Chocolate vs Vanilla

Why Chocolate is Better than Vanilla Introduction: Attention Getting Opening: It's a war that has been fought for centuries. On one side, the ancient Mayans, who come out strong with a bitter drink called xocolatl, along with their offensive partner Milton Hershey, the first American to mass-produce the milk chocolate bar (joyofbaking), (Hershey's). The others won't go down without a fight; at the Wendy's drive through, a new question is being asked after every Frosty order: chocolate or vanilla? Reason your audience would be interested in this speech: It is a fun topic, and these flavors are present in everyone's lives at any age. Establish your credibility: I have done tireless research over the Internet, as well as sampled many vanilla and chocolate flavored items. Thesis Statement: Chocolate is a better flavoring than vanilla, because: * It is better for your health * Will make you happier and more energetic * Is more economical Transition: Chocolate gives many health benefits, which are not found in vanilla. Body: Main Point A.: Chocolate is delicious and good for your health. * Antioxidants found in dark chocolate can help your heart by lowering blood pressure and preventing heart disease and diabetes. Contrary to popular belief, saturated fats found in chocolate have no adverse effect on cholesterol levels. (Ingall, Marjorie, cnn) * Chocolate

  • Word count: 934
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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"Do We Want To Follow New York& Be Smoke- Free"?

Text Analysis; Evening Standard (London), October 27, 2003 "Do We Want To Follow New York & Be Smoke- Free" (Ross Lydall; Alexis Akwagyiram) The Evening Standard is published by Associated Newspapers Ltd which is the management company for five major newspapers; Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday, Evening Standard, London Metro, Ireland on Sunday as well as the advertising publication, The Loot. The Evening Standard is the only evening newspaper in London, published daily, and is generally perceived as being the first paper to break important news thus setting the agenda for the next day's news. It is a tabloid newspaper with certain assertions to being an 'intelligent' tabloid. Associated newspapers are known to be a company right of the middle, with its politics most characterised by The Daily Mail. It publishes four editions throughout the day (between 8.00am and 4.00pm) and has a daily circulation in excess of 424,000 and an estimated readership of 1 million. The paper also comes with a supplement four times a week and Metro Life on a Thursday which contains all the information concerning what is happening in London for the forthcoming week in relation to cinema, clubbing and the arts. The general readership is made up of commuters as the paper has its own newsstands set up around the capital as well as sellers at traffic lights and around train and underground stations.

  • Word count: 921
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Myth of co parenting

TASSERY Alice Assignment 6 "The Myth of Co-parenting: How it was Support to be. How it was" Hope Edelman "My Problem with Her Anger" Eric Bartels The first essay "The myth of Co-parenting: How it was Support to be. How it was" by Hope Edelman, was written for the anthology "The Bitch in the House (2002). The author writes about her discontent in her and her husband's way of parenting. The title of the article makes one assume a topic on struggles of stay-at home moms; the fact that men never help women raise children. The second is an article written by Eric Bartels extract from the essay "The Bastard on the Couch: 27 Men Try Really Hard to Explain Their Feelings About Love, Loss, Fatherhood, and Freedom," an anthology edited by Daniel Jones. The author expresses his feelings about his marriage and his wife and about the conflicts and efforts in it. The first part will describe the vision of the woman and her marriage; the second part will be on the Eric Bartel's essay and the man's vision of marriage. To finish, I will compare and contrast the two texts and explain: where do my sympathies lie? Hope Edelman looks at the realities of marriage and imbalanced parenting roles in her article "The Myth of Co-Parenting." Edelman uses her own marriage to reveal the unexpected difficulties that married couples experience when trying to share responsibilities of working

  • Word count: 906
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Jack the Ripper

Ripper Letters During the Autumn of Terror hundreds of letters were sent to the police and local press purporting to be written by the Whitechapel fiend. Most of them were deemed to be fakes written by either newspaper men trying to start a story or fools trying to incite more terror. Many Ripperologists believe them all to be hoaxes. Other experts believe some (specifically the Dear Boss letter, Saucy Jacky postcard, and From Hell letter) are genuine. A select few have been reproduced below. 'Dear Boss' letter Received on September 27th, 1888 at the Central News Agency, this letter was originally believed to be just another hoax. Three days later, the double murder of Stride and Eddowes made them reconsider, especially once they learned a portion of the latter's earlobe was found cut off from the body, eerily reminiscent of a promise made within the letter. The police deemed the "Dear Boss" letter important enough to reproduce in newspapers and postbills of the time, hoping someone would recognize the handwriting. A postcard received at the Central News Agency on October 1st, making direct reference to both the murders and the "Dear Boss" letter, is believed to have been written by the same hand. It is reproduced below. Whether or not the letter is a hoax, it is the first written reference which uses the name "Jack the Ripper" in reference to the Whitechapel murderer.

  • Word count: 874
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Currie, David P. The Constitution in Congress: The Federalist Period 1789 -1801. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997.

. Currie, David P. The Constitution in Congress: The Federalist Period 1789 -1801. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997. In this book the author deeply analyzes and describes the processes connected with the creation of The Federalist Papers and, hence, The Constitution of the United States of America. His work explores the political trends foverning in Amemrica in the time period from the First Congress (1789-1791) up to the Sixth and Seventh Congresses (1797-1801).1 Currie writes about the twelve years which have actually become the most important in the formation of the country, but, at the same time, were very intense and rich for the first and future law-makers and governments. In addition, in this book one may get acquainted with the main features and the most significant people of the Federalist period. The author explores not only the well-known issue concerning The Papers but their origins and reasons as well. 2. Dumbauld, Edward. The Declaration of Independence and What it Means Today. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1950 In this book the author presents the historical and political events and circumstances which accompanied the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and marked the end of British authority over the American Colonies,2 and analyzes the extend to which adoption of this document has influenced further growth and development of the

  • Word count: 839
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Press freedom and censorship are flipsides of the same coin - Which side should be applicable, given the focus of newspapers today?

