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University Degree: Social Work

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  1. Marked by a teacher

    Working With Others

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    Sophia said that she felt very unsure and felt people would judge her if she spoke and Kylie ,the chairperson, who was a confident assertive leader felt that we should all contribute more in discussions as she found it hard to reach a consensus without it being all her own point of view . Shakira, the scribe felt it was very difficult to write down the points as we were all talking at once and not agreeing on decisions to the best course of action to use with our scenario.

    • Word count: 861
  2. Reflection on Social Work Practise. I thought that enacting to set aside time to do some record keeping would meet the requirements of the Social Work Codes of Practice which emphasise meeting relevant standards of practice and working in a lawful, safe a

    I reflected back to the day in supervision when I had enquired from the PE whether my recording was according to agency procedures and had been reassured that it was, but that I still had to improve on certain details which would make the recording more informative. I felt that I should set aside this time to ensure that all the information pertaining to service users had been properly recorded. O'Rourke (2009 online) concurs that "social workers need to treat recording as a priority because it is crucial as evidence.

    • Word count: 789
  3. PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION

    Many people mentioned their principles of community organization. Among that, Principles mentioned by C. F. McNeil, Ray Johns and David F. Demarche are important. The Final Excerpt from Community Organization, Theory and Principles, by Murray G. Ross, is one of the most recent formulations of principle that have appeared, as well as one of the most systematic. PRINCIPLES IN COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FOR SOCIAL WELFARE By C. F. McNeil McNeil has mentioned the following principles: 1. Community Organization for social welfare is concerned with people and their needs. Its objective is to enrich human life by bringing about and maintaining a progressively more effective adjustment between social welfare resources and social welfare needs.

    • Word count: 909
  4. Book review. Exploring Disability; Author BARNES, C et al. The book was written in a sociological view about how disabled people are excluded from the mainstream of economic and social review.

    The author, also on sociological insights brought conventional thinking and practise regarding disability. He argued that disability was referred to as Physical, impairment, disabled, deaf or blind rather than the English speaking words which have lost its meanings like Crippled, Spastic or Mongol. Of which for now, I as an individual will try to use not words which are offensive towards disabled people because being disabled can happen at any age, through, age, accidents and the environment that keeps changing everyday.

    • Word count: 866
  5. The principal responsibility of the National Probation Service is to protect the public from crime. Probation Officers work with some of society's most difficult, damaged and dangerous people.

    The National Probation Service is the only agency that is involved in every step of the criminal justice process - from the moment an offender appears before the court, when the Probation Officer may prepare a report to help with bail and sentencing decisions, to the end of the court order for supervision in the community, or the expiry of an ex-prisoner's period of supervision on license. This complex work involves Probation Officers using a range of techniques to enable people to address their offending behaviour effectively.

    • Word count: 950
  6. Social Issues in Sport

    The males dominate in procession of TV coverage compared to women, I think women participate nearly just as much as men nowadays in various sports and recreations but few women can use sport as a profession. It was great to watch World Cup of women's football this year and I hope this inspires more women and media interest. The use of drugs is constantly hitting the newspapers each year with athletes determined to succeed and risk their reputation and life.

    • Word count: 519
  7. what is meant by identity

    Identity is seen as an official sense of who we are, for instance having a passport will state his/her personal details of an identity. Having a passport defines your nationality which is important to understand where someone comes from and how others perception of them is if he/she, for example holds a British nationality, which in a way being British represents some sort of power which may loosen constrains other non European countries might have, so in other words passports give us a place in society in which they live in and defines what sort of people they are as in general and what they are not as opposed to being French for example.

    • Word count: 750
  8. 5 year old Child case study.

    He has good listening skills and is confident when speaking to small and large groups of children he participates well in discussions in class he has learnt his letter sounds and is using this knowledge to read and write simple words. Case B has good early number skills he recognise numbers up to 20 and is starting to order these numbers correctly he can find one more or less than a number and is beginning to use the vocabulary involved in adding and subtracting.

    • Word count: 997
  9. Issues regarding Jewish Identity in Post-Socialist Budapest

    the entire corpus of Jewish Law), "Neologue" (introducing modern elements and distancing themselves from the tradition) and "Status-Quo" (not accepting the separation). Now a 4th group has emerged, taking its organisation and principles from US examples, called Reformed Jews, but not recognised as a Jewish community in Hungary and merely functioning as an association. However, in the post-socialism, the 4 categories can only be used as a basic background to analyse the new conglomerates that surfaced in the last years in the Jewish society, because the new self-claimed identities I am confronted with, such as "I am an orthodox-non religious-believer" or "I am a Neologue-religious-atheist", need new approaches to interpretation.

