Feelin' Like a Bug!

Brian Zamora English 1B Mr. Haley 3 January 2005 Feelin' Like a Bug! Bugs are everywhere and you can't avoid them. Whether you love them, or you hate them, one thing is certain, you can't live without them. The Webster dictionary defines the bug as an insect that have sucking mouthparts, forewings thickened at the base, and incomplete metamorphosis and are often economic pests. Being a pest is just one of their many qualities of being a bug. Bugs are also known to be worthless, sheltered, disease carrying vermin's. Another living creature that shares the same qualities of bugs is humans. Humans are also known to be worthless, dirty, and also spread a lot of disease. The author Franz Kafka reflects the characteristics of humans in his short story, "Metamorphosis," in which he captures the vermin-like qualities as a symbol of self-portrayal. In the story "Metamorphosis", Gregor Samsa undergoes a sense of worthlessness from his family and employer. Kafka portrays this feeling of worthlessness by turning him into a cockroach. Cockroaches are depicted as ugly valueless arthropods. We have no idea why they exist and what their purpose in life really is. When we see a cockroach, our first reaction is a feeling of disgust and our only intention is to exterminate the hideous creature. Take for example the hit TV game show, Fear Factor. In order to achieve high ratings from their

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Compare and Contrast the Techniques Used by Bronte in Describing Thornfiled Hall in Chapter 11, with those used by Woolf in Describing London in the Early Pages of Mrs. Dalloway

Compare and Contrast the Techniques Used by Bronte in Describing Thornfiled Hall in Chapter 11, with those used by Woolf in Describing London in the Early Pages of Mrs. Dalloway? Jane Eyre's tone is both gothic and romantic, often conjuring an atmosphere of mystery and secrecy. Her description of Thornfield in chapter 11, is very Victorian and thorough, which draws us into the novel. On page 122 of Chapter 11, when approaching the third floor, Jane uses a visual first person narrative text. When Bronte writes, "Mrs Fairfax stayed behind a moment to fasten the trap-door", she is giving us an aspect of ambiguity, the word 'fasten' emphasises the refusal of entry. The description of the staircase in Thornfield Hall illustrates the rigid and constricted atmosphere, as they are described as 'the narrow garret staircase'. Bronte uses alliteration when stating, "lingered in the long passage", to emphasise the description of her movement in the surroundings. The phrase 'separating' used in the passage exemplifies the secrecy within Thornfield, which also intrigues us. The use of semicolons and commas in the passage, adds to the appeal of Thornifield, illustrated when Bronte writes, "the third story; narrow, low, and dim". These techniques disrupt the flow of the sentence to show the fascination and anxiety that she has for the attic. This allows the structure of the sentence to be

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Daddy-Long-Legs (p.13 - 36)

Daddy-Long-Legs (p.13 - 36) Recall To recall from where we left off last time, here are some of the interesting facts about the story. Jerusha Abbott - the oldest orphan (p. 1) - seventeen years-old (p. 3) - not only a student but also a helper in the orphanage. (p. 6) - wrote an essay titled, "the Blue Wednesday" (p. 7) - needs to write a letter of acknowledgement to Mr. John Smith once a month (p. 8) Asylum / Orphanage House - 97 orphans (p. 1) - Mrs. Lippett is the matron of the asylum - The name of the asylum is "John Grier Home" (p. 9) Mr. John Smith (Daddy Long-Legs) - Visits the asylum on the first Wednesday of every month (p. 1) - Affluential trustee of the asylum (p. 5) - Plans to educate Jerusha at college for young ladies with the hope that she may become a writer (p. 8) - Might write to Jerusha if she gets expelled from college. (p. 9) New Adventure I gave you a question yesterday asking you to find out the new things that Jerusha encountered after she left the asylum. What have you got? Q: Why did college life so strange to Jerusha? What new things did she discover? After she left the asylum, what was the first new thing that she discovered? A train. (p. 13: "... I travelled yesterday for four hours in a train. ... I never rode in one before.) Then, she came to the college. What was her first impression about the college? - The

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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In the beginning of the Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka Grete plays a very important role in the life of Gregor.

