• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Odyssey.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Odyssey Entry #23 (Epic Hero, 2 entries) 11/24/03 Homer's epic poem, The Odyssey, is the story of Odysseus' extensive journey home from the Trojan War and the tribulations he confronts upon his return. The journey itself is quite the adventure. Odysseus and his men come in contact with many obstacles that they must overcome, and there are more hurdles to jump when Odysseus reaches his destination. Odysseus is an epic hero who, besides showing superhuman characteristics in strength, bravery and cleverness, also proves himself through his emotions, leadership, and the corrections of his faults. Odysseus' emotions are rare, yet profound enough to enhance the way that he is viewed as an epic hero. The first sign of Odysseus' true emotions occur once Odysseus chooses to take the path through the Scylla, a six-headed monster who devours sailors in passing ships, rather than the one through Charybdis, a ship-swallowing whirlpool. ...read more.

Middle

Odysseus takes on the role of an intelligent leader in The Odyssey. Odysseus is "never at a loss," and he always seems to know exactly what to do. Odysseus' intuitiveness aids in several unfortunate experiences during his voyages. On one particular occasion, Odysseus and his men are trapped in the Cyclops' cave by a slab of solid rock, and the blinded Polyphemos refuses to let the men leave. Odysseus is quick to come up with a solution to the problem. Each of Odysseus' men hide beneath three of the Cyclops' rams while Odysseus clings to the underside of the biggest ewe. When the Cyclops takes away the stone to let his sheep outside, Odysseus and his men are able to escape. Soon after, Odysseus and his crew must choose between passing the terrifying monster Scylla, who will consumes six occupants of his ship, or the whirlpool Charybdis who will consume the entire ship and crew. ...read more.

Conclusion

This act of haughtiness provokes the Cyclops to throw massive boulders into the sea, interrupting Odysseus' escape. Odysseus and his men successfully escape despite Odysseus' conceit. By the end of this epic poem, Odysseus has learned to keep his arrogance to himself. This change in character becomes apparent when Antinoos, the most outspoken of Penelope's suitors, throws a chair at Odysseus who is disguised as a beggar. Since the chair thrown at Odysseus was Odysseus' chair, the food asked for by Odysseus was Odysseus' food, and the woman Antinoos is competing for was Odysseus' wife, there were several things Odysseus could have told Antinoos that would be interpreted as arrogance. However, Odysseus remained calm because he knew that Antinoos would soon be paid back for all his wrongful doings. Odysseus was truly the epic hero in Homer's The Odyssey. The ability to show and control emotion, the ability to lead his crew through difficult situations, and the ability to recognize and correct his faults are each characteristics of an epic hero. (803) ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Classics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Classics essays

  1. Was Julius Caesar an effective leader?

    Caesar's actions created resentment among the remaining senators. The few who remained refused to meet him and he failed to force them to do so, even the moderates; As long as he carried a populist agenda his clemency towards the optimates could only work against him.18 When he demanded the release of emergency funds from the state treasury he was vetoed.

  2. How important is Odysseus disguise as a beggar to the success of The Odyssey?

    Furthermore his disguise adds an element of surprise due to the delay caused by putting off his exposal as Odysseus. With the possible recognition from other characters, the tension is increased and the reader is left waiting for the instance when his disguise will not prove good enough.

  1. How important is the episode in Phaeacia compared to the rest of the poem? ...

    The Phaeacian section of the poem shows huge importance, particularly because it is here that we learn about Odysseus' adventures since leaving his home. During book 8, the famous bard Demodocus sings a song, "When they had satisfied their appetite and thirst, the Muse set the bard to sing the famous deeds of the heroes."

  2. What impression is given of Aeneas as a man and as a leader in ...

    Although Aeneas has his moment of self-pity during the storm, he does show good leadership qualities when dealing with his men afterwards. As a result, Virgil creates a new and different hero by combining human frailty with human strength. As a Trojan leader, Aeneas respects prophecy and attempts to incorporate

  1. The Odyssey' places emphasis on cunning and guilefulness rather than strength as in the ...

    Reinforcing the fundamental theme of the passage, the language and rise in tension play important roles. Abundant with energetic verbs together with the vivid imagery, Homer's diction undoubtedly creates a powerful text as seen in sentences such as: "forward they sprinted, lifted it, and rammed it / deep in his crater eye" (415-416).

  2. The narrative epic, 'The Odyssey' composed by Homer between 750 and 650 BC recounts ...

    / and go abroad for news of you lost father-" (Lines 323-326) By using a disguise as an old family friend, Mentor, Athena is cleverly deceiving the suitors into believing that no deity is assisting Odysseus kin during a time of turmoil for his family.

  1. What qualities does Odysseus show in the episodes he relates in Books 9-12? Does ...

    The beasts in the Odyssey are usually fantastic and extraordinary who can't realistically be fought with a sword (e.g. Scylla, Laestrygonians). The dangers usually need the application of 'metis' (cunning) not 'bié' (brute force). Odysseus can be praised for his flexibility in this sense.

  2. Whom do you admire more as a leader – Odysseus in the Odyssey or ...

    She is very intimate with Odysseus, conversing at length and speaking very openly ("you are so persuasive, so quick-witted, so self-possessed" O.13.333). Whilst Venus never alights on the earth to console Aeneas in his grief ("heart sick at the sadness of war" A.8.29), Athene can not bear to leave her

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work