To what extent does the print-media influence young people into smoking, in relation to the recent restrictions on tobacco advertising?

To what extent does the print-media influence young people into smoking, in relation to the recent restrictions on tobacco advertising? Introduction Media messages in our modern society are endemic. They are projected through television, film and radio, by way of advertising, via newspapers and magazines, on the internet and through books, brochures and posters. It is near impossible to escape the constant messages fired from the media, and the extent of its influence upon society has been frequently questioned throughout the years. Despite the deteriorating reputation of smoking, images of it can be witnessed daily through the media, particularly within celebrity magazines. In February 2003, a law was passed banning tobacco companies from advertising their products on billboards, in the print media and even through sport sponsorship. Regardless of their questionable effectiveness, these laws do not forbid images of smoking being printed in newspapers and magazines. Some celebrity magazines may illustrate famous people as 'common' when they are photographed with a cigarette; however the picture is still sold to the masses. This may have a detrimental effect on society, particularly to young people, who may be susceptible to influences from the media. This dissertation aims to provide a study of the literature connected with media influences on tobacco and attempts to

  • Word count: 9107
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Textual Assignment

Assignment - Textual Assignment This text is written using quite colloquial language in order to create a good rapport with the reader and audience, it does not contain any subject specific jargon or technical language as this piece is written for a quite wide ranging audience. The text, taken from a tabloid newspaper article is laid out into 3 columns. These 3 columns are broken up using three sub-headings which include 'Passionate', 'Story' and 'Angry'. This text is not written is any chronological order as events from different times are used, then re-used in the different sections. The article is written using three points of view and is broken up accordingly, the first section is written from the writers point of view, this section runs from the beginning of the article up until the end of the seventh paragraph. The second section is written from one of the characters point of view known in the article as 'Sally' and runs from the eighth paragraph all of the second column and up to the second sub-heading 'Story'. The third and final section is written from another characters point of view, this being the character of Mr Stevenson, this section runs through until the end of the article. In the first section, the introduction, the main points of the article are all summarized to give the reader an understanding about what the article is about and whether it interests

  • Word count: 814
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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media planner

Evaluate the contribution of advertising to brand development This essay will attempt to evaluate the contribution that advertising has on brand development. It will firstly do this by explaining what a brand is, and how the development of a brand starts with the different process of advertising. It will highlight the different forms of advertising mechanisms such as promotion, public relations and direct marketing, companies use to communicate the value of the brand by using different forms of advertising to reinforce brand associations for their consumers everyday needs and export a certain lifestyle. I will also consider how in order to understand the context and the roles of brands it is also important to clarify consumers buying behaviour with the rise of new technology with the, emergence of new media and interactive technology like video TV available on mobile phones, sms txt message, the world wide web has given rise to the efforts to individualised communication According to Williams a brand is " A brand is a combination of names, slogans, logos, product design, packaging, advertising and marketing that together give particular products or services a physical, recognisable form. But this is not all. Brands also have a cerebral dimension, which is the reputation they enjoy in the minds of the consumers. Brands must engender trust and loyalty if they are

  • Word count: 1309
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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'Semiotic analysis of an image of your choice'

Media studies MED 103 Introduction to Media Theory Assessment 1: 'Semiotic analysis of an image of your choice' Introduction: The aim of the essay is to undertake a semiotic analysis of an image, in this case a magazine advertisement, and to comment on the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. Using analysis of: * Denotation vs. Connation, * Signifier vs. Signified, * Codes, * Signs, * Representation of reality. The image will be dissected into its individual building blocks in order to assess its effectiveness as an advert and its commentary on society today, also discussing whether semiotic analysis is the truest discipline to follow in this case. Denotation vs. Connation, Signifier vs. Signified: The image I have chosen is a magazine advertisement for 'Heinz Big Soup'. In order to analysis the semiotics of this image I will firstly discuss what is visibly present in the image (known as the signifier) and what the suggested meanings are (what is signified). The main focus of the image is a large, seemingly well made cooking pot with a violently broken handle, in the lower right hand corner there is a picture of a can of 'Heinz Big soup'. The pot is positioned on a warm beige background and there is no text. What is denoted in the image is a pot with a broken handle and a can of soup, however there are underlying conations as to what the suggested meaning

  • Word count: 1505
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Some nouns are more noun-like than others. Discuss.

