Compare William Makepeace Thackeray's 'The Due of the Dead' and Sir Henry Newbolt's 'Vitai Lampada' in terms of their effectiveness of form, structure, language and context.

Q. Compare William Makepeace Thackeray's 'The Due of the Dead' and Sir Henry Newbolt's 'Vitai Lampada' in terms of their effectiveness of form, structure, language and context. As pre-First World War literary pieces, Thackeray's 'The Due of the Dead' and Newbolt's 'Vitai Lampada' share similar thematic threads, for example in the allusions to the ideals of honour and obligation, evident in the reference to 'gallant, patient hearts' and the personification of 'Honour' as 'a name' , in a contextual establishment where the majority of the upper class - to whom the poetic form of communication appealed most specifically to - lived behind an intricately fabricated façade of religious morality. Moreover, both poems also exhibit an emphasis on structure and rhythm, and while Newbolt opts for the effective poetic form of 8-line stanzas in a tight, regular structure, Thackeray utilises an ordered 4-line stanza structure with 8-syllable lines to maintain a constant rhythmic pace. There is also a prominence of rhyme with both poets employing the ABAB rhyme scheme, and the rhythmic structure explicit most especially in 'The Due of the Dead' provides an emphasis on the last words of each line, thereby complementing the poem's aural quality. Thackeray presents the central message of 'The Due of the Dead' effectively through the division of the poem into four distinct sections from the

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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TMA 1 Read Wilfred Owens Dulce et Decorum Est then answer the following questions.

TMA 1 – Read Wilfred Owen’s ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ then answer the following questions. Question 1 (a) Describe what effects the poem has on you. My immediate response is one of detachment; it is a completely alien situation which I find hard to relate to. The vividness of the poem is shocking and the description of the soldier’s death invokes more pity for soldiers than I have felt before. (b) Say what you think the subject matter is. The poem depicts a platoon of soldiers who come under a chemical weapons attack in the First World War. The narrator uses his account of watching a man die in agony to dispel the propagandist lie that it is lovely and honourable to die for one’s country. Word count: 91 Question 2 (a) Identify and list in note form three of the techniques used in these lines. Simile Metaphor Onomatopoeia (b) Comment in complete sentences on what the effects of the three techniques you have identified might be. The use of similes such as “like old beggars” implies the war has robbed the soldiers of their dignity and reduced them to vagabonds without honour or respectability. “Coughing like hags” is used to revolt and disturb the reader, it illustrates the soldiers as diseased and grotesque but it also suggests the war has aged them prematurely and these men are as fragile as old women. Metaphors such as “drunk with

  • Word count: 1133
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Evolution of Man?

Robyn Good Good 1 Professor Hilderbrand Introduction to Poetry May 12, 2003 Assignment 2: appreciation Evolution of Man? In the poem "From Stone to Steel" Pratt begins with a cynical ironic stance and then at the last two lines of the poem ends with compassion and hope. Throughout the poem Pratt appears to be mocking man's brutality and questions whether man has really changed at all over the years. E.J Pratt was living in a time of change. He was amid the 1st world war and the second industrial revolution. This poem is during World War 1 and is about man and his evolution. The persona is a person who is older because s/he has experienced the world because s/he is knowledgeable. The persona is the voice that emits moral judgments by evolution and historical comparisons. Human history is intertwined into two things: the brutal immoral Neanderthal and the evolved humans who put on a façade of not being brutal and immoral. The entire first stanza makes the reader feel time lapse. The first line starts with a reference to evolution. When man was caveman he used to use stone, then he evolved to bronze and lastly moved on to steel. The persona is talking about Ancient to Modern times. This first line is a reference to historical development. The next two lines make Good 2 the reader feel the time duration. "Two revolutions of the wheel, from Java to

  • Word count: 1100
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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How does Owen change his affiliations in "Translations"? Discuss his role as translator and 'go-between'.

