunity to see. In an epistemological pursuit

  • Word count: 506
  • Level: International Baccalaureate
  • Subject: Theory of Knowledge
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