Some nouns are more noun-like than others. Discuss. Unfortunately, often in grammar it is difficult to definitely place one lexical item into one class and not another. Words frequently share similar properties from one or more word class; a word may behave in a grammatically similar way to others from its class but may then share none of their other qualities. This then presents a problem for grammarians: to which class do they assign the word? Through this essay I intend to show that not all nouns fit neatly into the typical definition of a noun. By providing the defining qualities of a noun I aim to argue against them that some nouns are more noun-like than others. I will look at nouns in the areas of number, proper nouns and count and non count nouns. Firstly, I will further define the notion of gradience. Quirk et al (1985:73,90) explains a gradient as a scale that relates two categories through degrees of difference and similarity. At the each end of the scale are the lexical items that are the most prototypical members of their word class. The spaces in between on the scale are filled by items that do not fulfil all the requirements to be considered a prototypical example of the set. Gradience is important when discussing whether certain nouns are more noun-like than others because there needs to be a sliding scale of change from the words that are the most noun-like

  • Word count: 2251
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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TO WHAT EXTENT DO YOU AGREE, OR DISAGREE WITH THE ASSERTION BY GUARDIAN JOURNALIST NICK DAVIES, IN HIS BOOK FLAT EARTH, THAT THE BRITISH JOURNALIST HAVE BECOME CHURNALIST?

JOURNALISM THEMES AND ISSUES M29CMC COURSE WORK 2 TOPIC TO WHAT EXTENT DO YOU AGREE, OR DISAGREE WITH THE ASSERTION BY GUARDIAN JOURNALIST NICK DAVIES, IN HIS BOOK FLAT EARTH, THAT THE BRITISH JOURNALIST HAVE BECOME "CHURNALIST"? BY ARAMIDE KING TUTOR FRED MUDHAI DATE 24/04/08 Nick Davies' Flat Earth News and 'Churnalism' in British Journalism: a personal response "For journalists, the defining value is honesty - the attempt to tell the truth. That is our primary purpose." Nick Davies, author of Flat Earth News An award-winning reporter Nick Davies, together with his team at the journalism department in Cardiff University, come up with a highly controversial book on global journalism and media using comprehensive analyses of around 2,000 articles from various publications - local and international including the prestigious ones in the British media industry. With his 31 years of exposure to the journalism profession, his book is an alarming expose of how journalists write news. Davies claims that his book is not to criticise individual journalists but the structures that govern and constrain them. In his book, Davies asserts that British journalists has become 'churnalists' and involved on what he called 'churnalism'. This paper discusses the extent of agreement on Davies' assertion. Davies' assertion is an agreeable concept as it assesses the current condition

  • Word count: 2764
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Sapphic Slashers

Sapphic Slashers In "Sapphic Slashers," Lisa Duggan masterfully examines two very distinct, yet both highly influential narratives that modernized the American values of race, class, gender, and sexuality well into the 20th century. Prior to her analysis of both the lynching and lesbian identity narratives, Duggan stresses that her intention is not to find direct connections between them. "The goal of the study is not to persuasively demonstrate an empirical link between lynching and lesbian love murder. The lesbian love murder story and the lynching narrative were not simply analogous or parallel tales of sexual pathology leading to political disfranchisement; they thematized different antagonisms and motivated different forms of social action that cannot be represented as equivalent."1 Though it is evident both narratives do not contextually share many similarities, it is clear that black men and white women did share many similarities in terms of the circumstances endured, the obstacles overcome, the unjust outcomes, and more importantly the yearning for political, economic, social, and sexual freedoms- freedoms that were out of their grasp from the force that had grappled them for an entire century, the white male patriarch cal society. Despite the successes following the Civil War and the emergence of many vocal political and civil rights leaders, the efforts of these