How does Owen change his affiliations in "Translations"? Discuss his role as translator and 'go-between' When Owen is introduced in the play he is working with the English to Anglicise Irish place names. As the play progresses, Owen's affiliations change, he no longer believes that naming isn't important and becomes more integrated in the Irish community. He becomes a go-between with the English people who he is working with and the Irish people who are part of his heritage. Although he wants to be liked and respected by the English for his work, he also feels a sense of duty and loyalty towards his family and the people of the Baile Beag community and begins to realise how important naming and language is to these people. Towards the end of the play it becomes apparent that there is a change in Owen's personality and he begins to act more like Manus, as although he is still working with the English at some level he is also teaching the local community at the hedge school. Owen is a successful businessman whose job is to translate for the English and turn Irish place names into English. At first he is keen to get the job done and although his partner in the job Yolland is having second thoughts Owen dismisses his opinions. Yolland realises that the tradition of place names is important but Owen chooses not to believe this and tries to justify his actions by saying that most

  • Word count: 1096
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Utopian Socialists

Danielle Risner 3rd AP Euro Hist .Appearing as they did in the first quarter of the 19th century, it is necessary to identify the Utopian Socialists according to how perceptively they understood and dealt with the massive challenge of industrial society. In this regard, it was Charles Fourier, Saint-Simon, and Own who seemed to have the most impact . It was Charles Fourier, who seems to have been the most utopian of the Utopian Socialists. What I mean by this is that although Fourier was aware of what was happening in England as a result of the Industrial Revolution, he rejected industrialism wholesale. He despised laissez-faire liberalism and the factory system not because of what effects they might have on human society, but because he believed that industrial society was a passing phase. He saw no need to rectify the dangers inherent in industrialism. He simply went beyond industrialism by ignoring it. Fourier's ideas seem quite fantastical and without ground in reality. Indeed, there is much in Fourier's writing that is pure nonsense. Yes, like some of the representatives of the early French communist movement, Fourier exhibits that almost characteristic pretension of the visionary: contradictory, confused, repetitive, chaotic and, of course, long-winded. Fourier wanted to elevate the status of manual labor, to rescue it from a long-standing tradition of

  • Word count: 1068
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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"Enslaved": An Explicative Analysis.

Camille Y. Gomez @01117935 African-American Poetry "Enslaved" Revision 03/02/04 "Enslaved": An Explicative Analysis Claude McKay's "Enslaved" discusses exactly what the title suggests, slavery. In this poem, McKay utilizes repetition of various hard and soft consonant sounds to contribute to the general theme of oppressive white power over the despondent blacks. One of the most noticeable patterns in the poem is the constant hissing sound produced by the "s" in various words in each line. This hissing sound generates the image of a snake in the reader's mind. Oh when I think of my long-suffering race In this line, the poet uses the words "suffering" and "race" in their connotative meaning to emphasize the importance of this opening line. These two words now assume different qualities, those of a slithering snake. For weary centuries despised, oppressed, The poet is taking the reader on a journey; the snake is the tour guide. In this line the repetition of the hissing sound is heard in the words "centuries", "despised", and "oppressed". However, the poet also introduces contrast between soft sounds and hard sounds. The "d" sound in contrast with the "s" sound represents the contrast between the white oppressors and the enslaved blacks. Enslaved and lynched, denied a human place The contrast between hard and soft (blacks and whites) continues. The reader

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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How important is landscape in some of the literature you have studied on the Great War?

How important is landscape in some of the literature you have studied on the Great War? In 1914 world war one had only just begun. The style of poetry was changing and more poets were beginning to establish themselves. These poets contributed to a new anthology called 'Georgian poetry'. These poems contained a lot about the physical aspects of England and especially the green, pastoral ideal of England. These poems became not just descriptions of England but the very reason soldiers were so willing to fight. The earth and landscape embodied all that the soldiers were fighting for. Because of this the landscape of England became a symbol that was predominant in many war poems. Ivor Gurney used a lot of important imagery in his poems. 'To his Love' and 'Near Vermand' are two poems I will look at of his. In the poem 'To his Love' the speaker talks about the Cotswolds, this giving the pastoral, idyllic image of England. 'Where the sheep feed quietly and take no head', this line gives a very peaceful and tranquil image and creates a large contrast of the war. This theme continues with a very calm and natural image as it goes on, 'on Severn river under the blue'. The colloquial language used also emphasises the fact of the unspoiled image of the landscape around them. The 'violets of pride, purple from Severn side' are used very effectively contrasting with the harshness of the

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen and Could You Not Write Otherwise? by Alan Paton.

