What are the limits to balance and objectivity in contemporary British Journalism

What are the limits to balance and objectivity in contemporary British Journalism? Illustrate your answer with reference to news coverage of particular events This essay aims to form an accurate picture of Balance and Objectivity in British journalism and to analyse the underlining implications. These will be discussed with regard to the coverage of news both old and current. The real debate is that, no matter how much the press tries to give balanced reporting and news coverage, somewhere during the process bias will prevail, either in selection, distortion, manipulation or editing prior to publication. Ultimately, news which we are presented with is neither objective nor balanced: balance and objectivity are not only impossible but also there are situations in which the press chooses not to be objective. This contention is supported by Theodore L. Glasser, who argues that bias is essential; objectivity removes responsibility from journalism, and does not serve the needs of society (Glasser: 1992: p182). There are other ways in which news coverage can be biased and under subjective scrutiny. Let us consider John Simpson, BBC's war correspondent. His reporting suggests and underlines ideological values that impede objectivity either unwilling or unwittingly. His general claims are that, as a reporter he reports everything he sees happening in a war. In the case of the

  • Word count: 2157
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Marketing Bling H20

Bling H20 Do you Bling? Bottled water is convenient and healthier than high-sugar soft drinks. It is readily available, comes in a trendy bottle and it's all yours. Hollywood writer/producer Kevin G Boyd has developed a "luxury" bottled water called Bling H20 that costs an average of $55. The bottles are available in limited edition frosted gasses and covered with Swarovski crystals. The following will highlight the typical customer for Bling, facts on Australian's bottled water industry and a few ethical issues concerning bling. Geographic A geographic segmentation is identifying and analysing the location that a company is looking to move into. (Adam K & Armstrong D, 2008) The premium status and pricing, that bling put on their product would narrow the geographic segment to the economic centres of Australia, these being Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. Furthermore, these areas can be additionally segmented; suburbs where there with high -profile and social standing people; the most anticipated customers of bling. For example, Northern Beaches. Demographic The demographic make-up of a potential market is made up of the age group, income, occupation, gender, race, education and religion. (Adam K & Armstrong D, 2008) After reviewing the media on bling and the website the demographic profile for bling would be 20 - 35 year old female with a high level of disposable

  • Word count: 1400
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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'Fireworks and a number twenty-two' - Commentary.

Commentary The stimulus for the creation of 'Fireworks and a number twenty-two' derived from columns and articles found in many women's magazines today. These features tell of various events the writers have experienced and convey the accounts in a very 'earthy', 'honest' and 'raw' way. This allows the reader to connect with the writer through a commonality of an experience, which draws the audience more into the article. The model text that inspired my article was the column, turned book, turned major blockbuster movie 'Bridget Jones' Diary'. 'Fireworks and a number thirty-two' is a magazine column written to entertain a female audience, suitable to feature in magazines such as 'Red', 'Cosmopolitan' and 'Company'. These magazines attract a female audience, aged between twenty and thirty-five, who take an interest in fashion, beauty and modern lifestyles. In addition, females are commonly known for their fascination with gossip, and magazines such as 'Company' provide an abundance of scandal and gossip stories for women to feast on. Magazines such as those mentioned frequently offer a commonality of experience for their audience; problem pages and real-life stories all provide an insight into the life of a 'conventional' workingwoman. This is a method I decided to adopt in order for my audience to relate to my character by exploring the commonality of experiences, which

  • Word count: 955
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Journalism and Public Life

M Junaid Khan 201 501 570 Journalism and Public Life Week 7- Community Newspapers Tutor- Kamini With regards to Letters to the Editor, Warl- Jorgenson (2002) believes that they "are not representative of the general population". She believes that the letters printed and often written only represent a segment of the general population. In this way, the interests of the general population are not catered for. Letters that are misrepresentative allow media companies to cater for only the needs of a few while neglecting the greater public. The author then argues that the operation of the newspaper " is orientated away from the service of the public and from taking seriously its concerns and ideas" Warl- Jorgenson (2002:186). She then states that contemporary newsroom practises function in a top-down way. I believe that this is like the military, where feedback is minimal. Top-down journalism would imply that journalists have a sense of power and that the audience are just passive beings, with no sense of rationality. The author's main point is that editors should take the audience more seriously. This is not necessarily the case in my community, as I shall explore later. Habermas (1994) talks about a public sphere in which the people would talk about issues and the press would cover these issues. Now it seems that the press is selective in nature and it provides the topics

  • Word count: 1013
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Media Criticism Assignment: Sexism in Advertisements

Communication 260 Media Criticism Assignment: Sexism in Advertisements In the world of advertising, the phrase: "SEX, sells" has been used repeatedly. It seems as if the oppression of women in ad campaigns is what helps generate attention and profit for products. Not only do such ever-present images encourage and reinforce our society to equate sex as a commodity, but they strengthen stereotypes of women as sex objects and have the capability to promote violence against women. Sexism in advertisements has become one of the key ingredients to producing and running a successful ad campaign. Everywhere we turn, advertisements are continuously telling us what it would take for us to be deemed desirable as men and women. For a man, in order to be desirable, one must be successful, rich and powerful. However, in order to be successful as a woman, all subliminal messages share a common theme: Beauty is what is needed in order to be successful. As a woman, I know first-hand how it feels to be continually judged and compared to the various examples of beauty and perfection that is supplied by the advertisement industry. Women are criticized and judged on their bodies and how they look every day; advertisements have a tendency to suggest that women should change their appearance to fit a stereotypical ideal of beauty. I believe that it is extremely important that women of

  • Word count: 1769
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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The printing press had a great influence on the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century and without the use of this technology Martin Luther would not have been nearly as successful in his challenging of the Catholic Church.

