ICT GCSE Major Project : A Media magazine aimed at teenagers in the school

ICT GCSE Major Project Analysis Project Title: A Media magazine aimed at teenagers in the school The Situation: Ras Al Khaimah is a small emirate (equivalent to a county) based in the United Arab Emirates in the Middle East. It is about 80 km from Dubai, a neighboring emirate with an entertaining and lively capital. Ras Al Khaimah is a small city with all types of nationalities such as English, Pakistani, Egyptian and of course Arabs living there. It has few public facilities, only last year was Ras Al Khaimah's first shopping centre built which has a cinema, restaurants and a variety of shops and there are few other entertainment's in Ras Al Khaimah, so many people travel to Dubai to be able to fill up their social lives. Most people worship Islam, and there are a numerous number of mosques in the city, there is one church in Ras Al Khaimah where Christians can go to worship. Ras Al Khaimah English Speaking School or RAKESS is a moderately sized school, based in Ras Al Khaimah (in which you must be able to speak English), which has around 350 students in all of primary and secondary. It is a private school for both boys and girls, and has many facilities including a swimming pool, tennis courts and 4 fully equipped I.C.T labs. One of the problems of Ras Al Khaimah is its social life, it only has one shopping centre and many people have to entertain themselves by

  • Word count: 4838
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

Issues Risk and Crisis Communication Critique and Case Study

Issues Risk and Crisis Communication Critique: James Hardie Industries (JHI) INTRODUCTION Coombs (2007) defines a crisis as "The perception of an unpredictable event that threatens important expectancies of stakeholders and can seriously impact an organisations performance and generate negative outcomes." (p.3) Coombs goes on to explain how crises in organisations should always be expected and there should be a certain expectation to how the organisation should act. Woodyard (1998) describes the universal characteristics of a crisis, "they are surprise; insufficient information; escalating flow of events; loss of control; intense scrutiny from outside; siege mentality; panic; and short term focus."(p.10) James Hardie Industries had a major weakness of not having a crisis communication plan already prepared for the organisation prior to the crisis occurring to turn a violate disaster into a positive reinvention opportunity. Before a crisis occurs, warning signs should be identified and acted upon in order to prevent a crisis from happening. James Hardie Industries ignored the warning signs which proved to be fatal to the organisation. When the company had a shortfall of funds for victims of asbestos, they pleaded that they were "fully funded" to provide for claimants and stakeholders. Australia's dominant asbestos producer used public relations in a negative way by

  • Word count: 4723
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

David Beckham

In the 21st century the media holds an ever increasing effect on the day to day lives of celebrities and sports figures. In this essay I intend to highlight and analyse the Medias portrayal of one of our countries top sports personalities. I will discuss how different forms of the media have obsessed with the highs and lows of England football captain, David Beckhams much publicised career. It is amazing to think that merely five years ago this man was possibly the most hated person in England due to the Medias exposure of an event that took place in a simple football match. Beckhams image was soon to change after he presented amazing levels of character both on and off the field. Due to the media, Beckhams status has changed from a bad tempered youth to a national hero known as Captain Marvel! This essay will explore how David Beckhams position as an international icon has elevated throughout years of media attention, and find evidence to prove how the media has made him into the much adored role model he has become. "News may be true, but it is not truth, and reporters and officials seldom see it same way" (James Reston, US journalist) Everywhere you look you see sport intertwined into everyday life, be it on the television, in your back yard, in schools, universities or in social networks. Nobody can escape the influence of sport, either as a spectator or a participant -

  • Word count: 4717
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

Racism In the Media.