INTRODUCTION Poems are one of the oldest forms of literature and it is one such form of literature that has evolved with the passage of time but has never been abundant. Poem is one of those forms of literature that surpasses the history of written texts (Horálek, 2019). It has been seen and discovered that poetry was employed by the people in the earlier generation as a way of oral history and genealogy as well as law. It is safe to say that writing poetry needs a strong understanding of the English language. However, the question that arises is what is the purpose of poetry? and what should a poet be writing about? This paper will try and answer these questions with the help of two poem namely, “Dulce et Decorum” and “Could you not write otherwise?” (Malaba, 2015). DISCUSSION The poem by Wilfred Owen titled “Dulce et Decorum” (1920) is a war poem and unlike many other war poems that came during the time when Owen was writing, this poem criticizes war and talks about the horror of war. The main purpose of writing a poem in the first place is to convey the innate feelings of the poet and this poem exactly does the same. Owen was a soldier himself which means he had first-hand experience of war and battlefield. The poem brings to light the struggle a soldier has to go through in their everyday life which is hardly talked about by any of the poets

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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A critical appreciation of the poem 'Exposure'

A critical appreciation of the poem 'Exposure' I believe in Wilfred Owens' poem 'Exposure', there are many different purposes, and an equal number of methods, which he employs to achieve them. Throughout the poem, he uses a variety of different techniques but I think there are several which are most successful. The first and foremost approach Owen has used is that of the title, 'Exposure'. Exposure means to 'Lay open to the weather'; it suggests being uncomfortable, and susceptible to the weather, typically in a less than desirable situation. In this poem, it is the weather that torments the soldiers most, and so this title is appropriate. This title is also clever and evocative, because it causes the reader to think about the contents of the poem before having read it. I consider the reference to nature, in particular, to be very important and effective. It is expressed clearly, in a physical sense, in the first line of the first stanza, although Owen does continue this use throughout the poem. 'Our brains ache, in the merciless iced east winds that knive us...' This line shows the 'merciless'/evil wind, nature, to have premeditated causing a pain to the soldiers. This, and that the wind causes a physical pain, 'ache', to the soldiers personifies the weather. The diction in this line, for example, the repetition of s sounds, called sibilance, represents the sound of the

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Critical Evaluation of Friel's presentation of Owen (Page 78- 88).

Danielle de Bruin 12RS English Literature- Translations 15.10.03 - Critical Evaluation of Friel's presentation of Owen (Page 78- 88) Owen is a rounded character in the play. His disposition changes, and at the end of the play he has a completely different attitude to the way he started out. The section of the play that this evaluation covers (Pages 78-88) highlights these changes which are catalysed by the disappearance of Yolland, and the departure of Manus. Owen seems to evolve into the role of responsibility previously held by Manus. He gets his father's tea, and shows concern for Hugh and Jimmy Jack's drunkard state. He shows genuine compassion for Sarah. On page 83, after Sarah is frightened by Captain Lancey, he comforts and reassures her. There is a subtle change in Owen's attitude towards Manus. When Doalty refers to Manus as a "stupid bloody fool" for running away, Own says, "I told him that." This shows his concern for his brother, since he advised him to stay and defend himself. Also, when Lancey asks about Manus' whereabouts, Owen blatantly lies saying that he is at a wake. He directly defies the English in order to protect his brother, and hopefully buy him some more time. When Captain Lancey enters to inform them on the course of action in response to the disappearance of Yolland, Owen is shocked at the coldness and detachment of his

  • Word count: 768
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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