The connection between Levinas's philosophy and particularly his concept of 'the other' and it's link with journalism.

The connection between Levinas's philosophy and particularly his concept of 'the other' and it's link with journalism. In philosophy, ethics helps us to make a decision, but it is very difficult to give 'yes' or 'no' answers. For Levinas there is always a limit and perspective. The fact that there is 'the other', makes ethics much more interesting; the concept of 'the other' gives respect to each individual in their individuality. In making a link between journalism and Levinas's philosophy, it is best to consider his views on suffering. Those who died in the holocaust cannot and could not speak for themselves. One might argue that journalism gives the people who cannot easily speak for themselves, a voice and mode by which to do so. However, in contrast with this, Levinas upholds that one can only give testimony or bear witness in the first person and that generalisations do not work as they do not encompass the individual other. In this case study I intend to put forward both the negative and positive aspects of journalism while taking into account the other. The case study which I focus on will be there to show how Levinas's concepts are relevant and valid in journalism and the media. The Society of Professional Journalists "Believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those

  • Word count: 3472
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Is it possible to talk of a global public sphere in respect of global news?

MEDS 2003: ADVANCED TELEVISION STUDIES NOREEN RAJPUT ESSAY ASSIGNMENT Is it possible to talk of a global public sphere in respect of global news? This essay evaluates the usefulness and validity of the concept of a global public sphere in relation to the media, in particular the news. The concept of the public sphere is best known in its formulation by the German critical theorist Jurgen Habermas in the early 1960's. This essay will first demonstrate a brief theoretical discussion of the concepts of globalisation and the public sphere. Secondly, in order to determine whether or not there is a global public sphere in respect of the news, I will discuss the idea that the news is a complex and bias process and that its content is heavily based on the news values of professional organisations. I will also argue that the news is a commodity and a form of entertainment. Thirdly, my essay will address some of the evidence which implies that there is a globalizing tendency in the news and finally, I consider whether the evidence is adequate to support the notion that 'a global public sphere in the respect of global news' actually exists. In order to discuss the possibility of a global public sphere in terms of global news, it is first important to define the key terms themselves. According to Sparks 'There is no one set of ideas that we can point to as

  • Word count: 3429
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Overcoming Cultural Obstacles: the use of imagery and syntax for the creation of a connection with the reader

Overcoming Cultural Obstacles: the use of imagery and syntax for the creation of a connection with the reader Connection to one's intended audience is central to the conveying of one's message. It is only in this relationship that a writer or artist has with their audience that space for their literature or art is created. The authors of the literature I read this summer are presented with a sizable problem for these women are faced with the hardship of connecting with an audience that cannot in any normal circumstance understand or appreciate their writings due to the barriers presented by race, gender and language. These roadblocks came into existence during a time period known as the Enlightenment, an intellectual revolution in which the definition of self became determined through the comparison of one self with others and the world in which we live (Gay 59). During this movement the mental space in which all things not of oneself exist was created, this being "the other." The persistence of this ideology results in the limitations of thought on the behalf of western cultures in that all things foreign find themselves categorized and discarded. I was interested in investigating how the literary tools of imagery and syntax aid sub-continental female authors to overcome the label of being 'the other' in order to establish a necessary connection with their reader because

  • Word count: 3401
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Communication Theory

COMMUNICATION THEORY COMMUNICATION THEORY (COM 502) 7 NOVEMBER 2008 INTRODUCTION COMMUNICATION is the process of sharing our ideas, thoughts, and feelings with other people and having those ideas, thoughts, and feelings understood by the people we are talking with. When we communicate we speak, listen, and observe. The way we communicate is a learned style. As children we learn from watching our parents and other adults communicate. As an adult we can learn to improve the way we communicate by observing others who communicate effectively, learning new skills, and practicing those skills. Communication can best be summarized as the transmission of a message from a sender to a receiver in an understandable manner. The importance of effective communication is immeasurable in the world of business and in personal life. Communication is an important aspect in our lives and an even more important aspect in the lives of people who play the roles of leaders. From a business perspective, effective communication is an absolute must, because it commonly accounts for the difference between success and failure or profit and loss. It has become clear that effective business communication is critical to the successful operation of modern enterprise. Every business person needs to understand the fundamentals of effective communication. The field of communications is very

  • Word count: 3338
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Henry Jenkins and fan communities

Assignment Cover Sheet School of Communication Arts College of Arts Student Name: Nicola Parkinson Student Number: 16520572 Unit Name and Number: 01053 Researching Media Audiences Tutorial Day and Time: Friday 2-3pm Tutor: Luke Carman Title of Assignment: RMA Essay Question1 Length: 2,869 words (Actual number of words written, excluding reference list) Due Date: 30th September 2010 Date Submitted: 30th September 2010 DECLARATION I hold a copy of this assignment that I can produce if the original is lost or damaged. I hereby certify that no part of this assignment/product has been copied from any other student's work or from any other source except where due acknowledgement is made in the assignment. No part of this assignment/product has been written/produced for me by another person except where such collaboration has been authorised by the subject lecturer/tutor concerned. Signature: ...Nicola Parkinson ............................................................................... Note: Assignments will not be marked if the above declaration has not been signed. "You've got fifteen seconds, impress me." It is with this phase that we can start to understand just how great the power of the audience is becoming. An ordinary young male, with regular clothes and scruffy hair is the poster child for the new interactive audience. He, just

  • Word count: 3325
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Assess whether the Northcliffe Revolution is a useful way of understanding developments in the UK press in the period 1890-1930?