In the beginning of the Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka Grete plays a very important role in the life of Gregor. Grete is portrayed as a loving and devoted sister with an amazing musical talent. Her seemingly strong bond to her brother remains even after Gregor's transformation. She shows her devotion when she takes sole responsibility as Gregor's caretaker and only provider. She cleans up after him and assures he is fed each day. By doing this she still seems to care for her brother despite his condition. It is also Grete that comes up with the idea to move out all of Gregor's furniture so that he may have more space to move around his room more freely. However as the novel progresses Grete becomes more and more distant and begins to drift away from her brother. One can notice that Grete seems to have done all this work and cared for Gregor only out of family duty rather than for actual human relations. It is almost as though she has to pay back Gregor for all he has done but money is the only reason she is doing this. This shows us one noticeable theme in this novel: how money drives us as people. Our whole world is based around money just as the case for the Samsas. When Gregor becomes ill he hears his sister weeping in the room next to him and he reasons, thinking "why was she crying? Because he wouldn't get up and let the chief clerk in, because he was in danger of loosing

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  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Journal 1 – The Metamorphosis

Jean Benoit Lauzon 05/11/01 English journals - Kafka Journal 1 - The Metamorphosis The opening paragraph of this short story begins with the introduction of Gregor Samsa as a newly transformed insect. The narrator's intent in regards to this brusque stating of Gregor's new physical shape, is perhaps to convey Gregor's own surprised and confused feelings into the reader's mind. The narrator seems to anticipate what the reader is thinking, as he immediately states that Gregor is transformed, and what shape he now possesses. The narrator pushes his description to unfolding the exact contours of Gregor's body. He takes the perspective of Gregor, looking down on his own body, perhaps to heighten the vividness and brutal psychological shock of the first vision of his "numerous legs, which were pitifully thin compared to the rest of his bulk, waved helplessly before his eyes." The reader is thus enabled, through this first-person point-of-view, to visualise that precise image, which inherently helps the reader better understand the effect of the transformation through Gregor's perspective. The paragraph detailing Gregor's metamorphosis is followed by a description of his room and of his non-bug life. The reader notices that where the first paragraph was leaning towards structure and a coherent and precise description of Gregor, this paragraph seems to consist of

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Moral Conscience vs. Church Doctrine

Loresa D. Matarazzo Response Paper, Question #3 Principles of Lit. Study 350:220 July 21, 2004 Moral Conscience vs. Church Doctrine Contemporary readers would likely disagree with Elizabeth Rigby's assertion that Jane Eyre is an "anti-Christian composition;" however, in light of the prevailing religious doctrine of the Evangelical movement and turmoil regarding same during the mid-1800's, one can easily under-stand Ms. Rigby's reasoning for this indictment at the time. There are at least three characters within the novel associated with Christianity; namely-Mr. Brocklehurst, Helen Burns and St. John Rivers, and it is made clear in the text that Jane refuses to pledge herself to the doctrine espoused by any of them. It is not difficult to object to Mr. Brocklehurst's hypocrisy and to find him detestable. With regard to Helen Burns, it is impossible not to develop fond feelings for her, but it is also not possible to ignore Jane's skepticism with regard to Helen's martyr-like religious doctrine. The character of St. John Rivers embodies another fundamental Christian view--that man must sacrifice on earth in order to reap his rewards in heaven; this view, Jane also eschews, as she is resolved to find happiness here on earth. She detests Mr. Brocklehurst, and, although she has warm feelings toward Helen as well as St. John, she clearly challenges their

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  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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Villete by Charlotte Bronte.

Katie Dineen English Novel Professor Morse February 25, 2003 Villete by Charlotte Bronte Charlotte Bronte's Villette is the story of Lucy Snowe. After leading a rather tragic life, initially dominated by repression and loneliness, Lucy has taken it upon herself to write her memoirs, and give her personal testament. Standing at the dusk of her life she is able to look back and provide an objective account of herself and those significant in her rather unusual life. Her writings are dominated by the use of natural imagery, which are used by Lucy to portray the personalities, feelings and emotions of her those around her. The imagery, and the relationship with nature it implies, is also an important barometer of Lucy's own reactions to the situations in which she finds herself. As narrator, Lucy Snowe frequently uses animal imagery, to describe other people. The frivolous and vain Ginevra Fanshawe is initially likened to a "hummingbird" and a "butterfly", but as Lucy grows less tolerant towards her, she is presented as a "mealy-winged moth". Polly, perching on the end of her bed, is described as a "white bird", although Lucy also thinks of her as possessing the "supple softness" and "velvet grace" of a kitten. Mme. Beck's furtive ways are compared to those of a "cat", but Lucy will later say that she is as "strict as a dragon". The bestial qualities ascribed to

  • Word count: 668
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Linguistics, Classics and related subjects
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