Pedophiles

Perhaps no single act causes such strong emotions as the act of child sexual abuse. Child molesters can not even find refuge in prisons where rapists and murderers are commonplace. These offenders are shunned in every aspect of our society, yet there is no consensus as to the causes of this behavior. Sexual abuse of children is not new, and has not always been socially taboo. The ancient Greeks and Romans used children for sexual gratification. In Greece, it was commonplace for adolescent males to be forced into sexual relationships with mature males. This behavior was normal and not objected to by the child's parents or the Greek government. The Romans encouraged adolescent boys and girls not to protest being sold into prostitution. The Roman government even went so far as to declare a public holiday honoring young prostitutes. Sex with children in the modern era is alive and well, the power of an older person is so great that their young victims often never tell of the horrors that they have endured. There is also a pedophile enhancement movement, with confessed pedophiles insisting that their behavior is not wrong or immoral. Organizations dedicated to the social acceptance of sex with children are not new, yet have had a large upstart in membership since the early 1970's. Because of the extreme sensitivity of the subject, research in this field is quite underdeveloped.

  • Word count: 1012
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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Narcissistic Personality Disorder

The so called 'narcissistic personality disorder' is a complex and often misunderstood disorder. The cardinal feature of the narcissistic personality is the grandiose sense of self importance, but paradoxically underneath this grandiosity the narcissist suffers from a chronically fragile low self esteem. The grandiosity of the narcissist, however, is often so pervasive that we tend to dehumanize him or her. The narcissist conjures in us images of the mythological character Narcissus who could only love himself, rebuffing anyone who attempted to touch him. Nevertheless, it is the underlying sense of inferiority which is the real problem of the narcissist, the grandiosity is just a facade used to cover the deep feelings of inadequacy. The narcissist's grandiose behavior is designed to reaffirm his or her sense of adequacy. Since the narcissist is incapable of asserting his or her own sense of adequacy, the narcissist seeks to be admired by others. However, the narcissist's extremely fragile sense of self worth does not allow him or her to risk any criticism. Therefore, meaningful emotional interactions with others are avoided. By simultaneously seeking the admiration of others and keeping them at a distance the narcissist is usually able to maintain the illusion of grandiosity no matter how people respond. Thus, when people praise the narcissist his or her grandiosity will

  • Word count: 1006
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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Give an account of one clause from the Nursing and Midwifery Council (2002) Code of Professional Conduct and discuss the importance of this for your present / future practice.

Professional Development and Reflection Give an account of one clause from the Nursing and Midwifery Council (2002) Code of Professional Conduct and discuss the importance of this for your present / future practice. Clause 2 of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's (NMC) Code of Conduct states that: "As a registered nurse, midwife or health visitor, you must respect the patient or client as an individual (NMC, 2002)." This is the most fundamental aspect of nursing care and is based on the ethics of autonomy. This essay will examine the importance of the clause and elaborate on each of the sub-clauses by providing examples of how these duties can be fulfilled. The duties set out in the NMC Code of Professional Conduct are based on the ethics of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice (Edwards, 1996). They provide rules of conduct and define the nurse's responsibility to patients and to other healthcare professionals. The Code's aim is to protect the public rights whilst in the care of all Nurses, Midwives, and Health Visitor and applies to all areas of care such as in the community or in a hospital setting. Sub-clause 2.1 states that a Nurse must recognise and respect the role of patients as partners in their care. This clause is based on everyone's right of autonomy. Beauchamp and Childress (1994) defines personal autonomy as: "....personal rule of the

  • Word count: 1005
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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Reflection essay on vital signs using Driscoll's model

