Using examples, consider how useful semiotics is as an approach to the analysis of the media

Using examples, consider how useful semiotics is as an approach to the analysis of the media Media organizations must communicate information successfully in order for them to be a first choice by the public. And it can be concluded that communication process is vital for people to understand phenomenon and organise themselves mentally. An effective analysis of media sources requires a person to look at the overall frame in order to comprehensively understand the idea that is presented. The details in a picture gives away the hints which make the object amusing to solve because there are reasons for every details in the picture which people tend to carry on as it motivates and interests them. Semiotics is regarded as a successful technique for the analysis of media sources. Oxford Dictionary defines Semiotics as "the study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation". A very well known semiotic called Roland Barthes provided better definition of semiotics by giving realistic examples: 'semiology aims to take in any system of signs, whatever their substance and limits; images, gestures, musical sounds, objects, and the complex associations of all of these, which form the content of ritual, convention or public entertainment: these constitute, if not languages, at least systems of signification'. (Barthes 1967, 9) However a Swiss linguist called to Ferdinand de

  • Word count: 2348
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Semiotic Analysis of Advertisements

Semiotic Analysis of Advertisements "Women magazines communicate their mythic meaning by means of signs, thus their representations of the imagery are dependant on the symbolic, the signs which do the communicating" (Bignell 1997). Bignell argues that a magazine is "just a collection of signs" The title of the magazine, the colours, the layout, the language and so on are all examples of these signs and each have been selected specifically to generate a meaning. Therefore a magazine can be said to be a complex collection of signs that can be broadly decoded and analysed by its readers. According to Saussure, signs consist of two elements, a signifier and a signified and only gain meaning when "it has someone to mean to" (Williamson 1978). As a result, the reader is very important as they will bring their own interpretations to text by using their own cultural values and perceptual codes. In this essay I hope to take a semiotic approach in analysis of the front cover of a magazine (called 19) to demonstrate how meaning can be created in an audience and how the media constructs the image and behavioural ideology. First, the title immediately announces that the magazine is among the genres of teenage magazines. The 19 seems to represent that the magazine is aimed at 19 year olds or at least teenagers within that age range who may think they are as mature as a 19 year old. As the

  • Word count: 1678
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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What are the strengths and weaknesses of the five main advertising media? Explain why Internet advertising differs from the other advertising media.

University of East London CC1701 An Introduction to Advertising Industry SEMESTER A 2010-2011 Course Work 1: What are the strengths and weaknesses of the five main advertising media? Explain why Internet advertising differs from the other advertising media. Student No. 0938193 Word Count: 1545 There are the four major groups involved in the advertising industry, advertisers which also known as clients, advertising agencies, suppliers and media. Moreover, in the modern world, there are five main advertising media, print, television, radio, cinema and outdoor. Internet advertising or online advertising is another important advertising media which existed at the end of 20th century; it is differ from the other five main advertising media by its specificity. Therefore, this essay is going to discuss the positive points and negative points of the five main advertising media in the first part, and explain the special case of internet advertising in the second part. Firstly, this essay is going to analyse the strengths and weaknesses of the five main advertising media of print, television, radio, cinema and outdoor respectively. MacRury argued that print or press can be considered as the first advertising medium in the modern world. (2009, p: 91) Newspapers and magazines can be regarded as the most common two advertising media of print. There are two types of the advertising

  • Word count: 1677
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Analysis of Nelson Mandela's Inauguration Speech

Analysis of Nelson Mandela's Inauguration Speech Communications 361 Nelson Mandela's inauguration speech held major significance in many ways due mainly to the fact that before becoming the first black president of South Africa, he had spent decades fighting against apartheid and enduring 22 years of prison. This speech was presented in order to signify a new era and a new page in the history of South Africa. Every word and sentence was carefully chosen in order to serve a specific purpose and address different audiences both within South Africa and to the world. The purpose of Mandela's speech was not simply to address the nation as their new president and give gratitude to those who put him there but instead to make a statement that South Africa was going to make immense changes and unify to show the world what the nation could truly do in order to become a land of hope, freedom, justice and equality for all. Throughout the speech, Mandela very carefully and specifically uses both ethos and pathos in order to draw out many different emotions and encourage the nation to feel unified and prepared to make the necessary changes to overcome and rectify the deeply rooted problems which South Africans faced for all too long. Mandela, being a well-known figure in South Africa long before becoming president, had a strong established credibility within the black community.

  • Word count: 1397
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Strategic Assessment - Wealth Creator Magazine (WCM)

Strategic Assessment - Wealth Creator Magazine (WCM) Company Profile: An Australian business investment magazine that publishes article pertaining to financial success and investment strategies. Corporate Purpose: To increase magazine circulation and achieve rapid growth in a declining magazine category. Business Model: WCM's distinctive competencies lie within its team of personnel who are all extremely motivated individuals like the magazine target market; and are dedicated to the success of the magazine. The company focuses on having experienced column staff who are not journalists, but successful business men and women. It has a competitive advantage over other publications in that it is published bimonthly and therefore ensuring the content quality. In addition, it is supported by other Wealth Creator products such as Wealth Net, the largest wealth and business club in Australia, and Wealth Creator Radio.1 The magazine generates value to customers by empowering readers with the skills, tools and motivation to become wealthy. They achieve this by providing informative articles that identify key strategies of successful entrepreneurs and business people. This has boosted circulation to over 100,000 since its first issue in September 2002 generating a cash surplus for the owners.2 Competitor Profile: WCM has many competitors in the business investment magazine category

  • Word count: 1028
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Show how concepts of nationhood might be applied to textual analysis

