In the depths of despair

In the depths of despair "Gouri! Make us tea, the guests are waiting", dad shouted from the living room as mom was mopping the floor in the kitchen with her injured back. I glanced at the clock that hung over the arched doorway of our kitchen. It was 11:00 o' clock in the morning; the weather was rainy which made my mood gloomy. I couldn't bear to see my mom doing all the work all the time. Not only was she injured but sick as well. While she was taking out the tea pan from the cupboard, I immediately stopped her and brought her to the bedroom to rest. As usual, my dad's friends came over to do their business which was gambling. He gambled away all his life's savings including our farm and our old house. The only thing he had left was his family and very little money, just enough to survive. "Gouri! We are waiting for the damn tea, what's taking you so long?" dad bawled once again. Mom got up and rushed into the kitchen, "Where is Arjun when we need him? You can't serve tea like this showing so much skin in front of all those spiteful gamblers", mom said tensely. I grabbed my mom's hand and took her back to her room, "I've had enough, I'm going to go serve the damn tea and come back, and you get back to resting! You definitely need lots of rest ". I hurried out of the bedroom with the tray and down the front hall, pausing just long enough to check my reflection and

  • Word count: 2466
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Facets of democracy.

One facet of democracy is such that it is the people who determine the leader of a particular state. The United States of America can be regarded as the country that gave rise to this concept as the nation state was born from a war that fought for it. A national electorate chooses the president of the United States. Most Americans learn about the choices they face in national elections not from personal contact with politicians, from public forums, or even from conversations with others, but from the mass media. President Thomas Jefferson emphasized that the public "may safely be trusted to hear everything true and false, and to form a correct judgment between them"1 from the press. The First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech and of the press was established on the basis of this faith.2 The established press fulfilled this purpose and that of fostering citizen understanding and involvement in the political campaign, thus inviting extensive participation in the exclusive form of government termed "democracy."3 It can thus be stated that democracy can result only from the Free press. It is needed to provide vital information that is required to make an intelligent decision in an election campaign. As a result, the media is a necessary instrument in political communication. Communication has evolved as a direct result of technology. There has been an explosion in the

  • Word count: 2981
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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What is a News Journalist?

Chloe Komarzynski Sharon Wade-Ferrell Introduction to Journalism HEJ101 21st March 2005 What is a News Journalist? According to David Conley (vii) 'if the media acts as society's scoreboard, journalists are score-keepers. Some might think that the score is padded or that someone cannot count, but few can deny that journalists are daily historians, recording a community's best and worst moments'. Conley states 'they give a town, city, state, nation - sometimes humanity - a sense of self' (viii). This paper will give a job description of a news journalist, and whether there role differs from other media writers/presenters. The paper will also argue that the role of a news journalist is still important in today's global and multi-media society. The history of journalism will also be examined and how it has changed in the past century, and the new challenges that news journalists face today. According to Conley news can be defined as 'any information of interest to the target audience' (20). Conley explains the needs a news journalist: Being a news journalist means not just willingness but also a compulsion to become educated. It means not just reading newspapers, but rather studying them. It is not just an interest in current affairs, but rather a curiosity that acknowledges everything but boundaries. It helps to have a mind that gallops and eyes that spin 360

  • Word count: 1354
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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What did reconstruction mean to African Americans?

Quentin Sloper Between Slavery and Freedom: African American History, 1865-1945 WHAT DID RECONSTRUCTION MEAN TO AFRICAN AMERICANS? Reconstruction took place in the aftermath of the Civil War which ended in 1865 when the Confederates of the Southern States surrendered to the Union of the North. Its aim was to reorganise the States so that they could become part of the Union. After taking part in the war and having been granted Emancipation by Abraham Lincoln in September 1862, blacks believed that Reconstruction was going to mean a time of sweeping change and increased rights. To some extent this was the case with 'Congressional Reconstruction' resulting in the passing of the first Civil Rights Act (1866), and the ratification of the 14th and 15th Amendments in 1868 and 1870. However, before this period, President Andrew Johnson implemented his 'Presidential Reconstruction' plan. A former slave owner himself, he 'showed little concern over the status of freed people and believed they needed to be controlled by Southern whites'1. Ensuring that the Southern States ratified the 13th Amendment which outlawed slavery, Johnson allowed States to appoint former slave owners and Confederates as delegates to rewrite their constitutions. This resulted in the creation of policies

  • Word count: 2597
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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S.E.A.R.C.Hing has been used in order to uncover social differences between different groups in society. Each letter stands for the different categories in which individuals may be socially advantages and disadvantaged.

Reading Media Texts: Journal Activities Week Two March 7th 2004 S.E.A.R.C.Hing has been used in order to uncover social differences between different groups in society. Each letter stands for the different categories in which individuals may be socially advantages and disadvantaged. S stands for Sex In society men are usually at an advantage to women. Men get all the powerful jobs, which means they earn more money to buy more possessions to show- off their social status. However, in the media, women are becoming a lot more powerful. Decades ago women were in the media purely to promote products such as household items. A popular one was an appliance such as the washing machine or vacuum cleaner. Women were portrayed in the media as housewives either cooking dinner for their husbands or cleaning the house. I got an example for the Internet. It is an advertisement from a woman's magazine in the 1960's. It shows a woman standing in a really messy kitchen smiling and writing something in a notepad. This advertisements conveys the idea that the woman in still happy and cheerful even in her chaotic, messy kitchen. These advertisements were the norm in magazines up until the 1970/80/90's. The portrayal of women in the media reflected the change of status of women in society. Women gained rights such as voting rights and entered the workforce. Main occupation for women however

