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An examination of some operational aspects of A. S. Facer (Longton) Ltd

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Introduction

An examination of some operational aspects of A. S. Facer (Longton) Ltd Executive Summary This report aims to describe the operational functions of A. S. Facer (Longton) Ltd which is a pharmacy located in the village of Longton, Preston in Lancashire. It will begin by giving an overview and description of the business which was set up over 30 years ago by Mr Alan Facer but is now run by his son, Mr Ian Facer, both of whom are qualified pharmacists. It will then move on to look at the various inputs, outputs and transformation processes that products and services have to go through before they reach the final customer. This will be both in general business terms as well as being specifically related to Facer's chemist. As the report progresses the theory of capacity management will then be described and then this will be related to this particular business organisation. The report will then draw its conclusions. 1.0 Introduction to the Company A. S. Facer (Longton) Ltd is a pharmacy situated in the centre of the village of Longton, Preston in Lancashire. Not only does Facer's offer the services you would expect from any pharmacy, it also sells various other healthcare goods. These include family toiletries, baby needs, oral hygiene, cosmetics and skincare as well as fashion accessories. The pharmacy is one of the largest in the area and as such employs four fully qualified pharmacists and has a support staff of approximately 25. ...read more.

Middle

This is the case whether the business be offering customers goods or services. In fact, "most companies offer customers a combination of both goods and services". (Lecture notes) 2.1 Inputs Inputs into any operation's process can either be described as the transformed resources or the transforming resources. "Transformed resources are the resources that are treated, transformed or converted in the process. They are usually a mixture of . . . materials, information and customers. Often one of these is dominant in an operation." (Slack, N et al, 2004). "Transforming resources are the resources which act upon the transformed resources. There are two types which form the 'building blocks' of all operations: * Facilities - the buildings, equipment, plant and process technology of the operation; * Staff - the people who operate, maintain, plan and manage the operation." (Slack, N et al, 2004) 2.2 Transformation Processes These inputs, whatever they may been are then transformed using some process. The specific process used depends greatly upon the specific input that is being transformed. There are three main types of processing. These are: 1. Materials processing. * "Operations which process materials could do so to transform their physical properties. Most manufacturing operations are like this. Other operations process their materials to change their location. Some, like retail operations, do so to change the possession of the materials. Finally some operations store materials, such as warehouses." ...read more.

Conclusion

Materials processing. * "Operations which process materials could do so to transform their physical properties. Most manufacturing operations are like this. Other operations process their materials to change their location. Some, like retail operations, do so to change the possession of the materials. Finally some operations store materials, such as warehouses." (Slack, N et al, 2004). 5. Information processing * "Operations which process information could do so to transform their informational properties...Some change the possession of the information, for example market research companies sell information. Some store the information, for example archives and libraries. Finally, some operations, such as telecommunication companies change the location of the information." (Slack, N et al, 2004). 3.3 Outputs at A. S. Facer (Longton) Ltd Capacity Management Examples of capacity management decisions are "What physical capacity should each part of the network owned by the company have at any point in time? How large should the homeware factory be? If it expands, should it do so in large capacity steps or small ones? Should it make sure that it always has more capacity than anticipated demand or less?" (Slack, N et al, 2004). Stock Control at Facer's As with any other business it is extremely important to Facer's to ensure that supply of the products and services that the company has can meet demand. However, this is sometimes not the case, especially where prescription items and specific medicines are concerned. There is not the storage room available to keep every single medicine that is available; therefore good links with suppliers have been created. ...read more.

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