  • Word count: 2455
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Discuss Objectivity and impartiality in war and conflict reporting today in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Discuss Objectivity and impartiality in war and conflict reporting today in Iraq and Afghanistan. The media coverage of war in Iraq and Afghanistan today, is one of constant conflict. Many organisations believe that war coverage should be Objective and Impartial, with no preference to either 'side'. The terms 'objectivity' and 'impartiality' within journalism are perceived as, "the adoption of a position of detachment" from the subject of media coverage. The terms suggest one should refrain from involving subjective, personalised involvement and judgements. However, as this essay will discuss, is it possible for objectivity to be upheld in the face of war? That objectivity could in fact just be "a mirage". Or will the lack of Objectivity ultimately present dangers to the public and the media? Media audiences of today are heavily influenced and opinionated by news content, which invoked the institutional ideal of 'Objectivity'. Networks decisions to exclude or include items from their news bulletins has aroused heated and often hot-blooded discussions in the media and public sphere. The Aftermath of September 11th and the beginning of the Iraq war particularly caused a renewal of this debate, involving Al-Jazeera and Fox News. Al - Jazeera and Fox news are two media corporations that are heavily accused of lacking in objectivity within their reports of the Iraq war.

  • Word count: 2043
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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What Was the Contribution of the ‘Press Barons’ To the Popular Press?

WHAT WAS THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE 'PRESS BARONS' TO THE POPULAR PRESS? The modern daily press has emerged over a period of around 300 years, from the early 1600's to the early 1900's. During this period, increase in literacy levels, higher standards of living and increased purchasing power lead to the increase of publication and purchase of newspapers. The quality and facilitation of newspapers had greatly improved due to the development of printing technology, roads and railways. Telegraphs, telephones and typewriters enabled better methods of news gathering and contributed to the growth of the popular press. Lord Northcliffe, Lord Rothermere ,The Berry brothers and Lord Beaverbrook, popularly known as the 'press barons' contributed to the development of the popular press and each in their own way, has made an everlasting impression on the British press industry. Lord Northcliffe, originally known as Alfred Harmsworth was one of the most successful newspaper publishers in the history of the British press, and was a founder of popular modern journalism. In 1888, inspired by the success of Tit-Bits, a popular weekly of informative scraps, he decided to start a similar paper of his own called 'Answers to Correspondents'. He was financially supported by his brother Harold Harmsworth, and after the success of 'Answers to Correspondents' they started publishing several other

  • Word count: 1976
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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ANALYSE THE ARGUMENTS FOR AND AGAINST TIGHTER CONTROL OF THE BRITISH PRESS

Media Studies ANALYSE THE ARGUMENTS FOR AND AGAINST TIGHTER CONTROL OF THE BRITISH PRESS When looking at the issue of whether or not the control of the British press should be tightened or not, there are many different arguments, both for and against. In this essay, I will discuss issues for both sides of the argument and make a personal conclusion at the end. Some people believe that giving the press tighter control will restrict offences caused to individual people. If the press were to make up a story that was not 100% true, and print it in a paper, certain individuals may be upset and the paper/editor could get in trouble and accused of libel. Libel is a published false statement damaging to a person's reputation: a false and defamatory written statement. An example of a case where a certain individual got offended was when it was published that Elton John had been sexually intimate with an underage boy. These claims turned out to be untrue and Elton John sued the newspaper that printed this. This leads to the next argument, newspapers may write untrue statements and get away with it, thus leading to the public believing (technically) "lies". This could be potentially dangerous as altering public opinions can lead to 'Moral Panics'. A Moral Panic is a widespread public concern, usually fuelled by sensational media coverage, that an event or group is threatening

  • Word count: 1109
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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