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Analysis of Hamlet's first Soliloquy

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´╗┐Hamlet?s first soliloquy provides a striking contrast between the controlled, composed manner that he has around his mother, Gertrude, and uncle, Claudius, and his passionate melancholy which he expresses when he is alone. In this soliloquy, he is able to pour out his innermost feelings of hatred, anger, grief and pain. His words are full of disgust and dissatisfaction, that he refers to Denmark as ?an unweeded garden? (I,ii,135) and then describes it as being ?rank? and ?gross? (I,ii,136). It may be possible that due to his father?s death, it had affected the whole country and now the beauty and appeal have been extracted from the country. ...read more.


This then further exaggerates his desire for death. The nature of his grief is soon revealed to the audience. Although the death of his father has left him feeling depressed and sad, it is in fact that his mother, Gertrude, had married his Uncle at an ?oh most wicked speed? (I,ii,156). The memory of his mother and father?s relationship is almost too painful for him to bear, knowing that his mother is marrying Claudius. However, he goes on to explain how perfect their match was. ...read more.


He describes his uncle as ?no more like my father / Than I to Hercules? (I,ii,152-153). In those lines, he also compares himself to Hercules and it is evident that Hamlet does not think much of himself; he certainly does not think that he comes close to being anything like Hercules. Throughout this passage, Shakespeare cleverly uses language to create an initial impression of how Hamlet views the situation in Denmark and gives the audience a brief introduction to the philosophical debate on life and death that will be an ongoing theme in the play. It creates a rather pensive and intense atmosphere that will continue to develop as the play matures. ...read more.

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