    • Word count: 696
  10. Family and Kinship in East London

    or religion (8% Jewish), in fact to embody the view of the social reality of the location without to have any explicit influence on the research aims. On the other hand, the study is extensively a Qualitative primary research approach, a sample of 1,000 people from the Electoral Register (quantitative secondary research) in order to set samples of people for interviews, but it is not possible to know what type of probability sample Young and Willmott used. Young and Willmott selected a sample of 45 married couple who lived in Bethnal Green and 47 married couple in new suburban housing

    • Word count: 805
  11. The care worker needs to recognize that many of the problems that may arise are due to discrimination. Discrimination is the unequal treatment of an individual or group. It is based on prejudice towards people

    Sometimes the media plays an important part on our way of viewing things. Prejudice occurs when people has a preconceived opinion towards individuals or group of people for whatever the reason. Prejudices are often irrational and negative attitudes based on fear or lack of knowledge. As part of a society we internalize the group values and norms so, in a way, most of our prejudices are "inherited". Equal Opportunities There are three forms of equality: formal equality, equality of opportunity and equality of outcomes. Their definition is as follows: Formal Equality is a principle that views everyone in society as equal.

    • Word count: 957
  12. Discuss the Differences between Skill, Ability and Technique and explain how you would structure Practices to Enhance these Components of Fitness.

    The swimmer we talked about earlier is either able to swim fast or not. Technique is a word commonly confused with skill; in order to perform a particular skill in sport, we must learn the required technique. The swimmer may have the ability to swim fast, but they may not be using the correct technique to enhance their performance to the maximum Skill is acquired through practice. There are four different types of skill. There are cognitive skills, motor skills, perceptual skills and perceptual motor skills. Cognitive skills are skills that involve thought and process, like adding up the points in a game of darts.

    • Word count: 707
  13. What are the main aims of the article?

    In Mayo's explanation for the quota restriction from his research in a bank-wiring group at Western Electric Ltd. He inferred output limitation due to lack of understanding of the economic logics of the management by worker, also he considered the economic man a fallacious conception. (p430) In 'gravy' job, Roy found the workers only earn certain quota wages, then slow down or stop their work. Normally they don't make full effort on that. Because they knew, if they make maximum output, next the price of productions will go down, meanwhile they will get wages less than before they made numbers of productions less than that.

    • Word count: 842
  14. This essay aims to outline recent trends in changes in family or household composition. A family is defined as a group of two or more people (one of whom is the householder, the person

    Patrick (1998 p292). Giddens (1996) noted that in order to understand families it is necessary to look beyond changes in household composition to the relationships within which families live. However, we should not think of compositional changes, or changes in family living arrangements, as merely 'change in the context' of relationships. Rather such compositional changes in households, and changes in general patterns of 'standard' living arrangements, are themselves part of the substance of changing families and friendship based relationships. Marriage rates have been in steady decline since early 1970s with fall of 3 to 4% per annum.

    • Word count: 664
  15. Critically Examine The Relationship Between Education, Social Class And Social Mobility With Reference To Other Forms Of Stratification

    Roberts (2001) suggests that social mobility should be studied so that it can help establish the extent to which occupation based classes are demographic entities.2 There are two types of social mobility, the first is intragenerational mobility. This looks at social mobility within one generation. It compares a person's occupational status at two points, so if a person starts out in a low position but after ten years has a high status position, they are socially mobile in terms of intragenerational mobility.

    • Word count: 600
  16. Future Plans: A career in social work

    In 1991, I was elected the President of the Malaysian Student Association. To promote international understanding and interaction between students from Malaysia and other countries, I successfully organized the first 'Sea Games' sporting event that brought together over 300 South-East-Asian students from nearby Universities in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. After graduation, I worked in the United States and Brunei before returning to Malaysia. I speak English, Mandarin, Cantonese and Malay. My working experience with people from various geographical regions and cultural backgrounds has taught me to be respectful and tolerant, values vital to an effective team player.