This assignment is a reflection that I undertook during my first clinical practice, using Driscoll’s (2000) reflective model, a recognised framework to demonstrate my ability to reflect critical thought in theory to practical skills. Reflection is defined as process of explaining and expressing from one’s own experiences and helps to enables us to develop and improve our skills and knowledge towards becoming professional practitioners (Jasper, 2003). Temperature, blood pressure, pulse rate and respiration are the vital signs that indicate the condition of someone’s ability to maintain blood flow, regulate body temperature, rate of breathing and heart-beat (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE, 2007). A small change in one vital sign can lead to detention in another vital sign. This assessment was analysed and interpreted in order to record and measure the vital signs accurately which significantly allowed practitioners to take appropriate action to meet the needs of the patient (The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), 2010). The first stage of Driscoll’s reflective mode (Johns 1994) describes what happened. The main purpose of this simulation is to increase student confidence and also to prepare student for real clinical setting.We were paired up where one took the blood pressure and the othertook the temperature, the respiration and the pulse

  • Word count: 988
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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A) Give an explanation of why people yield to minority influence.

Psychology A) Give an explanation of why people yield to minority influence. Social Cryptoamnesia. Which is a tendency, over time, to forget the source of a particular , thus making it less likely that conversation will be impeded by the association between deviant minority and a particular attitude or belief. There is a pint in any group where, after some members have started to agree with the minority, the minority then turns in to the majority. B) Describe the aims, procedures, prediction, results, conclusions and criticisms of two studies of obedience to authority. Milgram electric shock experiment 1963 Aim Stanley Milgram was from a Jewish background he was interested in how easily ordinary people could be influenced into committing atrocities for example, Germans in WWII. The aim of Milgrams study was to investigate whether ordinary people will obey a legitimate authority even when required to injure another person, i.e. obedience to unjust authority. Procedures Milgram recruited 40 male participants by advertising for volunteers to take part in a study of how punishment affects learning, to take place at Yale University. Everyone was paid $4.50 and told that they would receive this even if they quit during the study. There were two confederates: an experimenter and a learner. The participant drew lots with the confederate and always ended up as the

  • Word count: 957
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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Dealing with aggression

Dealing with aggression People who work within healthcare professions assist, support and comfort patients and family members from a wide spectrum of the general public because of this they can be exposed to conflict and aggressive behaviour. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE, 2010) states that workers within the healthcare sector can be up to four times more likely to experience work-related violence and aggression than other workers, and reports that in 2009/2010 there were 56,718 physical assaults reported from NHS organisations in England. In 1999 the Department of Health (DH 1999) launched the NHS zero tolerance zone campaign with the support of the Home Secretary, the aims of the Government campaign were: . to get over to the public that violence against staff working in the NHS is unacceptable and the Government (and the NHS) is determined to stamp it out; 2. to get over to all staff that violence and intimidation is unacceptable and is being tackled. The Department of Health (1999) defines violence and aggression as, ‘any incident where staff are abused, threatened or assaulted in circumstances relating to their work, involving explicit or implicit challenge to their safety, well-being or health’. Violence is not just limited to acts of aggression that actually result in physical harm it can include aggressive behaviour, with the use of gestures and

  • Word count: 950
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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The Role Of A Nurse As A First Assistant

South Bank University Course: Theatre Course (level-3) Session: 2002-03 Student Name : Renuka Arora Student Number : 9856030 Topic : The Role Of A Nurse As A First Assistant Tutor : Marie Culloty Submission Date : 06 January 2003 Essay - REFLECTION IN PRACTICE Definition: 'Reflection is the process of reviewing an experience of practice in order to better describe, analyze and evaluate, and so inform learning about practice.' Boud et al(1985) Many authors have utilized frameworks and models to guide reflective practice. Attached are a number of different models: Suggested Reading: Schon D (1983) The reflective practitioner, Temple Smith London; Drischoll D(1994) Reflective Practice in practice Senior Nurse 13,7, 47-50. Description of incident: I was asked to check in a patient Mrs Jones for the vascular theatre. Mrs Jones was 65 yrs old lady admitted for thyroidectomy. Mrs Jones was already waiting in the reception area. I took the patient notes from the ward nurse to confirm the patient identity and to check the pre op-check list. During this time I asked Mrs Jones that if she has any medical problems. Mrs. Jones told me that she had chest pain this morning, that's the same time when nurse told me that at the time of chest pain they have done an ECG and they were trying to get contact with the anaesthetic

  • Word count: 932
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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Highlight the importance of communication when establishing a good patient nurse relationship, the effects that communication can have on this relationship and the problems that can arise from ineffective communication.

