In Sons and Lovers how does Lawrence challenge conventional attitudes towards social and sexual relationships and what effect does this have on the narrative?

In Sons and Lovers how does Lawrence challenge conventional attitudes towards social and sexual relationships and what effect does this have on the narrative? Social and sexual relationships are integral themes in Lawrence's semi-autobiographical novel. Sons and Lovers can be described as a modernist text due to the unconventional relationship between the novel's protagonist, Paul Morel and it's heroine, Mrs Morel. This essay will discuss the effect of this love and the social conflicts on the narrative. The novel begins with the chapter, 'The early married life of the Morels', and discusses the transformation of Walter Morel and Gertrude Morel's marriage. This can be seen by Gertrude Coppard's initial attraction to Walter's carefree nature, 'He came and bowed above her. A warmth radiated through her as if she had drunk wine' (p. 10) and their eventual hatred and fear of one another, '"Why, nobody but a nasty little bitch like you 'ud 'ave such a thought."'(p. 22). The breakdown in the relationship, is imperative to the narrative as it identifies Mr Morel as a violent husband, and Mr Mrs Morel as a strong, virtuous victim. This is illustrated when a violent, drunken Mr Morel, locks his pregnant wife outside in the cold. However, more objectively, both parties are bitter and violent to one another, '"Ah, wouldn't I, wouldn't I have gone long ago, but for those children"' (p.

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, Mansfield Park by Jane Austen, and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte-present an indispensable contribution into the world literature of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century.

Three brilliant novels-The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, Mansfield Park by Jane Austen, and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte-present an indispensable contribution into the world literature of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. All of them are written by the authors who earned their fame with a great number of literary works, and are full with emotions caused by numerous social interrelationships of the heroes. The aforementioned works by the stated above authors are full with lively situations that help to a great extent understand and analyze the real similar situations that happened in the lives of the readers. The Metamorphosis is a story by Franz Kafka about a man named Gregor Samsa who one day wakes up to find himself "changed in his bed into a monstrous vermin". The mutation occurs the night before in his "unsettling dreams" and appears to be solely physical because Gregor maintains all of his human mental capacities. At the beginning of the novel Gregor works in a company as a traveling salesman. He hates his job, but he is forced to work there in order to support his family-his father who became bankrupt, his mother, and his sister Grete, who was the closest person for him in the world. Gregor may be in separation emotionally from his family before his metamorphosis even takes place. Gregor's locked door indicates that Gregor was previously removed from

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Do the texts wide sargasso sea and pygmalion seem to present a straightforward contrast between male figures of authority and passive women ?

Do the texts wide sargasso sea and pygmalion seem to present a straightforward contrast between male figures of authority and passive women ? The two texts being referred to , in answer to the question are the play Pygmalion by Shaw, and the novel Wide Sargasso Sea by Rhys. Each piece of literature will be discussed individually, with any distinct contrasts between the two noted. The first text is the play written by George Bernard Shaw , Pygmalion , in 1912, and the two main characters being considered are that of Henry Higgins , and Eliza Doolittle. From the play, we can glean a lot of information about these characters , their attitudes, morals , beliefs, physical and mental attributes , basically everything which makes them , to the reader or audience, more human. A play has the bonus in that much can be given about such points in the stage notes, something which Shaw was very particular over . The directions given to the actors help to illustrate their moods and behaviour , as it is written as a guide, rather than as part of the story line . Looking more closely at Higgins' character, it can be easy to ascertain if he is a male figure of authority. His appearance and character are described in the stage notes to act 2 , which become clearer throughout the act. It states he is a bully, and can be petulant. His manner is robust and direct, and

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Essay on the key theme of alienation in the first two parts of the novel.Wide Sargasso Sea

