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Lessons Learned From The Illiad

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Introduction

´╗┐Dominic Romano Professor Detzler Reflection Paper 3 9/19/12 Lessons Learned From The Illiad The story of Iliad has been one of the most famous and admired ancient Greek epic poems by Homer. The story is intended to teach a moral lesson to its readers. I believe the main theme of this story is about the price one must pay for their arrogance. The self-respect and integrity that Agamemnon and Achilles struggled to keep has resulted in a brutal war between the Achaeans and the Trojans. Agamemnon?s first fault is pride, and it is shown in the first book of the Iliad. He refused to return Chryseis to her father, even though many of his troops had been killed by a plague from Apollo. ...read more.

Middle

He then asks Zeus to bring distress to Agamemnon and the Achaean people. This small occurrence becomes the primary cause of elongated battles between the Achaeans and the Trojans throughout the story. Zeus proceeded by summoning evil Dream to Agamemnon, and told him that he would grant the Achaeans a win against the Trojans. Agamemnon believed that it was a symbol to attack Troy. The gods were very involved in this war commotion. Some gods favored and agreed with the Trojans, and others favored and agreed with the Achaeans. Agamemnon was foolish, and not aware that the war is a by his pride. War after war took place. Many troops died in the battle ground. ...read more.

Conclusion

They were not able to convinced Achilles. He still felt the great pain of humiliation that Agamemnon has caused. Achilles refused to return. The ending of this story is important to understand also. After Achilles killed Hector, he took Hector?s body along with him. Priam, the king of Troy, came to ask for the body of his son from Hector and provided a ransom. Achilles respected Priam and accepted his gifts. He gave the body of Hector back to his father with honor. They finally ate together in peace, even though Priam was in a great grief because of the loss of his son. The message of this epic poem can be seen quite clearly. Homer wants to remind his reader to not be self-centered and arrogant. One?s arrogance will cause a lot of problems in his/her life and the lives of other people. ...read more.

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