Daddy-Long-Legs (p.13 - 36)

Daddy-Long-Legs (p.13 - 36) Recall To recall from where we left off last time, here are some of the interesting facts about the story. Jerusha Abbott - the oldest orphan (p. 1) - seventeen years-old (p. 3) - not only a student but also a helper in the orphanage. (p. 6) - wrote an essay titled, "the Blue Wednesday" (p. 7) - needs to write a letter of acknowledgement to Mr. John Smith once a month (p. 8) Asylum / Orphanage House - 97 orphans (p. 1) - Mrs. Lippett is the matron of the asylum - The name of the asylum is "John Grier Home" (p. 9) Mr. John Smith (Daddy Long-Legs) - Visits the asylum on the first Wednesday of every month (p. 1) - Affluential trustee of the asylum (p. 5) - Plans to educate Jerusha at college for young ladies with the hope that she may become a writer (p. 8) - Might write to Jerusha if she gets expelled from college. (p. 9) New Adventure I gave you a question yesterday asking you to find out the new things that Jerusha encountered after she left the asylum. What have you got? Q: Why did college life so strange to Jerusha? What new things did she discover? After she left the asylum, what was the first new thing that she discovered? A train. (p. 13: "... I travelled yesterday for four hours in a train. ... I never rode in one before.) Then, she came to the college. What was her first impression about the college? - The

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Study the short stories of both Raymond Carver and John Cheever, address the theme of masculinity which runs throughout both of the author's stories.

It is my intention within this essay to study the short stories of both Raymond Carver and John Cheever, in doing so I propose to address the theme of masculinity which runs throughout both of the author's stories. I shall do this by considering, among other things, such subjects as Post Modernism, Dirty Realism and social climate and how these are applied to the texts Boxes and Elephant, by Carver and The Season of Divorce by Cheever. The background in which both Carver and Cheever write, is very significant to the way in which both writer's male characters are emasculated within the stories. Carver was writing in the decade of the eighties, and as such Reaganite economics had much to do with the way in which the men lost their grip on the hunter gatherer stereotype which had preceded. The traditional role of the male shifted from heavy industrial work to more emasculated work, such as secretarial/office roles, and domestic captivity therefore diminishing their agency. On top of this many men became jobless due to redundancies concerned with this shift from a blue-collar society to a white-collar society, and so this domestic captivity was enhanced. It is such men who Carver writes about in his short stories. The men who have slipped out of this "traditional male breadwinning world" Cheever again, writes men relevant to the political climate in which he both lived and

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Discuss the image of the doubled female in Charlotte Bront's Shirley, Villette and Jane Eyre.

Discuss the image of the doubled female in Charlotte Brontë's Shirley, Villette and Jane Eyre. The central theme of Jane Eyre, Villette and Shirley lies within the complex issue of the doubled female. Brontë persistently returns to this theme in order to vocalise her personal fears on the representations and expectations of the woman in a patriarchal society. As Jennifer Gribble suggests, this vocalising is apparent through, 'a recurrence of images and patterns that seem to define prevalent social and cultural beliefs and traditions.'1 In order to portray the strain under which women were placed in the nineteenth century, Brontë repeatedly fractures the emotional and physical state of her protagonists and in doing so 'explore(s) the potentialities and limits of a central reflecting consciousness.'2 This fracturing of the self creates the 'double female' in these novels, the female as consciously and emotionally split, either implicitly through the mirroring of the self by other characters, for example Caroline and Shirley or metaphorically, for example Jane and Bertha. Brontë seeks to illustrate in Shirley, Jane Eyre and Villette the impossibility of obtaining knowledge of self and of reclaiming self hood, faced by all of her female characters. In doing so, Charlotte Brontë viscously attacks not only patriarchy, but also the actual act of defining the woman, and suggests

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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In the light of these two critical readings, discus the presentation of the unnamed Rochester in 'Wide Sargasso Sea'.

