Siddhartha - What message do you think Hermann Hesse wishes to convey by the way he concludes the novel?

Man Ju Y13A English What message do you think Hermann Hesse wishes to convey by the way he concludes the novel? "Siddhartha" is one of the famous books written by Hermann Hesse. It is a novel about Siddhartha, the protagonist, seeking for self-realization, inner knowledge and ultimate reality. Although some people might regard this book as a rather uninteresting book, I believe that it is because they have not study the book profoundly. In my opinion, it is a thoughtful book which can make us understand the meaning of life. In the following essay, I would discuss about what Hermann Hesse wishes to convey by the way he concludes the novel. First I would like to talk about Siddhartha's love for his son. In the chapter "Om", the story first deals with the sorrow that Siddhartha is suffering from losing his son. Hesse is trying to emphasize that both the love between parent and child and the love between male and female are important to all of us human beings. Not until Siddhartha has his own son did he understand the love towards one's child. When Siddhartha sees parents with their children, or man with his wife, he knows the feeling they have. But this understanding neither makes his wound heal nor make him forget about the lost of his son. When Siddhartha looks into the river, he sees his reflection staring back. And it reminds him of his father, who must "had

  • Word count: 1272
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Historical and Philosophical studies
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Zen the True Vehicle for Social Change.

Joseph R Knupp Zen Buddhism 2/17/01 Professor Olson Pledge: Zen the True Vehicle for Social Change In his time Ikkyu was viewed by the monastic community and lay people as a crazy amoral monk. His drinking binges and cavorting with women were looked down upon. People saw him as a man devoted to the world. The truth of Ikkyu was his deep devotion to the salvation of others. He rejected the closed stifling monastic community. Instead he embraced life and guided the "evil" people toward enlightenment. Ikkyu was the salvation of medieval Zen. Hakuin also aided in the rejuvenation of medieval Zen. He introduced the great doubt. This approach to enlightenment was useful for the masses. It helped make Zen possible for the lay people, not just the privileged Zen acolytes. While Ikkyu must have acted in an ethical manner due to his enlightened state he would appear to be ethical to all if he adhered to the code of monastic life. Ikkyu's methodology and Hakuin's Great Doubt provided the tools for Zen to become a vessel for social change. An enlightened being actions are inherently ethical, because enlightenment carries within it the supreme knowledge of good and evil and the ability to do only good. According to Ives "actions springing from satori are inherently good and hence if the person has been designated as a roshi on the basis of an acknowledged satori -

  • Word count: 1008
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Historical and Philosophical studies
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Evolving Traditions of Buddhism.

Evolving Traditions of Buddhism Sri Lanka, when Buddhism first arrived in the third century BCE, was a great center of Buddhist learning for the thousand years following Buddhism's arrival. Therevada Buddhism defines itself by referring to traditions and teachings that were established between the fifth and tenth centuries in Sri Lanka. Buddhism was introduced to Sri Lanka by Mahinda, after which there emerged three great divisions of the Sangha on the island, each of which centered on a monastery in the ancient capital of Anuradhapura. Mahavihara, great monastery, is the oldest of the monasteries and was established by Mahinda in the third century, the Abhayagiri-vihara in the first century BCE, and the Jetavana in the third century CE. None of the writings of the monks of Abhayagiri and the Jetavana monasteries survived, which makes it hard to tell how their traditions differed from those of the Mahavihara. There appeared to be a rivalry between them due to a Mahavihara opposition to their Mahayana sympathies, which is simplistic and problematic. The schools of Chinese Buddhism are divided into two categories, those that have a more or less direct Indian counterpart and those which have a more or less direct Indian counterpart and those that are native to China. The principal schools are the Vinaya, the Kosa, the Madhyamaka, the Yogacara, and the Mantrayana. Those schools

  • Word count: 527
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Historical and Philosophical studies
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J. Bury, The Idea of Progress

J. Bury, The Idea of Progress . Appleby et al. write: 'Before there could be moderns, there had to be ancients'. Did Enlightenment writers think that theirs was a new age or epoch, no longer dominated by antiquity and tradition? How did they distinguish their age from the 'past'? Enlightenment writers believed that to some extent arts are brought to perfection by experience and long labour (i.e. progress) and therefore the modern age must, as a result, have the advantage over that of the ancients. On the other hand, some argued that this was not the case because the same arts and studies are not always uninterruptedly pursued by the most powerful intellects, and so can decline or even be extinguished. In distinguishing their age from the past, Enlightenment writers often spoke of their time as a 'great age', comparable to the Age of Augustus. Few of the Enlightenment writers would have preferred to have lived at any other time. J. Bury states that 'the Enlightenment of the present age surpasses that of antiquity: La docte Antiquité dans toute sans sa durée A l'égal de nos jours ne fut point éclairée'. 2. Appleby et al. also write: 'Progress and modernity...marched hand in hand'. Did Enlightenment writers invent the idea of progress? What did they think progress consisted of? (Did they all agree, for example, about where it was evident, how far it could go, how

  • Word count: 468
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Historical and Philosophical studies
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