(a) Assess whether the 'Northcliffe Revolution' is a useful way of understanding developments in the UK press in the period 1890-1930? THE NORTHCLIFFE REVOLUTION USEFUL OR NOT? Introduction The intention of this paper is to explore the notion that Lord Northcliffe, the owner of popular papers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries such as the Daily Mail, had such a pivotal role in the press of the epoch that he could be easily described as possessing such incredible power as to revolutionise a growing industry, such as that of the print based press. To be able to develop upon, or dismantle, such a widely debated topic of the era in which the press industries boomed and caused this vast and historical moment of the public communications field, I intend to analyse both the suggestions which support and the suggestions which disagree with the notion that Northcliffe had such a pivotal role in defining how the press developed in the period 1890-1930. Questions have been raised as to whether or not the so-called 'Northcliffe Revolution' is really a useful way of understanding developments in British press in the above-mentioned period, 1890-1930. Francis Williams who was the 1940's press officer to Labour M.P. Atley claimed that Northcliffe started a revolution in the press industry, whereas Jean Chalaby would argue that Northcliffe didn't produce revolutionary

  • Word count: 3283
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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19th Century Slave Narratives: When Literacy doesn't necessarily equal Freedom.

EXAMINATION NUMBER: 45002 9th Century Slave Narratives: When Literacy doesn't necessarily equal Freedom. The 19th Century was a difficult time for writers, with the number of writers increasing faster than the market for it (especially towards the end of the century). Several writers of the period (notably Henry James and Walt Whitman) berated the lack of a literary canon, feeling that there wasn't a typically American style of writing, that there was too great an influence from English writers, and promptly set about trying to create this distinctive American literature. They failed to notice, however, that there was already an existing canon of literature, based on true events; a style that stood out from the rest because it was written from the heart and helped to effect change across the country. The slave narrative was at first an abolitionist tool, a method of trying to show people the cruel nature of slavery, however the genre evolved until it was so much more - spanning the gap between autobiography and creative literature. Indeed, although most narratives follow a similar format, as more tales emerged, it was no longer enough to remain strictly autobiographical - a narrative's success relied on "the narrator's ability to create a common bond between reader and narrator"1. In this essay I intend to concentrate on two authors who created this bond between their

  • Word count: 3278
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Oz Magazine - The Voice of Dissent

Oz Magazine - The Voice of Dissent In an Australian context, the birth of alternative journalism in the 1960s came a time when the basic world-view of capitalist society came under challenge by an increasingly discontented middle class, driving an ideological struggle between mainstream and alternative lifestyle movements. When the satirical and controversial Oz Magazine emerged in 1963, it boldly set out to challenge the mores and values of what was then a conservative society. This essay will analyse twelve issues of Oz Magazine from 1963 and 1964, in order to discover the social and political role of Oz during this significant era of change. Briefly tracing the history of Australia back to the counter-culture of the sixties, this essay will outline the chronological events surrounding the birth of Oz. Subsequently this essay will explain the methodologies used to analyse Oz, followed by an analysis of the magazines. By systematically analysing Oz, this essay will seek to explain the social and political role of the magazine in terms of the historically significant events that surrounded the magazine during the 1960s. The 1960s began as an era of great political stability and increasing prosperity for Australians (Townsend 1988). Robert Menzies was Prime Minister from 1949 until 1966, and his fervently "pro-British nationalism and sleepy social and political conservatism

  • Word count: 3169
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Mass Medium: The new(TM) versus the Old(TM).

Kiegan Vallely 07839062 Mass Medium: 'The new' versus 'the Old'. My intention is to probe into the world of media and discuss various theoretical and conceptual frameworks used across media and cultural studies. I will explore work of different key theorists in media and cultural studies. I shall also examine the different approaches to textual and audience analysis and study how sport is represented through the media, as well as looking at the cultural and ideological issues that operate through these representations. I shall summarise key points of my chosen title and implement current issues/theories into my selected sport - football adjacent to the theme 'The champions League so far'. It is apparent that sport and the mass media have a particularly strong association going back to the eighteenth century (Rowe 2004). Horne (2006, pg 41) states how the media helped to construct what is sport, and how governing bodies for various sport came into effect after newspapers started publishing league tables during the late 19th century. Sport and media was further strengthened during mid 20th century by the arrival of televisions and today it is quite difficult to imagine sport without television. But, what is Sport? Nicholson.M (2007, p.4) notes that sport is best understood as having three core dimensions (Guttman 1978). First, it has a physical dimension Second,

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  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Using the example of Mods, How did different subcultures distinguish themselves in Britain during the 1960's? In the 1960's, young people questioned Britain and America's materialism and cultural and political norms,

Using the example of Mods, How did different subcultures distinguish themselves in Britain during the 1960's? In the 1960's, young people questioned Britain and America's materialism and cultural and political norms, much as they've always done. Seeking a better world, some used music, politics, and alternative lifestyles to create what came to be known as the counterculture. Briton's in that era faced many controversial issues-from civil rights, female equality, nuclear arms, and the environment to drug use, sexual freedom, and nonconformity. Many members of the counterculture saw their own lives as ways to express political and social beliefs. Personal appearance, song lyrics, and the arts were some of the methods used to make both individual and communal statements. Due to this reason many different subcultures formed, each with very different views and also very different taste. It has been argued that structural conditions, especially persistent, structural contradictions, often experienced as class problems, are a basic generating force for subculture. Cultural conditions, particularly those generated by social class, may interact with the apparent middle class consensus and, when assisted by neighbourhood traditions and specific historic circumstances, act in shaping the cultural form of a subculture.1 One cultural form common in a subculture is fashion and its

  • Word count: 3100
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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