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How does sexuality a woman's way to be free in the Handmaid's tale? Humans are s****l beings. When we are born, we are affected by a s****l life.

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Introduction

The handmaid's tale How does sexuality a woman's way to be free in the Handmaid's tale? Humans are s****l beings. When we are born, we are affected by a s****l life. According to psychology, since we are born, we start to explore our body. When we are three years old, during our a**l stage of s****l development, we start to discover our body. This is the stage in which we start to feel independent. By being social, the most things we are concerned are related to our s****l life. All our thoughts are occupied in how to use our body to reach something. To take advantage of someone. This makes us fill free. Because we own our body. And we can use it however we want to, whether it is to manipulate someone, or to kill it, in order to show that you own something, and that no regime, no one can make you feel totally possessed, because, at the end you will always own something: your body. Your sexuality. Your freedom. I believe that the author in the Handmaid's tale, places a theory, in which women seem to be totally degraded, but are in fact the main power. ...read more.

Middle

we too can be saved". So Everything that involves reproduction is a ritual. That's why there are too many symbols behind them, the signs outside the shops, the colour of the clothes, the wife's vices, for example, Offred's previous wife used to drink too much alcohol, Serena Joy smokes. There's a strong symbolism of fertility in Serena joy's garden, where "the tulips are opening their cups, spilling out colour", or "here and there are worms, evidence of the fertility of the soil". In the novel, when you are able to give birth you are a handmaid, and have certain power, freedom and distinction over other women. ". Within women, there are stages of status and power. Wives have other kind of power, wives are allowed to smoke, smoke, is a symbol for feminism and empowerment, "really what I wanted was the cigarette". So this gives the wives a certain feeling of supremacy; "she wanted me to feel that I could not come into the house unless she said so". There are the Aunts, who are the ones that teach all the theocratic methods, rules and laws. They have power over the handmaids, who are in a certain point of view the most powerful, because they are there to have the offspring. ...read more.

Conclusion

What we achieve to know are products of small talk, gossip, and what has being heard along the whole households, media and in propaganda. So what we really know is what the narrator knows, which could or could not be true. One theory could be that because it is a well controlled totalitarian regime, one would expect that these small talks are never going to be seized, because they fit into the fear reign, and are allowed. What this means is that maybe this book, and everything that we thought to be free of speech is in fact a foreseen- controlled problem, which fits into the category "freedom", in order to make people feel that can make a difference. I do believe that there is a freedom of speech. That it is her memory, herself the one who makes a difference in a place where there is oppression. That it is her who remembers. Who can choose what to think in moments of adversity. It is she who can decide at the end who is going to be the father of her offspring. And it is her, who is going to choose the course of her life. Because it is she who fights against the system, by just remembering. We can see that Night are the moments in which she distinctively talks about her past, and about her memories. When she used to be free. ...read more.

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