To many linguists, literary creativity refers to the way people uses literary-like features in everyday discourse. It traditionally associated with poetry and other forms of literature, which includes playing with the sounds and structures of language rep

To many linguists, literary creativity refers to the way people uses literary-like features in everyday discourse. It traditionally associated with poetry and other forms of literature, which includes playing with the sounds and structures of language repetition, metaphor, rhyme and rhythm. These could be found in everyday conversation that have connects with everyday creativity and literature. According to Maybin and Pearce, literary creativity involves the breaking rules of normal language uses, asserting and strikingly different local norm, for example, deviation. In other words, it is distinct from ordinary language (Swann, 2006, p.3). Literary language has a higher valued form of language where words and phrases are carefully chosen for the artistic effect and responded to aesthetically by listeners and readers. People could see the literature as a distinct way of using language. There are different approaches to look up to the study of creativity in language (or literature). According to Michael Toolan, literary creativity may involve the breaking rules of normal language use, asserting and strikingly different local norm, for example, deviation. In other words, it is distinct from ordinary language (Swann, 2006, p.3). In terms of literature, a textual approach can be used to language study, i.e. the analysis of concerning with the formal properties of spoken and

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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In the poem "Facing It" by Yusef Komunyakaa, the author uses first person narration, metaphor, simile

Komuyakaa's Expression of Self in Facing It In the poem "Facing It" by Yusef Komunyakaa, the author uses first person narration, metaphor, simile, images of light and darkness, personification, allusion and word connotation in order to convey to his detached audience the intimate experience of making his pilgrimage to the Vietnam War Veteran's Memorial in Washington DC. For Komunyakaa, an African American Writer and Vietnam Veteran, the emotions associated with the memorial are complex, sad, disheartening, and cherished. Through the use of these various literary devices, Komunyakaa is not only able to share his experience with his audience, but to draw the audience into the narrative of the poem, and place the realities of war inside the lives and hearts of his audience. On the surface, Yusef Komuyakaa's "Facing It" is the first-person account of Komunyakaa's own pilgrimage to the Vietnam Memorial. Komunyakaa uses a first person narrator, because this is certainly his story, and as such he does not wish to detach himself from the narrative. Also, the first person narration makes the story more vivid and real for the audience by pulling us closer to the story through intimacy with the narrator. Through the use of the "I" the audience is able to identify with, and relate to the emotions that the narrator of the poem-that is, Komunyakka-experiences. My black face fades,

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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A Poetic Approach to the Holocaust: As presented by Andrew Hudgins

Cassie Weigel Mr. David Olsen, Instructor ENGA 202-07 Intro to Literary Studies 28 April, 2005 A Poetic Approach to the Holocaust: As presented by Andrew Hudgins The Holocaust was a time of inexplicable devastation whose effects transcend both time and history. As a result of the impact that its events had on both those directly and indirectly affected, numerous Holocaust literatures have been produced in commemoration to the lives lost in an attempt to show how the devastation continues to affect all who experienced it or have knowledge of it. This literature has taken many forms in various books, movies, short stories, and poems, where each medium of remembrance gives a different perspective that illuminates a unique aspect of the genocide. Holocaust poetry, for example, ambiguously describes the genocide in terms of imagery and representative explanation - it gives the writer a chance to pay tribute to the horrors of the Holocaust without overwhelming the reader with harsh description (Friedman 553). One such poem is Andrew Hudgins' "Air View of an Industrial Scene" in which he, as a non-affiliated person to the Holocaust, describes the last moments of those soon to be burned alive. It is intriguing how Hudgins had the insight to describe the moments that he did not experience firsthand. Since Hudgins was not directly affected by the Holocaust, he was in need

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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The Great White Shark

The Great White Shark Carcharodon Carcharias, white pointer, man-eater, white death, or what have you, the great white shark patrols the ocean as one of the world's most ferocious predators to date. Being labeled as a killer isn't a very good way to view a great white. They should more or less be viewed as a misunderstood fish. Great whites are considered solitary predators, but some are currently being studied off the coast of South Africa because of a strange phenomenon that only happens in those waters. This phenomenon is that the great whites hunt in packs of three or more and are often very coordinated. Little is known about the great whites of the world, but some vital statistics have been observed. The great white can grow to 21 feet, but are averaged around 13-17 although reports of larger great whites, some in excess of 31 feet, have been reported, but not officially investigated or tagged.1 On average great whites weigh one to two tons, this makes for a slow swim speed, but these agile creatures can reach burst speeds of up to 15 mph which is fast for a shark this large. In fact, in South Africa the more aggressive sharks have been observed leaping five to fifteen feet out of the water in search of catching the seals that swim there. This is called a breach, which will be covered more in-depth later in this report. Although the official age of a great white