In the light of these two critical readings, discus the presentation of the unnamed Rochester in 'Wide Sargasso Sea'. Is he really a character that 'wields' 'economic and legal power, uninformed by compassion' or is he 'not portrayed as an evil tyrant but as a proud and bigoted younger brother betrayed by his family into a loveless marriage'? Rhys' novel presents the opportunity for an alternative account of Rochester's marriage to be presented. Rhys gives Antoinette Cosway the chance to present her feelings and views and confronts the unexplored issues from 'Jane Eyre' liberating all that is contained, to give an alternative view and make the reasoning behind Bertha evident. In not naming Rochester Rhys refuses him an identity as he later refuses Antoinette. It distances him from the reader and from Rhys' own opinion forcing us to form our own and weigh up his actions to see whether he is vindictive or victimised. The novel neglects the linear autobiographical narrative, preferring the trisect form where parts one and three are attributed to Antoinette and part two is Rochester's which dominates the novel. The disjointed narrative juxtaposes the conflicting opinions to create an overall impression of Rochester's marriage. These allows Rhys to open out the narrow views of events in 'Jane Eyre' and gives the reader an awareness of cultural differences and have sympathy

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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In Sons and Lovers how does Lawrence challenge conventional attitudes towards social and sexual relationships and what effect does this have on the narrative?

In Sons and Lovers how does Lawrence challenge conventional attitudes towards social and sexual relationships and what effect does this have on the narrative? Social and sexual relationships are integral themes in Lawrence's semi-autobiographical novel. Sons and Lovers can be described as a modernist text due to the unconventional relationship between the novel's protagonist, Paul Morel and it's heroine, Mrs Morel. This essay will discuss the effect of this love and the social conflicts on the narrative. The novel begins with the chapter, 'The early married life of the Morels', and discusses the transformation of Walter Morel and Gertrude Morel's marriage. This can be seen by Gertrude Coppard's initial attraction to Walter's carefree nature, 'He came and bowed above her. A warmth radiated through her as if she had drunk wine' (p. 10) and their eventual hatred and fear of one another, '"Why, nobody but a nasty little bitch like you 'ud 'ave such a thought."'(p. 22). The breakdown in the relationship, is imperative to the narrative as it identifies Mr Morel as a violent husband, and Mr Mrs Morel as a strong, virtuous victim. This is illustrated when a violent, drunken Mr Morel, locks his pregnant wife outside in the cold. However, more objectively, both parties are bitter and violent to one another, '"Ah, wouldn't I, wouldn't I have gone long ago, but for those children"' (p.

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  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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The Metamorphosis:The Potrait Of Kafka's Life

The Metamorphosis: The Potrait Of Kafka's Life By Vishal S Shah -- 4/01 The Metamorphosis written by Franz Kafka is considered one of the few great, poetic works of the twentieth century. Addressing The Metamorphosis, Elias Canetti, a Nobel Prize-winning author, has commented, "In The Metamorphosis Kafka has reached the height of his mastery: he has written something which he could never surpass, because there is nothing which The Metamorphosis could be surpassed by - one of the few great, perfect poetic works of this century" (http://www.mala.bc.ca/~mcneil/m4lec5a.htm). There are many symbolisms and parallelisms used in the story. "[Kafka's] disturbing, symbolic fiction, especially The Metamorphosis, written in German, [not] only prefigures the oppression and despair of the late 20th century" but also is an account of the dramatic transformations that had occurred during his own life ("Kafka Franz", Funk?, 2000). This beautifully written masterpiece of Kafka's is clearly symbolic of his own life and nightmare-like life experiences he had with his father. "Suppose all that you have always valued in your life was shown to be an illusion. What if your precious beliefs, maxims, platitudes, and traditions were inverted and distorted beyond recognition? You suddenly realize that what is good is bad; what is beauty is foul; what is virtue, vice. What if all your points of

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This essay attempts to examine and analyze the autobiographical links in Kafka's fiction Metamorphosis and The Judgment, with particular focus on the techniques employed by the author to execute this feat.