Essay on the key theme of alienation in the first two parts of the novel. Wide Sargasso Sea The theme f alienation runs deep at the core of this novel and is presented as being overt and covert, physical and emotional, social and existential. The first two parts of Wide Sargasso Sea are narrated by the two central protagonists respectively, both of whom experience and deal with alienation in different ways. However, neither narrator really belongs to their surroundings and this sense of not having a defined identity and not fitting in is key to the theme of alienation. Part 1 of Wide Sargasso Sea is narrated exclusively by the central protagonist, Antoinette Cosway. 'The Paper Tiger Lunatic' of Jane Eyre, Antoinette is here given a voice and a background that will help the reader understand her subsequent decline into madness. Physical, social, and emotional alienation in her childhood are shown to be at the root of her later insanity. All three facets of alienation in her childhood are shown to be at the root of her later insanity. All three facets of alienation are present on the opening page of the novel. Firstly it is clear that the family has been socially ostracized by white Jamaican society. The military metaphor, "they say when trouble comes close ranks, and so the white people did. But we were not in their ranks..." suggests that they are living in a society at

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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How does Charlotte Bronte build up tension? Using chapter 23 to illustrate.

How does Charlotte Bronte build up tension? Using chapter 23 to illustrate. Charlotte Bronte wrote Jane Eyre in 1847. Throughout this novel Bronte criticises and challenges some views and believes that she experienced herself within the injustice of the Victorian society. In this essay I am going to use chapter 23 to show how tension is built up in terms of language, feelings and symbols. Firstly, I'm going to include a brief summery of the plot and at the same time highlight the main characters I'll be working with. Secondly, I will include the history of the time the book was written in and comment on how it links with the story. Finally, I am going to point out and explain the many different techniques Bronte uses to build up tension. Jane Eyre opens with the narrator, the adult Jane Eyre recalling her childhood experiences growing up as an orphan at Gateshead, the home of her unfriendly aunt, and her children. Jane is always wrongly punished, she was even sent away to Lowwood charity school where pupils are treated appallingly. There she passes six years as a student, then two as a teacher. After that Jane becomes a governess at Thornfield, owned by Mr. Rochester. Jane falls in love with her master and Rochester asks Jane to marry him, she agreed. On the day of their marriage Jane discovers that Rochester is already married, she then refuses to be Rochester's mistress

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Through her stories, "The Yellow Wallpaper" and "Making a Change," Charlotte Perkins Gilman portrays two contrasting views of women in similarly restrictive circumstances.

Stella Dubish ENG243 Dr. S. Orr, Professor April 20, 2001 The Choice Through her stories, "The Yellow Wallpaper" and "Making a Change," Charlotte Perkins Gilman portrays two contrasting views of women in similarly restrictive circumstances. Both the women are young mothers with creative talents that are being squelched by their husbands and families. The difference lies in what the two women do within these contexts. While one woman takes control of the situation, ultimately renewing and empowering herself, the other submits to the forces pushing against her, eventually going crazy. In "The Yellow Wallpaper," a woman, Jane, struggles for mental independence. She has been diagnosed with "temporary nervous depression" by her husband, who is a doctor. She purports, however, that she is neither nervous nor depressed. She simply wants mental and social stimulation, both of which are not being allowed her because of her "condition." Instead of receiving visitors and enjoying the countryside, Jane is confined to a room that used to be a nursery. This is just one of the evidences of how she is treated like a child throughout the whole story. The one characteristic of the room that haunts Jane is the wallpaper - it is yellow, grotesque and glaring. She spends her spare time watching it and writing about it. The color and pattern intrigue her so much that she cannot

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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The function of landscape or the environment in Jane Eyre.

Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre The function of landscape or the environment in Jane Eyre. ***** We must first distinguish between the above options. 'Landscape' seems more restrictive to terms of geography than 'environment', which, as the focus of this essay, I am interpreting as referring to physical surroundings and their effect in creating intangible environmental aspects of the social, spiritual, and atmospheric. Ostensibly this could include certain elements of landscape, and I will be discussing some brief relevant descriptions in the context of environment as a more holistic concept. So to what purpose does Brontë put her description of environment in Jane Eyre? According to Delia da Sousa Correa, we are made aware from the offset of the novel of the 'intense relationship... between the description of external conditions and the portrayal of individual thoughts and feelings' which 'establishes Jane's consciousness at the centre of the narrative'. How each 'external description conveys Jane's...feelings' and also how they foreshadow later events and settings. Brontë's use of imagery and symbolism in her description of environment is integral to the novel. She uses the setting to further the reader's appreciation of Jane's inner feelings, physically expressing, complimenting, and intensifying her emotions. The autobiographical first person narrative style of Jane

