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Emma's situation in chapter 14

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Introduction

Emma's situation in chapter 14 In chapter 14 Emma's situation changes, first of all she thinks that Mr Elton cares for Harriet but learns to realise that he may actually have feelings for her. Emma seems alarmed by this and she tries to avoid him at the dinner party at Randalls. "Emma's project of forgetting Mr Elton for a while made her rather sorry to find, when they had all taken their places that he was close to her" Emma had been warned by Mr John Knightley but at first she doesn't want to know, it is only when she starts to think about the way in which he had been acting that she realises that it could be true. Emma is developing as a character as she is honestly admitting to herself that she could actually be wrong about Mr Elton. Austen presents this to the reader with a sense of irony and wit, the reader would have realised that Mr Elton didn't care for Harriet in the slightest and we get to learn a little bit more about Mr Elton and what he really wants. ...read more.

Middle

In this section Austen gives the reader the impression that marriage is a superficial affair, perhaps not just for Emma but for a number of women in her time. Austen "shocks" the reader in a way with what Emma is saying. Emma doesn't need to marry but is considering marrying someone she doesn't even know. Austen shows the reader that Emma is prepared to give up her situation at present just because she has heard of a man who is of the "suitable age" e.t.c. "And though not meaning to be induced by him, or by anybody else , to give up a situation which she believed more replete with good than any she could change it for". Austen gives the reader the impression that most of the time Emma is very much in control but here we can see that she still is very na�ve and she doesn't think things through properly,she thinks she knows what is best for everyone including herself, but she cant see that what she needs in right in front of her. ...read more.

Conclusion

you have been no friend to Harriet Smith" Emma is now realising that she has been wrong and should have listened to the people who cared about her . In this chapter, Emma realises that it is Mr Knightley that she loves and wants him to marry her. " It darted through her , with the speed of an arrow, that Mr Knightley must marry no one but herself!" Austen as the narrator is trying to make the reader think on her level, we know that Emma and Mr Knightley were meant to be but again Emma is blind to the truth. Austen uses direct and indirect conversation according to how much she wanted the reader to be involved.Therefore she wants the reader to think on the same level as her and to see things from an outside prospective. We see what she sees as being the narrator. If we knew Emma we would probably be giving her the same advice as Mr Knightley has been giving her and I think that that is Mr Knightleys' purpose as a character, to form a link and a similarity with the reader. ...read more.

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