SHOW HOW CONCEPTS OF NATIONHOOD MIGHT BE APPLIED TO TEXTUAL ANALYSIS 'All meanings depend on the key of interpretation'1, so claims Mordecai in George Eliot's Daniel Deronda. Difficulty arises when one question who the holder of the key is; the writer who embodies meaning and ideology into their work, or the reader assimilating the text. The writer is inextricably bound by their personal and social understanding, culture and nationhood, equally is the reader. Every reading is interpreted differently and individually, thus causing confusion of meaning. The writer uses words that fulfil his own ideas and depict to him the images to be conveyed. A writer can construct a text in any number of ways, choosing from the common stock of words those which seem to express the message best. But the reader receiving this text is not confined to any one interpretation. Although restricted by language rules, readings are not strictly dictated by the script itself or therefore by the author. Reading...is a bewildering, labyrinthine, common and yet personal process of reconstruction.2 The concept of nationhood develops from beliefs in human diversity and similarity. That by being born of certain parentage, of certain nation and infinite other variations one automatically becomes definable by these characteristics. Gillian Beer suggests that Darwin's theories of selection explain the

  • Word count: 1822
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Reality TV and Culture Industires

'Criticism and respect disappear in the culture industry; the former becomes a mechanical expertise, the latter is succeeded by a shallow cult of personalities' (Adorno and Horkheimer, The Culture Industries). To what extent does the rise of reality TV support Adorno and Horkheimer's statement? Within this essay I will explore the genre of Reality TV by drawing upon Adorno & Horkheimer's theory on the 'culture industry'. Firstly, I will begin by defining Reality TV, looking at its historical, cultural and social significance alongside the controversies surrounding the genre. Secondly I will investigate Adorno and Horkheimer's statement by looking at the morality and standardization that exist within Reality TV, highlighting the 'attributed' celebrity ('celetoid'), voyeurism and general erosion of public and private spheres. Over the last decade, we have witnessed a dramatic shift in the popularity of television shows. Primetime TV was generally reserved for soap operas, series dramas and comedy shows. However, the digital revolution gave room for channels to be more flexible in their screening, with more channels offering different possibilities for the direction of popular culture. This led to the general rise of Reality TV and the desertion of blatant escapism in dramas and soap operas to a less carefully constructed form of escapism through judgment and interactivity.

  • Word count: 2289
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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What were the consequences of Watergate for the US press?

What were the consequences of Watergate for the US press? In 1972 and 1973, led by investigative reporters from the Washington Post, the press exposed links between the administration of President Nixon and a burglary of the Democratic Party national headquarters. This became known as the Watergate Scandal. Senate hearings on the scandal and preparations of the House of Representatives for impeachment were carried by live television and attracted huge audiences. President Nixon resigned soon thereafter. Previous to this scandal erupting, the elite East Coast press, exemplified by the New York Times and the Washington Post, were the specific targets of President Nixon's scorn, calling them "pointy headed liberals", and "the nattering nabobs of negativism". The press had their revenge, however, and Nixon was forced out by the investigations of two reporters from the Washington Post, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward. They managed to reveal Nixon's part in covering up the Watergate break in as well as a list of other crimes. This event remains one of the greatest moments in the history of American journalism, and has had a deep impact on the role and perception of the American press. The long-term consequences of Watergate are agreed to be profound. Watergate undeniably boosted journalism to be a far more high profile profession than was previously thought, and proved

  • Word count: 1324
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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"Avoid metaphor and metonymy if you want to write clearly and effectively" Discuss, using examples from recent texts to illustrate your answer.

Written Discourse Analysis, ELF 601 Assessed Assignment 3: "Avoid metaphor and metonymy if you want to write clearly and effectively." Discuss, using examples from recent texts to illustrate your answer. Word count: 2032 The use of metaphor, either verbally, or in written discourse, to describe scenes & explain events in the world around us is very common, its use enables us to understand & experience one type of thing within the conditions & terms of another, whereas metonymy is the use of one entity to refer to another that is related to it, & includes 'synecdoche' where the part stands for the whole, Lakoff & Johnson, (1980:36). According to Lakoff & Johnson, (1980: ix) metaphor is ever-present, in language, as well as thought & action. They, along with Pinker, (1997: 352 et seq) perceive human thought processes to be metaphorical in nature; Pinker also suggests that some metaphorical concepts have grown to be so common, across the whole range of speech acts & other events that we experience, that they are no longer recognisable to the layman as metaphorical expressions, so entrenched within our everyday language use have they become. According to this insight into metaphor, it can be seen as one of the principal methods by which language evolves, Jaynes, (1990), moreover, repetition of a metaphor can bring it into ordinary language, eventually warranting a

  • Word count: 2038
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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To what extent do the texts Heart of Darkness, Black Mischief and A Passage to India represent examples of colonial discourse?

Title: To what extent do the texts Heart of Darkness, Black Mischief and A Passage to India represent examples of colonial discourse? In beginning this essay it would be helpful to define what is meant by colonial discourse. This term refers to the dominant ideology within British society during the time of the empire and thus can be defined as discourse which supports the action of colonisation. The colonial ideal, (the term for colonial discourse in its undiluted form), suggests that both the coloniser and the colonised benefit from the action of colonisation. The colonies benefit in that they are becoming more developed and civilised through the adoption of western practices and technologies and the coloniser benefits from, as Hobson put it "The export of surplus capital".1 Thornton cited in J. Meyer's Fiction and the Colonial Experience explains how this was the prevailing ideology within the British government until well after the unit texts I will be focussing upon were written: - The Imperial principle, animating an imperial code, remained the dynamic in the thought and action of the governing classes of England until after the close of the twentieth century's second world war.2 This essay will attempt to explore and suggest ways in which three chosen texts, (all British novels written during the period of the British Empire), both support or oppose this discourse.

  • Word count: 2925
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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