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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The Holocaust was a time when countless Jews, and others deemed "undesirables" by Hitler and the Nazis, underwent the most cruel and inhumane persecution while trapped in concentration camps under the power of the Third Reich. Elie Wiesel's Night is an ac

Night The Holocaust was a time when countless Jews, and others deemed "undesirables" by Hitler and the Nazis, underwent the most cruel and inhumane persecution while trapped in concentration camps under the power of the Third Reich. Elie Wiesel's Night is an account of his unimaginably shocking experiences in and traveling to such concentration camps as only a young boy. While Wiesel does not specify in the book why he chose the title Night, it can be assumed that it is in reference to a number of Wiesel's most disturbing memories of events that occur at night. However, there also seems to be an underlying denotative meaning, as the Holocaust for Wiesel and his fellow prisoners is one long night of both physical and emotional pain, suffering, and death. Wiesel is incurably traumatized as a young boy undergoing this appalling experience that is the Holocaust. As well as everyday life in the camps, this is due largely to many particular events that happen to Wiesel at night, the first of which is the ordeal with Madame Schächter and the nighttime fires. A group of Jews from Wiesel's hometown are packed into a cattle wagon by the Nazi's and taken away from their homes. None of them knows where they are going or what awaits them when they arrive, yet a family friend of Wiesel's named Madame Schächter rouses every night to shriek about the fires she sees outside the cattle

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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"The Black Lace Fan My Mother Gave Me" by Eavan Boland.

IB Language A 0/7/03 Commentary "The Black Lace Fan My Mother Gave Me" Eavan Boland Poetry can be used as a means of expression for some poets. However, Eavan Boland states that she has "never turned to poetry as a method of expression". Boland describes poetry as being "a very demanding art form" that does not lend itself to the mere expression or description of an experience. Instead, she claims that she writes "not to express the experience, but to experience it further". This justification of her writing is depicted in the poem "The Black Lace Fan My Mother Gave Me". Throughout the poem, Boland transports the reader back to the moment when a woman, her mother, received a very special gift from her lover. She emphasizes specific details about the weather, the characters' actions, and the fan itself in order to re-live her mother's experience. Boland utilizes symbolism, metaphors, and similes to illustrate the reoccurring theme of the fan and the steamy romance of the relationship. The first aspect of the poem identified is the setting. Boland portrays the moment in prewar France, in a café on the Boulevard de Capucines. It was a dry summer's night with a storm brewing in the distance. This description allows the reader to bond with the emotion of the characters: the anticipation, the adrenaline of a scandalous romance, and passionate aura of Paris. The

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Poem explication - Life at War

Bryan Stearley February 26, 2003 Poem explication Life at War "War!" It's around us all the time. If we're not at war then there is always some other country around the world that is. It's all over movies and all over the news everyday. Almost always showing the same thing, violence and innocent lives being taken. There are many people that disagree with the idea of War. As I read the poem, "Life at War" by Levertov, I started to realize that she might be one of these people. Sometimes the images that people get from reading a poem can't be found until they have read it many times. Then and only then does that person have a full and complete understanding of what they are reading. In the poem she talks about War and how it affects human life for the bad. The poem portrays the image that Levertov is against War and that mankind will never be able to live at peace because of War. The first reason why I believe that Levertov is against the idea of War is the way she speaks of Man. In the poem she can't believe how man could do such things to one another. She can't believe that such a sensitive being can do such harmful and hateful things to each other. She says, "...these acts are one to our own flesh"(964). By that she is saying that these acts of War that we as people "convince ourselves that it is necessary"(964) is actually done to our own flesh because we

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Herman Melville was moved so much by the Civil War that he wrote a volume of sensitive poetry.

ROMANTIC PERIOD (War, Division, and Reconciliation) "A Requiem" Skimming lightly, wheeling still, The Swallows fly low Over the fields in clouded days, The forest-field of Shiloh - Herman Melville Herman Melville was moved so much by the Civil War that he wrote a volume of sensitive poetry that treated happenings of the war in a quiet, mournful tone. "A Requiem" was the name of his poem about the Battle of Shiloh, since it was written to honor all of the soldiers that died there. Fought in western Tennessee in April 1862, the battle was one of the bloodiest events of the American Civil War. With at least 10,000 deaths of soldiers from each side, Shiloh was a very decisive event. It proved that war would be a long and bitter struggle despite all of the cheering, flag waving, and brave rhetoric of the previous spring. Just as the revolution before it, the Civil War absorbed the creative energies of the nation. Notable songs, speeches, journals, letters, and memoirs appeared. Many writers became involved with the Civil War, and the leaders of both sides produced some of the most important wartime literature. Walt Whitman, a poet, was a towering literary figure that emerged during the wartime era. There was no public opposition of slavery until the Civil War. Thomas Jefferson's first draft of the Declaration of Independence described the trading of slaves as a

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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