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Using examples from the world of sport, illustrate the main principles of a sociological approach.

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Introduction

Using examples from the world of sport, illustrate the main principles of a sociological approach? Sociology is the study of human social life, groups and societies... The scope of sociology is extremely wide, ranging from the analysis of passing encounters between individuals in the street up to the investigation of world-wide social processes (Anthony Giddens "Sociology", 1989)[1]. A sociological approach is one that investigates into society to record the changes and differences at an individual level but at also the larger structural level assessing norms, values and how the social environment influences individuals. The sociological approach can be well explained through sporting examples as there is a clear link as sport reflects the society it is played in, ?Sport is all around us. Yet few of us look critically at how it affects our lives and even fewer look at how we as a society affect sport.? [2](Ronald. B. Woods, 2007) The relationship between a sociological perspective and sport in society is that way in which it intensifies and overstates contemporary issues in our society today such as gender, r****m and class. In this essay I will focus upon the how the main principles can be illustrated upon social class, its influence on sport ...read more.

Middle

The limiting factor associated with social class is money in a Marxist view and also in a Functionalist view. Money is the means which to obtain the equipment and facilities necessary to partake in the sport without money one cannot perform organised sports. The people who are being affected the most are minorities, because they lack sufficient funds for participation. This and not genetics could be the reason why black minorities are less commonly seen in expensive sports such as Polo in the and hockey, and are more commonly seen in easily accessible sports such as football and basketball in the US, where there is a basketball court at the majority of local playgrounds. This is a good reason as to perhaps why the NBA is mostly composed of black people and sports like cricket and rugby are mostly white dominated. Perhaps it has nothing to do with genetics, but what sports you have access to growing up, race and class would also influence. One study has shown that Olympic athletes and officials have higher social class backgrounds and figures show that those in the socio-economic group?s professional to intermediate/junior non manual , Bourgeoisie, are the highest consumers of sport with 56% average compared to 35.5% in the manual labour classes , Proletariat[7] (D. ...read more.

Conclusion

Referances: 1. Anthony Giddens "Sociology", 1989 - http://www.sociologyguide.com/ 2. Ronald. B. Woods, 2007, Social issues in sport, page 7 3. Stratification and Social Class lecture D. Malcolm 2010 4. Sports in Society: Issues and Controversies - Jay Coakley, 2009, page 332 5. Stratification and Social Class lecture D. Malcolm ? Veblen: The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions, 2010 6. Sports in Society: Issues and Controversies - Jay Coakley, 2009, page 329 7. Stratification and Social Class lecture D. Malcolm ? Participation rates in physical activities in the last four weeks by socio-economic group, 2010 8. Sage 1990, page 4 ________________ [1] Anthony Giddens "Sociology", 1989 - http://www.sociologyguide.com/ [2] Ronald. B. Woods, 2007, Social issues in sport, page 7 [3] Stratification and Social Class lecture D. Malcolm 2010 [4] Sports in Society: Issues and Controversies - Jay Coakley, 2009, page 332 [5] Stratification and Social Class lecture D. Malcolm ? Veblen The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions, 2010 [6] Sports in Society: Issues and Controversies - Jay Coakley, 2009, page 329 [7] Stratification and Social Class lecture D. Malcolm ? Participation rates in physical activities in the last four weeks by socio-economic group, 2010 [8] Sage 1990, page 4 ...read more.

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