  • Word count: 1013
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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"Only a critical political economy approach can adequately explain how the media work today

"Only a critical political economy approach can adequately explain how the media work today." Discuss this statement with reference to two of the following: Advertising; news and current affairs; television; radio; newspapers. Despite many views considering the media as the fourth estate and watch dog of society, it is clear, that this is not the case. From the evidence shown in the following essay, it can be strongly concluded that the critical political economy approach is the best and most consistent theory that can adequately explain how the media works toady. This approach not only describes the functioning and role of the media, it also shows us that the media is being more and more influenced by not only a smaller concentration of owners, but also the media's obsession with gaining maximum audiences. The following essay will give an in depth description of not only the critical political economy approach in relation to today's media, but, it will also use the examples of both newspapers and television to emphasis the point that the critical political economy approach to the media is the best and most relevant way in describing the media and its motives in today's society. The critical political economy approach is based around political and economic forces within the media that have a strong influence over its production. It is an idea that attempts to analyse

  • Word count: 2426
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Journalists Play a Vital Social Role

Essay 1: Journalists play a vital social role by providing citizens with information for informed debate. Choose one recent political or social issue and critically evaluate how the journalists performed this role. Journalists present the public with information and comment on issues that would otherwise remain private matters. I will show that Britain has a free press: which allows them to observe and remark on the actions of The Government. I will discuss the challenges of ownership, impartiality versus objectivity and the role of the journalist as watchdog, agenda setter and public informant. I will use examples of political commentary from recent media to assess how journalists perform these roles. Finally, arguing that it is fundamental to the future of the media, that the journalist fights all the constraints imposed and strives to provide society with an unimpeachable source of news. Free Press Britain has a free press, it is run by private corporations, the government has no control over publication, nor is it allowed to own any shares in press companies and no aide is granted. The press is allowed full access to Parliament and Governmental operations are commented on in daily news reports. Britain however, has no written constitution and freedom of the press exists here by consensus only (Belsley & Chadwick, 2006). Frost (2007) argues that it is important,

  • Word count: 1700
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Is it possible to talk of a global public sphere in respect of global news?

MEDS 2003: ADVANCED TELEVISION STUDIES NOREEN RAJPUT ESSAY ASSIGNMENT Is it possible to talk of a global public sphere in respect of global news? This essay evaluates the usefulness and validity of the concept of a global public sphere in relation to the media, in particular the news. The concept of the public sphere is best known in its formulation by the German critical theorist Jurgen Habermas in the early 1960's. This essay will first demonstrate a brief theoretical discussion of the concepts of globalisation and the public sphere. Secondly, in order to determine whether or not there is a global public sphere in respect of the news, I will discuss the idea that the news is a complex and bias process and that its content is heavily based on the news values of professional organisations. I will also argue that the news is a commodity and a form of entertainment. Thirdly, my essay will address some of the evidence which implies that there is a globalizing tendency in the news and finally, I consider whether the evidence is adequate to support the notion that 'a global public sphere in the respect of global news' actually exists. In order to discuss the possibility of a global public sphere in terms of global news, it is first important to define the key terms themselves. According to Sparks 'There is no one set of ideas that we can point to as

  • Word count: 3429
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Critical Discourse Analysis

Critical Discourse Analysis Social communication is increasingly becoming a subject of scientists' discussions from different disciplines, as well as ordinary language users. In contemporary social sciences, especially in linguistics, we see a clear shift to discourse. Discourse allows us to talk about use of the language, as well as the language as a socio-cultural activity. In this sense, discourse, on one hand, reflects the social reality, on the other hand, it shapes it, therefore participate in the creation and pass on different values, ideologies and symbolic power. This essay aims to show the definition of Critical Discourse Analysis and also show how useful it is for exploring issues of power and inequality in relation to gender. Since its introduction to modern science the term 'discourse' has taken various, sometimes very broad, meanings. Originally the word 'discourse' comes from Latin 'discursus' which means conversation, speech. Discourse refers to a wide area of human life. Being aware of differences between kinds of discourses indicates the unity of communicative intentions as a vital element of each of them. Seven criteria which have to be fulfilled to qualify either a written or a spoken text as a discourse have been suggested by Beaugrande (1981). These include: Cohesion - grammatical relationship between parts of a sentence essential for its

  • Word count: 1509
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Attacks on Private Hire Taxi Drivers in Oldham- Are they Racist?

Attacks on Private Hire Taxi Drivers in Oldham- Are they Racist? 'For three days in May 2001 the eyes of the nation, and a sizable part of the world, were on Oldham. The town whose main claim to fame was that it was once the cotton spinning capital of the world was thrust into the limelight for the less worthy reason that it was the scene of the worst racially motivated riots in fifteen years'. (Ritchie, 2001) Since the riots of May 2001 there has been an increased occurrence of violent attacks on taxi drivers being reported in both local and national media, these attacks culminated in January 2003 in the murder of Izra Hussain, an Asian private hire taxi driver and father of six. The aim of this report is to try to find out whether these attacks are racially motivated. In the Dictionary of race and Ethnic Relations (1984) E. E. Cashmore defines prejudice as 'learned beliefs and values that lead an individual or group of individuals to be biased for or against member of particular groups'. Prejudice is therefore about what people think and is not necessarily translated into actions. Discrimination, on the other hand, is about actions. Cashmore defines it as 'the unfavourable treatment of all persons socially assigned to a particular category'. Both prejudice and discrimination are often based on stereotypes about particular groups of people. In order to research these

  • Word count: 1734
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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