RACISM IN THE MEDIA Introduction Mainstream media across the world have been accused of 'virtually whitewashing' the airwaves. Many ethnic minority groups claim to experience hostility, marginalisation and discrimination regularly from many media institutions. There is an endless struggle for minorities to gain professional access to the media, as the monochromatic view of black people as scrounging immigrants, dysfunctional families, drug-dealing thugs and pimps fails to go away. Factors such as state-ownership, Trans-National Corporations and major advertisers have transformed the creative sphere of the media into a capitalistic, profit-obsessed empire, and view the role of the ethnic minority as a hindrance to ratings and the status quo themselves. Commercialism and capitalistic structures are taking over the media's promise to be creative and democratic. Racism in the media is not a process of name-calling or stone throwing, but it is a noticeable lack of ethnic minorities participating in the media and the way in which they are excluded from structures of the media. Many English speaking communities maintain their cultural control through mainstream media with a peculiar form of professional standards called 'our style our standard'. These keep out well qualified first generation ethnic migrant journalists and broadcasters from mainstream media. British and American

  • Word count: 4562
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

"UK national newspapers have adopted a racist attitude in their coverage of recent international events (i.e.; terrorism, asylum seekers, war with Iraq)." Discuss.

Ismaeel Mohammed Nakhuda Journalism Issues JN2031 Assignment 2 4. "UK national newspapers have adopted a racist attitude in their coverage of recent international events (i.e.; terrorism, asylum seekers, war with Iraq)." Discuss. Introduction For the purpose of discussing the above statement it would be suitable to first of all note that the question at hand is rather loose, for the purpose of this approximately 3000 word paper certain aspects shall be prioritised solely with the aim of presenting a rather much more thorough analysis of the issues which need discussing. To begin with the term 'UK national newspapers' could be considered to be a collective term within which many various broadsheets and tabloids would come under. Investigating all the various newspapers published nationally within the UK is a rather cumbersome task, possibly a dissertation would be able to give full justice to such an analysis. Hence it was decided that in order to make this investigation much more thorough The Daily Mail and The Mirror would be selected. Reasons for selecting these two papers are simply because they represent the two extremes of the left and the right in the social paradigm of the UK (McNair: 1998). We find The Daily Mail -bastion of true-blue British attitudes- to be a right wing paper, on the other hand we find The Mirror to be a left wing paper, although it should be

  • Word count: 3850
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

To what extent has the support of the Sun newspaper been crutial to success in British general elections since 1992?

ALAN RODEN JOURNALISM AND GOVERNMENT ROBERT BEVERIDGE MAY 2004 TO WHAT EXTENT HAS THE SUPPORT OF THE SUN NEWSPAPER BEEN CRUCIAL TO SUCCESS IN BRITISH GENERAL ELECTIONS SINCE 1992? Ever since Burke characterised the press as a Fourth Estate more important than the Three Estates in Parliament, the power of the press, and especially its political power, has been debated. From the Zinoviev Letter of 1924 to the present day, newspapers have been accused of having swung the results of elections, none more so than the Sun. The day after the Conservative Party's general election victory of April 1992, the Sun's front-page headline declared: "It's the Sun wot won it." Since then, psephologists have closely examined the newspaper's arrogant self-proclamation and its impact upon the subsequent elections in 1997 and 2001. No political party in over thirty years has won a general election while facing concerted personal opposition from the Sun. Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, who now owns 175 newspapers world-wide, acquired the tabloid title in 1969. The paper backed Labour in the 1970 general election, but has not backed a loser since then. Politicians of all persuasions court the Sun because it has the largest circulation and readership in Britain. It is also read, politicians believe, by millions of people at election time who do not normally follow politics very closely. It was in

  • Word count: 3831
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

Press freedom gives journalists the right to present stories to the public that are in the public interest. What is the public interest and why is it so important?

ALAN RODEN NEWS AND JOURNALISM IN THE UK ROB MELVILLE MARCH 2004 PRESS FREEDOM GIVES JOURNALISTS THE RIGHT TO PRESENT STORIES TO THE PUBLIC THAT ARE IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST. WHAT IS THE PUBLIC INTEREST AND WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT? ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS IN THE CONTEXT OF PRESS REGULATION AND CONTROL. Problems over media coverage often hinge on the "public interest." This is tied to the freedom of the press and the "duty" of reporters and journalists to inform the public about what is in their interest to know. However, the excuse of public interest is often used to justify stories that have no direct relevance and only serve to satisfy public curiosity and boost circulation or viewing figures. The history of the free press is also linked to the history of press regulation. More recently this has become an argument between the merits or otherwise of self-regulation, and public interest is so important because it the main dividing figure in the complicated equation of press control, media ethics and press regulation. John Milton articulated the concept of press freedom as early as 1644 when he demanded: "Give me liberty to know, to utter and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties."1 The abolition of the Court of Star Chamber, which attempted to ban public newspapers; the ending of press licensing and Fox's libel act of 1792 further paved the way

  • Word count: 3641
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

Is journalism a profession? What arguments and evidence would you put forth to support or deny any claim that journalism has to being a profession?