Press freedom and censorship are flipsides of the same coin. Which side should be applicable, given the focus of newspapers today? (By Dick Clarke) The newspaper, as defined by the Webster's 1923 Dictionary, is a sheet of paper, printed and distributed at stated intervals, for conveying intelligence of passing events, advocating opinions, news, proceedings of legislative bodies, public announcements and advertisements. The Holy Bible states in the book of Jeremiah, "Publish and conceal not". According to the United Nations, a free press is a free press. Freedom of the press allows for the freedom expression and opinion. In today's ever-changing society, regulation or censorship of the press is a constant recurring theme. Journalists demand a free press, but with freedom come responsibility. In the year 2001, it was found that the Bush administration was stepping up efforts to block the world from learning the extent of destruction the US military was exacting on the Afghan population. The British Guardian newspaper reported that the US Defense Department has spent millions of dollars to prevent western media from seeing highly accurate photographs, taken by privately owned satellites, which show the effects of the bombing. While censorship of the press may be necessary to prevent negative mindset, the newspaper should not shield realities, which

  • Word count: 821
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Textual Assignment

Assignment - Textual Assignment This text is written using quite colloquial language in order to create a good rapport with the reader and audience, it does not contain any subject specific jargon or technical language as this piece is written for a quite wide ranging audience. The text, taken from a tabloid newspaper article is laid out into 3 columns. These 3 columns are broken up using three sub-headings which include 'Passionate', 'Story' and 'Angry'. This text is not written is any chronological order as events from different times are used, then re-used in the different sections. The article is written using three points of view and is broken up accordingly, the first section is written from the writers point of view, this section runs from the beginning of the article up until the end of the seventh paragraph. The second section is written from one of the characters point of view known in the article as 'Sally' and runs from the eighth paragraph all of the second column and up to the second sub-heading 'Story'. The third and final section is written from another characters point of view, this being the character of Mr Stevenson, this section runs through until the end of the article. In the first section, the introduction, the main points of the article are all summarized to give the reader an understanding about what the article is about and whether it interests

  • Word count: 814
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Communications Bill (Nov 2002) and its Effects on the Press.

Communications Bill (Nov 2002) and its Effects on the Press In November 2002 the government unveiled an update to their Communications Bill which was to be met with mixed feelings by broadcasters and journalists alike. In this essay I will examine the extent to which it has affected print journalism and the press, by looking at the views of those who know what it will do, journalists and media proprietors themselves and the MP's involved in composing the bill. The main worry surrounding print journalists and the press is that the new regulator of communications brought in by the government, 'Ofcom', will be a stranglehold on the things that are actually allowed to be written and therefore totally dismissing the concept of a 'free press'. Ofcom exists now to protect the interests of the consumers, according to the bill, but it is uncertain as to how far they will go to do this in terms of restricting what newspapers can say. The feeling is that, with Ofcom being a government regulatory body and therefore working closely with them, the government now has the freedom to control everything that goes out in newspapers to their favour, therefore making it impossible for any paper with an anti-Labour stance, or any paper that chooses to disagree with them in the future, to do so publicly through their own newspapers. The government, however, more notably Culture secretary Tessa

  • Word count: 800
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Thought Control - How the Media Decides What is Important.

Title: Thought Control - How the Media Decides What is Important In light of the geopolitical situation in the world since September 11th, 2001, and the wars currently being fought, I believe it is essential to examine why some wars are given an absolute amount of coverage, while others go unnoticed. For example, the United States has thousands of troops occupying both Iraq and Afghanistan, and over the past year, media around the world have been covering these events. But who is writing about the war in the Congo, not the Democratic Republic of Congo, but the other Congo. No articles in the newspaper, no stories on the news, nothing. Thousands of people are losing their lives, just as in Iraq and Afghanistan, but the world is not paying attention. Why? Well, simply because the media companies are not covering these wars. I agree that media companies should deliver the stories that are most relevant to their subscribers, but then, does this not turn into a matter of delivering only the news their subscribers want to hear, and what the media companies want them to hear, not what is really happening. Moreover, it is just naïve not to believe that the executives behind the scenes of these gigantic media conglomerates are not constantly in discussion with national heads of state about the content that should and should not be published or aired. This is not to say that

  • Word count: 788
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Describe what is meant by the term 'moral panic', using your own words as far as possible - Cite at least one example of a 'moral panic'.

DD100 TMA 07 Question Part (b) Describe what is meant by the term 'moral panic', using your own words as far as possible. Cite at least one example of a 'moral panic'. The term moral panic is a concept introduced by the social sciences to help understand certain problems that arise in society from time to time. Periodically society is faced with a problem that threatens the moral standards of the day. Geoffrey Pearson in his book Hooligan came up with the idea that the older generation of every period look back on their younger days as a time of morality, comparing it with the immorality of the present day youth. The institutions responsible for law and order in whichever time period the narrative is referring to are unable to contain the crime problem. The notion of a moral panic attempts to understand such claims. Stanley Cohen used the notion of moral panic whilst examining the disturbances between the mods and the rockers' in Clacton in 1964. In his view the media reaction was excessive, generating widespread public concern and causing the authorities to react stronger in later incidents and ultimately fuelling the original problem. The initial clashes between mods and rockers' in 1964 were relatively small. The press arrived the following day and proceeded to interview participants and members of the public. As seen in TV07, interviewees who were there

  • Word count: 750
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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