• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analyse Roths writing in pages 127-130 The fate of Alvin is one of the fundamental strands of the novel which are entwined at its conclusion, showing how the people around Philip (and Philip himself) have been affected by the Lindbergh administration.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

ANALYSE ROTH'S WRITING IN PAGES 127-130 The fate of Alvin is one of the fundamental strands of the novel which are entwined at its conclusion, showing how the people around Philip (and Philip himself) have been affected by the Lindbergh administration, by the hypothetical synonymy of American patriotism and fascism. Throughout the novel, Roth balances political upheaval with personal turmoil, contrasting a formal retrospection imbued with political and psychoanalytical awareness against the simple anxiety of a child trying to piece together a sense of circumstance from an increasingly dysfunctional family. In the given passage, the balance is heavily on the side of the child's fear at personal events, but still manages to convey the wider sentiments central to Roth's conjecture being fully realised. The sense of "perpetual fear", of uncertainty and anxiety, is prevalent throughout the novel, burgeoning and retreating with Philip's own awareness of danger or change. Prior to the given passage, Philip expresses his uncertainty in how he should react to Alvin's arrival, asking his mother what to do. ...read more.

Middle

his family is also representative of this estrangement, as the solar system of the family, which was once in such close orbit, is now spiralling uncontrollably outwards. The reasons for this spiralling have been comprehensively described through previous narration, and the reader is fully aware that the central reason is Lindbergh's ascension to power. This small detail, then, confirms the effect on the family of the Lindbergh administration, the driving issue of the novel. The breakdown of the firm hierarchy of Philip's family continues hereafter: the once firm and confident parents crumble, with Philip's mother "crying" and his father quickly taking Philip's hand "either to prevent (Philip) from going to pieces or to protect himself from his own chaos of feelings". Even if Herman really took his son's hand with the former motivation, Philip's mere perception of the possibility of the latter is enough to accept the splintering authority of his parents. This breakdown is critical to the development of the novel, as it shows the disintegration of everything which allows Philip to feel safe. ...read more.

Conclusion

Unlike McEwan's comparatively mechanical development of zeitgeist (in that Perowne's abstractions often feel like distant meanderings with little importance in terms of plot, and McEwan's use of specific detail sometimes too though out, verging on the contrived), Roth forms a sense of context with much greater fluency, forming a symbiotic relationship between detailed description of familial strain and political angst. The technique of split narration is also employed by both writers: McEwan employs it with a sense of arrogance, it is almost auxiliary, surplus to requirements; Roth's use of split narration seems entirely necessary in both presenting and judging the events described, and Roth executes this advanced tool in a simplistic and authentic way, with authenticity being the acid test for the success of the novel. Roth firmly plants the destination of the novel in the head of the reader predominantly through the plot; he does not rely on the crutches of farfetched mental wanderings as McEwan does. And when these mental wanderings do come about (as in the case of Little Robert), they add to the feelings which Roth is trying to convey in a succinct yet flowing manner. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Authors section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Authors essays

  1. "This (novel) is a failure, and had to be, since it was written by ...

    [A3] Slaughterhouse Five is known to be an anti-war novel as Vonnegut name the book "The Children's Crusade"[A4], after a discussion with O'Hare's wife, Mary. The novel being published in 1969 during the Vietnam War, caused controversy as the novel challenged the idea of militarism and war as well as the entire idea of destruction caused by man made machineries.

  2. Explore the different forms of haunting in Toni Morrisons Beloved.

    The picture of the men coming to nurse her was as lifeless as the nerves in her back where the skin buckled like a washboard. Nor was there the faintest scent of ink". The image is unexpected and bombards the reader; they've been reading about nature when suddenly the image of a disfigured back comes into their mind.

  1. How do the writers Sylvia Plath and Ken Kesey portray the struggle of the ...

    him, thus creating narrative tension which impels us to discover this story. Kesey uses colloquial language to suggest that due to Bromden's inability to express his feelings, his thoughts are often unstructured and questionable, which can be seen when he states; "But, please.

  2. The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. In this essay, I will be ...

    By using this method, we are constantly exposed to and reminded of the siblings' youth. Roy has chosen to use this method for the novel so that we can empathise with the twins' positions and see their perspective on the ongoing situations which they've had to deal with at such a young age.

  1. In A Passage to India the Marabar Hills and Caves possess a powerful symbolic ...

    Gertrude M. White said of the visit to the caves by the women, "It imperils all relations between English and Indians; and it destroys all constructive relationships between individuals."2 This suggests that the echo heard by Mrs. Moore and Adela's supposed hallucination have a far wider reach than just these two characters.

  2. How typical are the pages 234-237 of Bret Easton Ellis portrayal of Patrick Bateman ...

    ?I slam the door and start shovelling the coke from the envelope into my nose? the comparison shows that the violence is like a drug to Patrick, the urgency, is his need for ?a fix?. Patrick uses violence, to overpower his victims, to feel superior.

  1. Self-Delusion and Blindness in O'Connor's "Good Country People"

    to acknowledge the reality of their true selves and their significance in the world they live in.

  2. Notes on "All Quiet on the Western Front"

    When Kantorek asks Paul to give a word to the class about how they should go and fight for the ?Fatherland?, Paul simply answers that he ?can?t say anything?. In the 1930 classic film (a faithful adaptation of the book), the most poignant and upsetting moment is when Paul makes

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work