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In this essay I am going to examine the two poems by Wilfred Owen and Alfred Lord Tennyson, Dulce et Decorum Est and The Charge of the Light Brigade.

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Introduction

In this essay I am going to examine the two poems by Wilfred Owen and Alfred Lord Tennyson, Dulce et Decorum Est and The Charge of the Light Brigade. I will do so by comparing, contrasting, and explaining what the two poets are trying to say. Looking at the similarities and differences in each poem because both of these poets have different views on war. Firstly Dulce et Decorum Est was written by Wilfred Owen in 1917 during the first World War and he actually experienced the war so these are his real feelings and all of these things happened to him! The poem is quite dramatic and this is his personal response to tell us how he feels. Most of his poems are written about the war because this was his life he lived and died in the war. Where as Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote his poem from as newspaper article, so he didn't actually experience a war. His poem was written from information, not from feelings and thoughts like Wilfred Owen! The language used is first person because he was there experiencing the war where as in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem it is third person. ...read more.

Middle

Alfred Lord Tennyson and Wilfred Owen use repetition, especially Alfred Lord Tennyson in The Charge of the Light Brigade. An example is "rode the six hundred" In the first stanza of Dulce et Decorum est the soldiers are retreating from the front line and all of them are exhausted and have been badly affected by their experiences of war. A line from this stanza is "men marched asleep". Which describes how tried the men where. In the second stanza the soldiers are being attacked by a mustard gas and are all struggling to put their gas masks on. All they can see is a fog of green and in this verse he describes the cruel death of a soldier when he is literally drowning on his own blood. In this verse he describes someone drowning in the thick gas, and he cant believe what he is seeing and with only two lines he is emphasises his personal reaction to these circumstances. Then he carries it on in the fourth verse describing how a person is reacting to mustard gas for example "white eyes writhing in his face". Moving on to the Charge of the Light Brigade, this was written by Alfred Lord Tennyson about an event at the battle of Balaclava in ...read more.

Conclusion

Alliteration is used in verse five where it says "storm'd at with shot and shell" The poet also uses certain words carefully to put his views forward, he calls every man a "hero". For their bravery and willingness to fight for their country. "When can their glory fade? Honour the charge they made". This is like his final point of view to say that dieing for your country in a war is a good way to die and that everyone should be honoured. He says this because he admires every single soldier that fought in the battle. There are main sentences that give the poem danger and destruction like: Into the jaws of death, shattered and sundered, into the mouth of hell, stormed at with shot and shell and into the valley of death. These make the poem sound destructive and give it some depth. I think he breaks up the poem like this because this is then telling you the stage at which the battle is in. I prefer Dulce et Decorum est out of the two poems because it is more descriptive and more enjoyable to read. It also gives a truer picture of war than the Charge of the Light Brigade. ...read more.

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