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Discuss how and why British culture changed so dramatically during the 1960s. Evaluate its influence both within British society and globally.

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Introduction

25885723 Discuss how and why British culture changed so dramatically during the 1960s. Evaluate its influence both within British society and globally. ?The 60s have been described by historians as the ten years having the most significant changes in history. [?] The 60s were influenced by the youth of the post-war baby boom ? a generation with a fondness for change and far-out gadgets.?[1] The 60s had a big impact on the society in many different areas. It was a decade with many personalities and some important events. To name only a few, there was John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, the first human on the moon, the Beatles, the creation of ARPANET. The whole world was affected by this decade; however, this essay will focus on what happened in Britain and how these changes affected the country itself and the rest of the world. First of all, a short history of the country is needed to understand better the context in which the changes took place. There was a period when the British Empire was really powerful: it is called the Victorian era.[2]? By the end of Victoria's reign, the British Empire extended over about one-fifth of the earth's surface and almost a quarter of the world's population at least theoretically owed allegiance to the 'queen empress'.?[3] However, this could not last forever: the colonies wanted their independence more and more, and this was the beginning of the decline of the British Empire. ...read more.

Middle

This led to increasing feminist movements over the country. ?The first British women?s right group was formed in Hull in 1968?.[10] This group demanded for the ?recognition of an independent sexuality focused on heterosexual activity with an assertion of women?s rights to enjoy sex, to have it before marriage without incurring criticism, and to control contraception and, thus, their own fertility?.[11] Finally, one of the most important changes that happened in the 60s concerned the music area. The Beatles and the Rolling Stones are both groups that began to have a worldwide success in this period of time. The Beatles first played in Liverpool; however, they began to be known in the whole country a couple of years later, and even in the whole world. It was the first British music group going to play in the United States of America. Their music had a big influence and even a phenomenon called the Beatlemania.[12] People getting crazy at the concerts of the Beatles marked this. The band did not only have a huge musical influence, but also in other areas, such as fashion for example. The Beatles were known as ?the good boys? whereas the Rolling Stones were always described as ?the bad boys?. Their influences in the music area were very similar though (mostly rock?n?roll), however the Beatles changed their style over the years. ...read more.

Conclusion

Beatlemania 1964-1965 [online], available: http://classicrock.about.com/od/beatles/a/beatles_history_3.htm [accessed 06/01/2013] Beatles & Rolling Stones [online], available: http://pianoweb.free.fr/beatles-rollingstones.php [accessed 06/01/2013] MARWICK, A. (1996) British society since 1945 ed. Penguin books THOMSON, D. (1991) England in the Twentieth Century, ed. Penguin books BLACK, J. (2000) Modern British History since 1900, ed. Macmillan CAWOOD, I. (2004) Britain in the twentieth century ed. Routledge ________________ [1] BELLIS, M. 20th Century Timeline, The 60s ? the technology, science, and inventions [online], available: http://inventors.about.com/od/timelines/a/modern_2.htm [accessed 02/01/2013] [2] EVANS, E. (2011) Overview: Victorian Britain, 1837 ? 1901 [online], available: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/victorians/overview_victorians_01.shtml [accessed 03/01/2013] [3] EVANS, E. (2011) Overview: Victorian Britain, 1837 ? 1901 [online], available: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/victorians/overview_victorians_01.shtml [accessed 03/01/2013] [4] CAWOOD, I. (2004) Britain in the twentieth century ed. Routledge [5] CAWOOD, I. (2004) Britain in the twentieth century ed. Routledge [6] BENN, T. (2003) Visit marks victory over racism [online], available: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/bristol/2926759.stm [accessed 04/01/2013] [7] Racism in Britain in the Twentieth Century [online], available: http://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=147763 [accessed 04/01/2013] [8] The Nobel Peace Prize 1964 [online], available: http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1964/king-bio.html [accessed 04/01/2013] [9] BLACK, J. (2011) Overview: Britain from 1945 onwards [online], available: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/modern/overview_1945_present_01.shtml [accessed 02/01/2013] [10] BLACK, J. (2000) Modern British History since 1900, ed. Macmillan [11] BLACK, J. (2000) Modern British History since 1900, ed. Macmillan [12] WHITE, D. Beatlemania 1964-1965 [online], available: http://classicrock.about.com/od/beatles/a/beatles_history_3.htm [accessed 06/01/2013] [13] CAWOOD, I. (2004) Britain in the twentieth century ed. Routledge ...read more.

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