Dr. Ill: Basically, you talented sick mind... you used writing as "self torture to bring about personal healing." You grew to expect and appreciate your father's abuse didn't you? Without it, there was less inspiration - so much less need for catharsis ... you sick, sick man. Kafka: Nooo... You are vrong! Eet vas hisss vault... my Vatherr!!! This extract came from a humorous interview-presentation and refers to the Austrian writer Franz Kafka. However, the fact that this man's traumatic life is depicted in and impacts upon his work so strongly is no laughing matter. This essay attempts to examine and analyze the autobiographical links in Kafka's fiction Metamorphosis and The Judgment, with particular focus on the techniques employed by the author to execute this feat. Upon reading Metamorphosis, the first thing the reader notices is the dismal imagery used by Kafka; the dull, gloomy and humid environment serving to foreshadow the decay and deterioration of Gregor's life. Additionally the newspaper Gregor's father uses, creates the imagery of a man chasing an insect. This is ironic because it is the constant work on the part of Gregor that supports the buying of that said newspaper, and it is this work that transforms Gregor into vermin. The exploitation at the hands of the oppressive bourgeois culture of his world, robs him of his humanity, thus turning him into a creature

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Do the texts wide sargasso sea and pygmalion seem to present a straightforward contrast between male figures of authority and passive women ?

Do the texts wide sargasso sea and pygmalion seem to present a straightforward contrast between male figures of authority and passive women ? The two texts being referred to , in answer to the question are the play Pygmalion by Shaw, and the novel Wide Sargasso Sea by Rhys. Each piece of literature will be discussed individually, with any distinct contrasts between the two noted. The first text is the play written by George Bernard Shaw , Pygmalion , in 1912, and the two main characters being considered are that of Henry Higgins , and Eliza Doolittle. From the play, we can glean a lot of information about these characters , their attitudes, morals , beliefs, physical and mental attributes , basically everything which makes them , to the reader or audience, more human. A play has the bonus in that much can be given about such points in the stage notes, something which Shaw was very particular over . The directions given to the actors help to illustrate their moods and behaviour , as it is written as a guide, rather than as part of the story line . Looking more closely at Higgins' character, it can be easy to ascertain if he is a male figure of authority. His appearance and character are described in the stage notes to act 2 , which become clearer throughout the act. It states he is a bully, and can be petulant. His manner is robust and direct, and

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  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Villete by Charlotte Bronte.

Katie Dineen English Novel Professor Morse February 25, 2003 Villete by Charlotte Bronte Charlotte Bronte's Villette is the story of Lucy Snowe. After leading a rather tragic life, initially dominated by repression and loneliness, Lucy has taken it upon herself to write her memoirs, and give her personal testament. Standing at the dusk of her life she is able to look back and provide an objective account of herself and those significant in her rather unusual life. Her writings are dominated by the use of natural imagery, which are used by Lucy to portray the personalities, feelings and emotions of her those around her. The imagery, and the relationship with nature it implies, is also an important barometer of Lucy's own reactions to the situations in which she finds herself. As narrator, Lucy Snowe frequently uses animal imagery, to describe other people. The frivolous and vain Ginevra Fanshawe is initially likened to a "hummingbird" and a "butterfly", but as Lucy grows less tolerant towards her, she is presented as a "mealy-winged moth". Polly, perching on the end of her bed, is described as a "white bird", although Lucy also thinks of her as possessing the "supple softness" and "velvet grace" of a kitten. Mme. Beck's furtive ways are compared to those of a "cat", but Lucy will later say that she is as "strict as a dragon". The bestial qualities ascribed to

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  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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The Role of Education in Charlotte Bront(TM)s Jane Eyre

Essay-The Role of Education in Charlotte Brontë's "Jane Eyre" Done by Diana Griciuviene Af 0606 U Charlote Brontë in her romantic novel Jane Eyre presents factual information and attitudes toward education in the19th century England. As far as is known, during this period people experienced the harmful effects of severe class division typical of the era. At all levels of society boys and girls were taught separately. The children of poor or workingclass families were taught in local schools and the children of upper and upper-middle-class families were enrolled in exclusive private schools (known as public schools). Additionaly, young children in upper-class and upper-middle-class families - both boys and girls - often received their earliest education from governesses. In other words, before 1870, education was largely a private affair. Throughout the novel, we can explore Jane's own education at one of the Victorian charity school , her work in education at one of the local school, her position as a governess and beneficial consequences of the education also. The Lowood School for girls, portrayed in this novel, can be described as one, which curriculum was designed particularly to train children to a lower-middle class occupation, such as becoming a governess or a school teacher, unlike private schooling for upper-class girls, which focused much more on acting like

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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