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Give a detailed consideration of poems from World War 1, looking at poems by Wilfred Owen, Jessie Pope, Rupert Brooke and Siegfried Sassoon.

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Introduction

GCSE English Coursework World War 1 Poetry For this assignment I am going to give a detailed consideration of poems from World War 1. I will be looking at poems by Wilfred Owen, Jessie Pope, Rupert Brooke and Siegfried Sassoon. I intend to study the language, imagery and poetic techniques of the poems. I am going to begin with some of the earlier war poetry. These poems were written to encourage young men to join the army. They are patriotic, jingoistic and unrealistic. These were written by poets who had not yet experienced or seen the awfulness of war. I will begin with "Who's for game?" by Jessie Pope. This poem is full of questions which make it interact well with the reader. The poem starts off with "Who's for game, the biggest that's played,". This, just like the title, is an ego teaser. This means that the reader connects well with the poem and would be more encouraged to join the army because of it. It also compares war to a game. Throughout the poem the poet uses a comparison of a man joining the army and a man choosing not to. ...read more.

Middle

The poem begins with: "He sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark," "He" is the soldier and could be waiting for dark for a number of reasons. He may not want to be seen by anyone, the dark would hide his mutilated body and people wouldn't be able to judge him with a glance. He may be waiting for sleep, where he can no longer remember the war or the pain he is in, or, maybe he is bored and is waiting for the day to end. He can hear boys playing in the park having fun like her used to. The would be making him remember his past times as a boy, but, at the same time mocking him as he will never have that again. Before he joined the army he enjoyed drinking, having fun with his friends and relationships with women. He joined the army after a football game when he'd had a drink. Before the war, girls used to treat him with respect and as a potential partner, now they look at him in disgust: "All of them touch him like some queer disease" and pity. ...read more.

Conclusion

Ultimately the poem is stressing how easily those who have not fought in the war forget about the psychological damage that war can cause, which, at the time was known as "Shell Shock". The poem starts with: "Does it matter? - losing your legs? . . ." Here Sassoon uses extreme sarcasm and irony to bring his point across. There is also alliteration "Losing your Legs" In the first line of each verse the injury gets worse. In verse 2: "Does it matter? - loosing your sight? . . . In verse 3: "Do they matter? - those dreams from the pit? . . . Sassoon believes this to be the worst injury from war, going insane. In this poem Sassoon shows how he detests people who are patriotic and jingoistic towards the war. He understands from first hand experience how war can affect an individual and he is trying to help other people understand that. I think Sassoon wrote this poem because of the uncaring society that did not consider the personal effects of war on an individual soldier. The older war poetry was about thinking of our country, which encourage patriotism and people signing up for the army. Sassoon's poems consider individuals and shows what life is like for them. Peter Gilani Page 1 5/7/2007 ...read more.

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