Critically consider the relationship between the media and dance music culture in Britain after its take-off in 1987.

Critically consider the relationship between the media and dance music culture in Britain after its take-off in 1987. This essay will attempt to explore and show the rise of predominately dance music as well as acid, acid techno and drum and base within Ibiza, how it came to form in Ibiza and who founded it there. This essay will also include how and why dance music was brought over to Britain, its impact on and within British society, the moral panics that followed this and just how tough the government and police acted upon this. Finally this essay will examine just how huge and powerful Ibiza has come as well as the many outdoor events and festivals that are prominent today within dance music culture as well as the dug scene and how it effects the clubbers today, as dance music would not have spiralled to how enormous it is today without drugs, predominately ecstasy, acid (LSD) and MDMA. The early rise of dance music and the rise of it within Ibiza can be traced back to the late 1980's, at this time Ibiza was seen to be divided between two social status, firstly the rich, who saw it as an upper class and expensive holiday destination, to embark upon Ibiza even if middle class would redeem you as more wealthy than maybe one actually was. At the other end of the spectrum of people who holidayed to Ibiza were 'hippies', hippies did this as they did not agree and conform

  • Word count: 3035
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Critically evaluate the relationship between newspapers and their readership between 1896 and 1950 in the UK.

MS 203 Histories of Public Communication Tom O'Malley 98029940 B. Critically evaluate the relationship between newspapers and their readership between 1896 and 1950 in the UK. B. Critically evaluate the relationship between newspapers and their readership between 1896 and 1950 in the UK. Introduction In this essay I will explain some of the history behind the origins of the press, and the developments that were to help its rise and growth. I will also look at the society of the time and how it had been changing and developing. To do this I will link ideas of how these changes directly affected information exchange and newspapers. Also as a means of clarifying the style of newspapers of the time I will identify how ownership shaped their looks and viewpoints, with particular reference to Lord Northcliffe and the Daily Mail. This study of Northcliffe will also show the innovations in how relationships between newspapers and readership developed. This will also address how the press barons of the time adapted in an attempt to woo a greater audience. I will discuss nineteenth to early twentieth century culture changes and discuss how it was a time when society was to change the medium of newspapers. The essay will also show how newspapers responded to the pressures enforced upon them and how they were to change society themselves. To understand the relationship between

  • Word count: 3024
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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The media in Japan is controlled by big business and politicians - discuss

Modern Japanese Society BS2595 The media in Japan is controlled by big business and politicians David Talbott 990205159 When asked to name world's best selling newspaper very few people outside of Japan would be able to give the correct answer, namely that of the Yomiuri Shimbun, which is printed almost 15 million times each day. Even its closest rival, Asahi Shimbun, which sells around 12.5 millions copies a day completely eclipses the 3.3 million circulation of The Sun, Britain's most popular daily newspaper. The Japanese newspaper market is in fact huge: the average Japanese household receives 1.2 papers per day, almost one and a half times more than in the UK. The TV market is similar in size. Over 6 in 10 households own a television and the average Japanese person watches four hours of TV a day. Given the size of the market and in light of the important role the media is expected to play in a modern society, it is disturbing to note that the Japanese media is consistently criticised in studies by western scholars. It is often charged with delivering a standardised product that limits customer choice. Some critics attack the system even more vociferously stating that journalists and politicians collude to form "information cartels" that serve to "the creation of an informationally inferior product where the people do not get 'all the news that's fit to print'"

  • Word count: 3006
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Facets of democracy.

One facet of democracy is such that it is the people who determine the leader of a particular state. The United States of America can be regarded as the country that gave rise to this concept as the nation state was born from a war that fought for it. A national electorate chooses the president of the United States. Most Americans learn about the choices they face in national elections not from personal contact with politicians, from public forums, or even from conversations with others, but from the mass media. President Thomas Jefferson emphasized that the public "may safely be trusted to hear everything true and false, and to form a correct judgment between them"1 from the press. The First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech and of the press was established on the basis of this faith.2 The established press fulfilled this purpose and that of fostering citizen understanding and involvement in the political campaign, thus inviting extensive participation in the exclusive form of government termed "democracy."3 It can thus be stated that democracy can result only from the Free press. It is needed to provide vital information that is required to make an intelligent decision in an election campaign. As a result, the media is a necessary instrument in political communication. Communication has evolved as a direct result of technology. There has been an explosion in the

  • Word count: 2981
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Commentary on Roch Sulima's book Antropologia codziennosci (Anthropology of everyday life).

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRfviITHUF-13WG6L5_J3hsjNo9zFLftnmbZoF24Qn9PLp8R0HwoMTXwO8W ________________ Anthropology of everyday life https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRRuqsQcmb7YWAI_LRl44pVpmXfSM7d5nlPbgsqg3JdjPiAPGE0lg . In the modern world there is such a sphere of reality that are not worthy attention, because they are obvious, and what is more, everyone knows everything about it. Such is the realm of the everyday life, and that is what everyday life is very interesting, because by its obviousness gives the impression of social adjustment habits that cause lack of awareness. Speculation on the nature of everyday life leads to the discovery of what appears to be natural, and they really are the consequences of knowledge and experience over which we do not think, and which the foundations of our behaviour are. The concept of everyday life is accurately described by Roch Sulima in her book ‘’Antropologia codziennosci’ (Anthropology of everyday life)’. He stated that “everyday life is unavoidable’’ (p.20). It is practiced and does not need a definition. The meaning of everyday life is always just ahead as the informal sense of conversation. For everyday there is no return. Immediately melts and solidifies in the myth, in what is discursively inexpressible. Anthropology of everyday life is “a diary of

  • Word count: 2966
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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African news article in terms of journalistic bias, objectivity, a balance of perspectives