. INTRODUCTION In this report I will try to highlight the importance of communication when establishing a good patient nurse relationship, the effects that communication can have on this relationship and the problems that can arise from ineffective communication. During this report I will attempt to include every components used in nurse patient communication i.e. verbal, non-verbal, trust and listening. I will outline a basic communication model and briefly describe its theories. This report will be based on a scenario in which a student nurse shall accompany an elderly nursing home resident to an outpatient's hospital appointment. With regard to confidentiality and in compliance to legal guidelines "all patient/client information is confidential and should be used solely for the purpose it was given." (NMC Code of Professional Conduct 2002 clause 5), the patients name has been changed. For the purpose of this scenario the patient will be called Mr Smith. Through writing this report I hope to gain the knowledge needed to establish and maintain good interpersonal relationships, whilst also learning more about the ethics and legislation behind patient care. 2. COMMUNICATION "Communication is the basic element of human interaction that allows people to establish, maintain and improve contact with others." (Heath 1995 pg 275). There are two schools of thought in

  • Word count: 930
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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Hematocrit Measurement. The specific purpose of this lab was to determine the hematocrit value of individuals with different gender, conditions, and environment.

February 20, 2009 Blood Analysis Activity-1: Hematocrit Determination Objective: Hematocrit refers to the percentage of red blood cells found in a sample of whole blood. The hematocrit value varies with gender, age, health and environmental factors. In healthy males the norm is 47%, and in healthy females the norm is 42%. The normal upper limit is 55%. A lower-than-normal hematocrit indicates anemia. A higher-than-normal hematocrit indicates polycythemia. Anemia is a condition in which the blood has abnormally low oxygen-carrying capacity, and polycythemia is an abnormal increase in red blood cells. The specific purpose of this lab was to determine the hematocrit value of individuals with different gender, conditions, and environment. Method: This experiment requires heparinized capillary tube, capillary tube sealer, microhematocrit centrifuge, metric ruler, and blood samples from six individuals who volunteered to contribute their blood for the experiment. These six individuals consists of healthy male living in Boston, healthy female living in Boston, healthy male living in Denver, healthy female living in Denver, male with aplastic anemia, and a female with iron-deficiency anemia. A heparinzed capillary tube was used and collected blood sample 1 by fluid capillary action. One end of the capillary tube containing blood sample 1 was sealed by the capillary tube

  • Word count: 907
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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Reflection In Practice

REFLECTION IN PRACTICE Definition Bond et al (1985) suggested / stated that reflection in the context of learning is a generic for those intellectual and effective activities in which individuals engage to explore their experiences in order to lead to a new understanding and experience. The author is going to use The Gibbs Reflective Cycle to help her in the process of reflection, as reflection can be a difficult experience without the guidance and support of an expert. Description of Incident I was allocated in a day-surgery unit to do an orthopaedic minor list. When I got there, I found out that that I was just me and a qualified nurse who were new to the theatre. We did not know the procedure and also where things were kept. I phoned the senior nurse and explained the situation to her. She told me to just get on with the list as there was no-one else whom she could send at that time. Few people had gone off sick that morning. I told the sister-in-charge that I was not at all happy with the situation. After that, I and a staff nurse started the list but there was a significant delay as we had problems allocating the equipment. Feelings I felt angry, disappointed, and helpless, as I felt that I was not getting enough support from the theatre manager. I was also equally shocked to see that the management did not look at the skill mix when they were carrying out the

  • Word count: 905
  • Level: University Degree
  • Subject: Subjects allied to Medicine
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