The printing press had a great influence on the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century and without the use of this technology Martin Luther would not have been nearly as successful in his challenging of the Catholic Church. The printing press in the early 1500s paved the way for Luther and the Reformation and assisted him in more ways than just the publication of his works. The printing press was used for the publication of propaganda against Rome and also provided the publication of notices alerting the people to debates and rallies held by the Augustinian monk. There are other factors that assisted the influence of the printing press in this movement including the large increase in literacy levels and the support that Luther received from his followers. The printing press played an imperative role in the Protestant Reformation, as it was used as a media that produced thousands of Luther's works which were in turn distributed throughout Germany and stretching as far as Lyons and Meaux.1 Dickens states that without the involvement of the printing press, the Reformation, or any revolution of this extent, could not be achieved.2 The printing press has often gone unnoticed or given less credit than it deserves in its role in the Reformation. Eisenstein said of the publishers in Strasbourg, "[they] did much more than mirror the Reform; they prepared its way, they

  • Word count: 1162
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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The era of press barons and its harmful effects on British's domestic politics.

THE ERA OF PRESS BARONS AND ITS HARMFUL EFFECTS ON BRITISH'S DOMESTIC POLITICS In a British film, "James Bond: Tomorrow Never Dies", the villain, Elliot Carver, a press baron wanting to take over the world, declared that "Words are the new weapons... Caesar had his legions, Napoleon had armies, and I have my division, TV, news, magazines." The statement, though made in a fictitious setting, has its roots in reality. In recent decades, the competitive nature of the press industry had seen unprofitable press firms being forced out of business, and an oligopolistic situation emerged with three leading press groups accounting for 75% of newspaper readership in Britain.1 This had led to the narrowing of viewpoints presented in the papers and press barons, hungry for profits, pushed the concern for democratic pluralism off their agenda.2 Pluralists see the press, by disseminating information and safeguarding the rights to speech, as enhancing democracy and acting as checks and balances against state abuses, as they occupy the fourth estate that is free from the Crown, Parliament and the Judiciary. 3 However, such a view is highly idealistic when economics is the main consideration of the press barons in reality. George Boyce, a revisionist, even commented that the British press with "its head in politics and its feet in commerce" had turned the fourth estate into a sheer

  • Word count: 2168
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Gender & Sex: Cultural Studies

Essay title: Explain why Cultural Studies is interested in the difference between 'sex' and 'gender' The differences between 'sex' and 'gender' and the issues that surround them are found at the heart of most of the key features of Cultural Studies - representation, identity & subjectivity, ideology, power and social construction to name a few. The sex/gender distinction is widely used among cultural theorists and post-feminists as it is considered a useful analytical tool for studying the differences and / or similarities between men and woman when looking at such key features, with Evans suggesting that 'the thesis that gender politics were absolutely central to the very project of representation' (Evans, 1997:72: / Cultural Studies Theory and Practice: Barker,C. 2006, p.307). Initially the differences between gender and sex lie in the academic interpretation of their meanings - Barker suggests that 'sex' refers to the 'biology of the body' the physical markers that distinguish male from female, while 'gender' concerns 'the cultural assumptions and practices which govern the social construction of men, women and their social relations.' (Barker, C. 2006, p.440). He goes on to say that 'Gender is a matter of how men and women are represented and performed' this would suggest that gendered differences - those that society associates with being masculine and feminine - have no

  • Word count: 1434
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Racism In the Media.

RACISM IN THE MEDIA Introduction Mainstream media across the world have been accused of 'virtually whitewashing' the airwaves. Many ethnic minority groups claim to experience hostility, marginalisation and discrimination regularly from many media institutions. There is an endless struggle for minorities to gain professional access to the media, as the monochromatic view of black people as scrounging immigrants, dysfunctional families, drug-dealing thugs and pimps fails to go away. Factors such as state-ownership, Trans-National Corporations and major advertisers have transformed the creative sphere of the media into a capitalistic, profit-obsessed empire, and view the role of the ethnic minority as a hindrance to ratings and the status quo themselves. Commercialism and capitalistic structures are taking over the media's promise to be creative and democratic. Racism in the media is not a process of name-calling or stone throwing, but it is a noticeable lack of ethnic minorities participating in the media and the way in which they are excluded from structures of the media. Many English speaking communities maintain their cultural control through mainstream media with a peculiar form of professional standards called 'our style our standard'. These keep out well qualified first generation ethnic migrant journalists and broadcasters from mainstream media. British and American

  • Word count: 4562
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Report on Social Issues

Report on Social and Ethical Issues I have based my report on IT and Children. I will look at points that both help and hinder children and there use of IT. The first part of IT I will look into is the Internet and how it is a disadvantage to children. Most children now have either got there own computer at home or have access to another computer. They can use these computers to access the internet. The internet is dangerous even to an adult but it is ten times as dangerous for children. They have access to such sites as 'bebo' and 'facebook' which are social networking sites that any one can join. On these sites children can add personal information and photographs. This means that a sex offender could have access to children's photos. These photos can be copied and saved to a computer very easy, so anybody could visit a child's page only once but could have there information for life. This could also be done through chat rooms, children may think they are chatting to another child but really it could be a sex offender, passing of as a child. Another way the internet is harmful for children is through the sites they visit, e.g. young teenage boys could access porn sites easily by using search engines such as Google. These sites then could add pop us to computers which will harm the computers CPU. Children could also visit sites that allow them to download for free. From a

  • Word count: 1561
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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