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  1. Black Feminism in Alice Walkers "The Color Purple".

    She wants to liberate them from the injustices inflicted upon them by the most rigid, sexual, social and racial gender roles perpetrated in the white dominant patriarchal society. This paper seeks to analyse Alice Walker as an author who embodies her own particular vision of black feminism in a work that transcends ideology by using the novel The Color Purple. Additionally, we will analyse the literary features/ style as presented in the novel. In an attempt to embody her own particular vision of Black Feminism and to name her philosophy, Alice Walker describes herself as a "Womanist" rather than a feminist because Womanism is better than Feminism.

    • Word count: 7004

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Examining the passages below, compare and contrast the representations of the heroines choice at the end Wide Sargasso Sea and Jane Eyre.

    "In conclusion, Rhys and Bronte represent their heroines in very different lights. Jane would have been viewed as defiant by the Victorian audience, but her ‘happy ending’ will have satisfied their projections of domestic bliss between husband and wife. However, Rhys created the kind of woman who might have been reviled by the same audience; one who was a social outcast, celebrated her sexuality and femininity and embodied insane destruction. The endings of each novel rely on the social, moral and gender conventions of the time; each making a comment on the society in which these women lived."

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