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Compare and contrast Hardy's 'The convergence of the Twain' and Kipling's 'Harp song of the Dane women.' Exploring portrayal of loss.

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Introduction

Compare and contrast Hardy's 'The convergence of the Twain' and Kipling's 'Harp song of the Dane women.' Exploring portrayal of loss. The sadness of loss, and of what man has felt after something or someone is lost has been the subject of sadness and melancholy in many poems for many years. The two poems, "The convergence of the Twain' by Thomas Hardy and 'Harp song of the Dane women' by Rudyard Kipling both explore portrayal of loss but each in a very different ways. Although they do both seem similar in content and style, the way that the poem reflects on each of he poet's emotions are very different. The poem 'The convergence of the Twain' talks about the sinking of he Titanic. The first line starts with, "In a solitude sea Deep from human vanity," this sets the mood of the entire poem as quite cold and empty. The word 'deep' is used with 'from'; this makes us feel distance towards the ship. ...read more.

Middle

That is only a weak sound so it is quite effective as it reflects with the ship lying very still and cold at the bottom of the sea. The "Harp song of the Dane women" is very different. It is talking about the persona of a Viking woman. It is written as if it is a song and that she is complaining that as soon as the spring comes, all their husbands will go and see their boats and travel off to sea. I noticed that both of the poems are exploring loss due to the sea and that it is like a snatcher of things that are precious to humans. Kipling personifies the sea in the whole poem; he starts this in the first verse by saying, "What is a woman that you forsake her and the hearth-fire and the home acre, To go with the old grey Widow-maker?" This starts the poem with a sense of rivalry against the Viking women and the sea. ...read more.

Conclusion

The first line of this verse starts with the sense of loss and irony; it talks about pyres. Pyres are associated with cremation and in funerals, his gives us a sense of loss as it is like the ship has died. This personifies the ship and gives us a sign of irony towards the ship dying or sinking because of the unsinkable factor, which I mentioned before. The atmosphere of the poem stays cold, but here is a good contrast that is made between cold and hot twice in this verse. The second line mentions 'salamandrine fires.' This contrasts with the third line, which starts with 'Cold currents.' This contrast is very effective as it shows that the ship was ho first like it was alive and now it is cold because it is dead. After this contrast, the last part of the verse talks about 'rhythmic tidal lyres.' A lyre is an old instrument and by using it alongside the word 'tidal' we can almost sense the movement of the waves, like the waves are being played like instruments by the sea to sound like 'rhythmic tidal lyres.' ...read more.

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