    • Word count: 955
  17. Rights of the service user - early years - unit 3

    * Anti-discrimination Children have the right not to be discriminated against on the grounds of gender, racial origins, culture, social background or disabilities.

    • Word count: 230
  18. Document Analysis of The Beveridge Report The Beveridge report was a very radical change in British social policy in 1942. The fact that this policy was written in the middle of the Second World War

    The next provision of the social security reforms meant that all employees irrespective of their means would make the amount of contributions to the state in taxes. These were seen as very radical reforms at the time, but however government believed this was the only was forward in reforming social security. Other provisions of the new social security policy were, adequacy of benefit, comprehensiveness, marriage needs, divorce, and an unmarried person living as a wife.

    • Word count: 596
  19. Identify the range of needs that Lisa may require help or support with. Identify the key knowledge, skills, values and personal characteristics that a practitioner would need, in order to provide effective guidance for Lisa.

    It seems she has a poor family relationship and does not get on with her stepfather, her real father died two years ago from a drug overdose. She may possibly have lots of emotional issues from this. This could also indicate drug use in her family? Her self-esteem is possibly low and she has said that getting a job may cause more arguments at home as she will not be able to help her mum out. There is no evidence of any out of school achievement, such as sport or hobbies, this may contribute to Lisa's lack of self-esteem of feeling of worth.

    • Word count: 974
  20. Should social policy be concerned with creating equality

    Whether or not this is a possible scenario will be explored. Different theorists would be in favour or against the notion that social policy should be concerned with creating equality, for various reasons that will be elaborated later on in the essay.

    • Word count: 365
  21. Diversity creates communication problems within groups.

    We would like to suggest here that it is not diversity but the lack of communication skills that brought about the communication problems. So what then are communication skills, or what encompasses communication skills? The ability to articulate one's thoughts, to initiate conversations and the ability to organize outgoing and incoming information through listening or seeing are all part and parcel of communication skills. There are many ways to communicate. Communication by facial expressions, body language, writing and face-to-face conversations are just some of the methods.

    • Word count: 984
  22. Goals as Cornerstones of Subjective Well-being - Linking Individuals and Cultures.

    This chapter will attempt to analyze the role of culture and explore the descriptors of well-being. Psychological well-being has a few predictors that complement the self-determination model of well-being. These needs that serves as a key predictor for psychological well-being are autonomy, namely, and competence. The pursuit of personal goals such as personal growth, and enhancement of others, provides people with a deep satisfaction. Extrinsic goals such as financial success and physical attractiveness, does not provide people with that type of satisfaction. The consistency of the self-determination model of well-being along with the importance of self-acceptance and community feelings has a positive association with self-actualization and a negative association with behavioral problems.

    • Word count: 682
  23. Explore empirical evidence on children's views on family life in contemporary Britain.

    Studies such as Mayall (2002) Negotiating Childhoods as part of the ESRC 5 - 16 programme and Morrow (1998) Children's Perspectives on Families from the Joseph Rowntree Foundations have allowed children's voices to be heard. It has been identified that older children value quality of relationships in the family; younger children believe a family includes the presence of children and marriages. Most children are aware of the wide range in 'family practice and structure'. 'Love, care and mutual respect and support [are] key characteristics of family' (Morrow 1998).

    • Word count: 822
  24. How do you think de Bono's techniques can be used to: Implement and utilise innovative ideas in the provision of social welfare.

    This suggests that perception is central in the thinking process. The ways people view others leads to different ways of how people react to social problems and ways of dealing with them. This also suggests that being innovative and creative in such an environemt may be difficult since not everyone shares the same ideas. People tend to have different values and beliefs. Edward de Bono's techniques can come very useful when faced with dilemmas and dogmas. I believe that creative thinking the way Edward de Bono puts it, is required for ethical reasoning.

    • Word count: 897
  25. In general, “Diversity” refers to the dissimilarities among the manydemographic variables, including, but not limited to race, religion, colour,gender, national origin, disability, s****l orientation, age education,geographic origin and skill ch

    Communication can be by facial expressions, body language, writing or face-to-face conversations. This is significant as the modes of communications are not exclusive to any particular culture, race or age group. The rationale for the choice and its subsequent effectiveness hence are not due to the sole presence of diversity but a host of other factors. In addition, the many breakdowns in communication can be further attributed to the perception factor. This creates potential biasness regardless of whether they understood the communication put across.

    • Word count: 657

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?

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