University of Cape Town Faculty of Humanities Essay cover page FAM203S - Essay 1 Name: Yan Zhen Xu Student Number: XXXYAN001 Course Code: FAM203S Tutor: Adam Haupt Due Date: 5th September 2005 Plagiarism Declaration . I know that plagiarism is wrong. Plagiarism is to use another's work and pretend that it is one's own. 2. I have used the Harvard convention for citation and referencing. Each significant contribution to, and quotation in, this assignment from the work(s) of other people has been attributed, and has been cited and referenced. 3. This assignment is my own work. 4. I have not allowed, and will not allow, anyone to copy my work with the intention of passing it off as his or her own work. Signature:____________________________________ A news article published on the 22 June 2005 was found on an African news website, www.afrol.com. The subject of this news article is based on Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, the new deputy president of South Africa. This news article will be textually analyzed below with the aid of an international news article found on www.bbc.co.uk of the same subject. The international news article will only be used to aid in positioning and pin pointing the African news article in terms of journalistic bias, objectivity, a balance of perspectives, 'spin doctoring', and/or image management. The essay will detect the presence of

  • Word count: 2956
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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The biggest difference between cultural industries or the media and other industries, is that while conventional industries produce goods that are tangible, media industries produce goods that are both tangible as well as intangible.

The biggest difference between cultural industries or the media and other industries, is that while conventional industries produce goods that are tangible, media industries produce goods that are both tangible as well as intangible. Media industries can be seen as providing food for thought. Many common features are found in both industries. The idea of consumption changes from merely buying goods to choosing goods that gives us identity. The media provides these goods. Both media as well as conventional industries are primarily concerned with the consumer. Supply and demand is a vital factor in both industries. If there were no demand for a commodity like orange juice, then production of that commodity would diminish. Similarly, if there were no demand for a particular newspaper, the newspapers circulation would diminish and be terminated. Both industries are beginning to see a high level of both vertical, as well as horizontal integration. With regards to vertical integration, Investopedia.com defines it as when a "company expands its business into areas that are at different points of the same production path" http://www.investopedia.com/terms/v/verticalintegration.asp An example of this would be a car company like Ferrari manufacturing its own tyres. In media, this can be seen with the daily news in that it has its own printing press. An example of Horizontal

  • Word count: 2951
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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Jonathan Bignell (1997) argues that the magazine is "just a collection a signs" (Bignell 1997: 78)

Jonathan Bignell (1997) argues that the magazine is "just a collection a signs" (Bignell 1997: 78). These signs may include paradigmatic and syntagmatic elements such as the title of the magazine, the fonts used, the layout, the colours, the texture of the paper, the language adopted, the content of the articles and so on, and each of these signs have been chosen to generate a meaning. The magazine is therefore a complex collection of signs that can be extensively decoded and analysed by its reader - "women's magazines communicate their mythic meaning by means of signs, thus their representations of the imaginary are dependent on the symbolic, the signs which do the communicating" (Bignell 1997: 78). Signs however, consisting (according to Saussure) of two elements, a signifier and a signified, only gain meaning when "it has someone to mean to" (Williamson 1978: 40). The reader is therefore very important and will bring his/her own interpretations to the texts by drawing on their own cultural values and perceptual codes. As Daniel Chandler argues, "'decoding' involves not simply basic recognition and comprehension of what a text 'says' but also the interpretation and evaluation of its meaning with reference to relevant codes" (Chandler, web source: Semiotics for Beginners). As the relationship between the signifier and the signified is arbitrary and meaning is rooted in

  • Word count: 2943
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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New media culture/ Cyberculture

Topic 2: It would not be too much of an exaggeration to say new media is exploding at a grand scale that has never been witnessed before. Its application and involvement in every aspect of our lives are countless, and the ripples of its effect broaden so vastly that our society nowadays has called it as a culture: new media culture. It is interesting to know how this new culture creates or blurs the boundaries between fiction and reality as well as how our everyday lives are described today, thus raising some consequences of this new culture in terms of social and communication. New media culture/Cyberculture is the culture where ways of our lives are shaped by using computer networks for various aspects from communication, education, business to entertainment. By serious researches from the first use of the term cyberculture in 1986 by novel writer William Gibson to its popular use in early 1990s by other Internet activists, Lister et al (2009, p. 317) summarizes 'it is a culture in which machines play a particularly important role'. These researchers claim that the elements which make up this culture include 'communication networks, programming, software', 'the issues of artificial intelligence, virtual reality, artificial life, and the human-computer interface' (Lister et al, 2009, p. 317). To clarify, the work of Dr. Flew (2008, p. 24) points out the nature of

  • Word count: 2937
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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To what extent do the texts Heart of Darkness, Black Mischief and A Passage to India represent examples of colonial discourse?

Title: To what extent do the texts Heart of Darkness, Black Mischief and A Passage to India represent examples of colonial discourse? In beginning this essay it would be helpful to define what is meant by colonial discourse. This term refers to the dominant ideology within British society during the time of the empire and thus can be defined as discourse which supports the action of colonisation. The colonial ideal, (the term for colonial discourse in its undiluted form), suggests that both the coloniser and the colonised benefit from the action of colonisation. The colonies benefit in that they are becoming more developed and civilised through the adoption of western practices and technologies and the coloniser benefits from, as Hobson put it "The export of surplus capital".1 Thornton cited in J. Meyer's Fiction and the Colonial Experience explains how this was the prevailing ideology within the British government until well after the unit texts I will be focussing upon were written: - The Imperial principle, animating an imperial code, remained the dynamic in the thought and action of the governing classes of England until after the close of the twentieth century's second world war.2 This essay will attempt to explore and suggest ways in which three chosen texts, (all British novels written during the period of the British Empire), both support or oppose this discourse.

  • Word count: 2925
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Media Studies
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