MA in Mass Communications Option 1 Is journalism a profession? What arguments and evidence would you put forth to support or deny any claim that journalism has to being a profession? Journalists play an intrinsic part of the media landscape, which in turn reflects and influences society. However, as a profession it is different to comparable occupations. Accountants, lawyers, teachers and doctors are expected to undergo unique, specific and vigorous training processes. The very nature of their occupations requires high levels of knowledge and skills, which their respective professional bodies ensure through high standards of entry qualifications and rigorous training and examinations attainments. Professional codes of practice regulate behaviour and determine continued membership, which has maintained high standards of professional integrity and historically given these groups a privileged position in the hierarchy of professions. Journalism has traditionally been viewed as a more vocational career. As such, until recently, there have been fewer opportunities to study it as a formal subject. Related associations are few and regulation is arguably more relaxed that in other professions. But do these fundamental differences make journalism any less a profession? Are indeed journalists themselves any less professional in their work? I would argue that whilst

  • Word count: 3635
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

Analysis of political ad "First Choice"

Analysis of political ad "First Choice" "Politics is fundamentally a communicative activity. Because people and thier governments organize and maintian connections to each other through communication, the process of democratic rule centers onthe ability to create and preserve a system of mutual trust and respect through communication. Candidates for public office communicate thier values, goals, and objectives through thier actions, public speeches, statements to the press, public mailings and advertisements" (pg 9. Politics is Communication). Keeping this in mind, explains the importance of studying and analyzing a political ad. Advertisements are one of the most wide spread ways candidates are able to express thier points of views and the audience should be aware of how to analyze the ads presented to them. The television ad's importance has been impressed in the past when candidates have lost political races based on one ad's ability to permanently impress the audience. The idea that,"Part of the fault rests with a public more inclined to gether political information from inadvertent exposure to ads than from news accounts, attention to candidate's speeches, or examination of position papers" (Broadsides to Broadcasts pg. xxi) reiterates this point. As a public, everyone should be aware of how to analyze a political ad to be able to deem it acceptable. The

  • Word count: 3557
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay

This paper provides a written analysis on the marketing strategies used by the local traveling magazine - "Hong Kong Discovery" of how it uses marketing and promotional tools to survive in the competitive magazine world.

Marketing and promotion ass 1 Table of Contents . Introduction P. 3 2. Company Background P. 4 2.1 Magazine Background 2.2 Goals and Objectives 2.3 Target Market 3. Marketing Mix P. 7 3.1 Product 3.2 Price 3.3 Place 3.4 Promotion 3.5 Strategies and Tactics 4. Situation Analysis P. 15 4.1 SWOT Analysis 4.2 PEST Analysis 4.3 Competitor Analysis 5. Conclusion 6. References 7. Appendix . Introduction This paper provides a written analysis on the marketing strategies used by the local traveling magazine - "Hong Kong Discovery" of how it uses marketing and promotional tools to survive in the competitive magazine world. This is the only commercialized magazine concerning hiking and natural environment in Hong Kong, as it is new and unique with less interested groups comparing with magazines of other genre, therefore, marketing strategies are especially important for them, in order to attract consumers attention, and many of the promotional tools it use is much different from other types of magazine available in Hong Kong and the association between the magazine and the non-profit organization make it more success, this is interesting to investigate and arouse my interest. These are the reasons of choosing this particular magazine in doing this essay. 2. Company Background 2.1 Magazine Background

  • Word count: 3473
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
Access this essay