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Pygmalion's title harkened from its predecessor, Ovid's Pygmalion which accounted a woman-hating sculptor falling in love with his own sculpture of his desired image. Wide Sargasso Sea referred to the sea surrounding Dominica, the setting of Jean Rhys's

Lek Susan SIM-OUC PI No.: K0503345 12th August 2005 TMA 07 George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion was about Higgins, a phonetics expert, who, as a kind of social experiment, attempts to make a duchess out of an uneducated Cockney flower-girl, Eliza. Pygmalion followed some traditional rules. First, the play was based on Eliza's transformation as the main theme. Higgins claimed he could pass Eliza off as a duchess in three months. (Block 5, page 14) Secondly, the virtual sixth act, the ball, was inserted in the book but was absent from the stage version. Shaw understood the essence of traditional convention by excluding the ball which was extravagant and technically taxing. (Block 5, page 11) Lastly, Pygmalion also conformed to the traditional five-act structure which allowed breakdown of actions into five balanced sections: beginning (first act), development (second act), climax (third act), turning-point (fourth act) and denouement (fifth act). (Block 5, page 12) The adage said, "Familiarity breeds contempt." Shaw avoided the familiar 'Cinderella' and 'wedding-bells' ending for Higgins and Eliza. Shaw included the fairy-tale formula but excluded the romantic ending as he hated to be predictable. (Block 5, page 32) Shaw's play was realistic and economical. Firstly, he chose to rise the curtain on an empty stage thrice to achieve an elaborated, unusual and real-looking

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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The Use of Point of View in The Metamorphosis and A Hero of Our Time

Jamie Marks Language A1: WL Assignment #1 November 8, 2002 0250-063 Word Count: 1,487 The Use of Point of View in The Metamorphosis and A Hero of Our Time The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka and A Hero of Our Time by Mikhail Lermontov are both insightful and unique commentaries on human nature. Though the works are from entirely different times and cultures, both function to investigate and express the authors' cynicism of social convention. The Metamorphosis gives a vivid account of the repression suffered by its protagonist, while A Hero of Our Time offers a first hand look inside the mind of the oppressor himself. Kafka and Lermontov use point of view to illicit strong emotions from the reader in order to underscore man's inherent need to control and manipulate others. Kafka uses a third person limited point of view to create sympathy for the protagonist by showing the effect the controlling and repressive disposition of his family has on him. Throughout the entire text, the narration is extremely detached, but as the novella progresses it shows more insight into the devastating effects the actions of Gregor's family are having on him. Initially, the prose is alarmingly dispassionate, creating shock within the reader. Gregor has turned into a "monstrous vermin," and yet the narrator shows no emotional or vivid response from Gregor at all (Kafka 3). The Marks

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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The Image of the book in Jane Eyre is associated with power and possession. John Reed asserts his authority and property rights over Jane and rather surprisingly the objects he focuses on are his books:

Pursue a single image (for example hands, water, books) or a single topic (for example, religion, illness, travel) in one of the set texts, constructing a case about the text on the basis of what you know. Books in Jane Eyre. The Image of the book in Jane Eyre is associated with power and possession. John Reed asserts his authority and property rights over Jane and rather surprisingly the objects he focuses on are his books: You have no business to take our books: you are a dependant, mama says; you have no money; your father left you none: Now I'll teach you to rummage my bookshelves: for they are mine; all the house belongs to me, or will do in a few years time.1 John Reed has just forced Jane away from her only means of escape: reading. It is an interesting idea: possession of the word equates with possession of power. Jane resists such an arbitrary display of power and does so time and time again by being associated with the presence of books and as such, possession and control of language. We first see this when Jane steals a few moments to become absorbed in the written word: With Bewick on my knee I was happy: happy at least in my way. I feared nothing but interruption, and that came too soon. (p.9) But the Reeds deny Jane access to books and even attack her with them (p.11). The reader is aware that Jane has much to fear but lost in her fantasy world, she

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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