• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Alfred Hitchcock create anxiety in the shower scene from Psycho

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Psycho Alfred Hitchcock creates anxiety in the shower scene from "Psycho" by using non-diegetic music to build tension and using Mise en scene to give the maximum effect. Fear or anxiety is the feeling of discomfort, the feeling of not knowing what's going to happen or even the feeling of insecurity. Many people enjoy that feeling and go to the cinema to get it. They go for the pure thrill factor that the horror films provide. One of the most famous directors for causing anxiety is Alfred Hitchcock. Hitchcock was born in London on the 13th August 1899 to a William and Emma Hitchcock. At 16 Hitchcock studied engineering and navigation at the university of London and got his first taste of film at paramount studios as a title designer for films, this is where he met his wife Alma Reville who he married in December 1926. Alfred Hitchcock then worked his way up the movie food chain and went on to direct such masterpieces as "Psycho" and "Vertigo". Unfortunately Alfred Hitchcock died on the 29th of April 1980 aged 80 years old. The story of "Psycho" is an extremely interesting and different one. Marian steals $40,000 from her boss and runs away to be with her boyfriend Sam. ...read more.

Middle

Herrmann created some of the scariest music ever written, the theme tune from "Psycho" is contrapuntal music and it is a repetitive resounding tune. The sounds used in the shower scene are much more complex than what it first seems. The music in our extract is aggressive, screechy, tough harsh and creates a lot of different sounds using such a small variety of instruments. This builds tension and gives the "real hide behind your hands feeling". The noises in the shower scene, especially the water in the shower becomes a very uncomfortable sound even though its only water, it builds the feeling of not knowing and makes an audience very uneasy. The repetitive sound stays in an audience's head particularly when everything is silent when she is lying dead on the bathroom floor. Silence is used in two different ways in the shower scene; the first time is when Marian gets in the shower. She is happy and feels care free after deciding to go back and return the money. Hitchcock shows this with only body language and facial expressions, this silence is pleasant and happy. The second time in the scene where Hitchcock uses silence is when Norman Bates has just run into the bathroom to find Marian dead on the bathroom floor, this silence is tense and edgy. ...read more.

Conclusion

Editing can make or break a horror movie, it made "Psycho". Editing can make an audience feel calm and relaxed by using slow editing or make an audience feel uneasy using fast or frantic editing. Editing in the whole film is extremely effective, it builds tension and anxiety by using fast paced editing during the attack scenes and slow paced editing before and afterwards, Hitchcock these editing techniques before to build suspense and after the attack to give the audience some time to contemplate over what has just happened. Hitchcock uses montage editing in the shower scene to keep the audience focused on the screen and kept in complete suspense. It does this by putting brief shots together and creating an emotional impact. The editing is always parallel to what is happening, in the frantic attack they use frantic editing. Editing is used in the shower scene to build anxiety by printing key moments in an audience members head using fast paced editing; he builds suspense and time to reflect with slower paced editing. Alfred Hitchcock creates anxiety in the shower scene using mise en scene, cinematography, sound and editing I think Hitchcock created a fantastic film. "Psycho" combines tension, anxiety and a fantastic storyline using a variety of techniques to create maximum effect. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Plays essays

  1. How does Alfred Hitchcock gain the sympathy of the audience for Marian Crane in ...

    This shows the two conflicting sides of the film (good verses evil!) During the credits, the 'Psycho' theme tune is played. This helps to create tension and suspense even before the film has started. The opening scene begins with a camera panning round the skyline of Phoenix, Arizona without focusing on anything in particular.

  2. "In 'Psycho' how has Alfred Hitchcock created tension throughout the film and what effect ...

    This is where the transformation from mother to Norman occurs, for example when Marion first arrives at the Motel she sees mother in the window, but moments later, Norman comes down the pathway. The pathway could be likened to an umbilical cord, as the womb is where mother and child

  1. Discuss the ways in which Hitchcock creates atmosphere, tension and fear in two key ...

    mother would want, so he wore her clothes and a wig whilst committing his homicides. Over time, the Norman part of his brain had been overcome by the 'mother' part until there was no Norman left, only 'mother'. These were very taboo issues in the time of "Psycho".

  2. 'Spiderman' and 'Ivy the Terrible'

    There is a need for a much more sophisticated reading of conventions and familiarity with the form to follow the frame transitions and pick up the necessary visual and narrative signifiers. The characters still follow some conventions, the man shown in the second, third and fourth frame is clearly the

  1. In a 1963 interview, following the phenomenal success of "Psycho" Hitchcock agreed with his ...

    When going back to the shot of the road, the windscreen wipers in Marion's direct view seem to be in time with the thudding music; back and forth they go contributing to the speed of the car and the adrenaline going inside Marion.

  2. In what ways is "Psycho" (Alfred Hitchcock) a film for the modern audience? ...

    The reality of schizophrenia would have shocked, but it might have also fascinated the audience of the time, whilst the subject of necrophilia would have just disgusted them very much like it still very much does today. The effect of a mental illness would certainly have frightened and would have left the audience slightly dumbfounded.

  1. Analyse the ways that the director builds suspense and scares the audience in "JAWS"

    Throughout the film not a lot is given away about the shark. For the first 3 attacks the audience is not shown the shark. The audience sees the fins on the third attack. This makes the audience fear what the shark actually looks like.

  2. Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho

    while driving on an ominous and seemingly endless road toward the Bates Motel. Marion wrestles with the voices of those that her crime and disappearance has affected while the audience is compelled to recognize as to why it can so easily identify with Marion despite her wrongful actions.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work