• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

John Donne - Batter my Heart

Extracts from this document...


Batter My heart If some of poems in the Anthology were to be changed, which poem would you most like the keep in the selection? Justify you choice of poem, using literary and linguistic concepts and approaches. If I were to choose a poem to remain the selection I would choose Sonnet: 'Batter My Heart' by John Donne. The reason I would choose the poem is because of the remarkable emotion portrayed and the strong, powerful imagery used. 'Batter my heart' is a religious poem, ultimately addressing god himself. It is a plea to god from the perspective of a sinner as he desperately tries to establish faith through argument. Trying to convince himself as much as god. The theme of desperation grows from anger to a apologetic tone. ...read more.


Verbs are used consistently in the first four lines, creating a fast paced start. The poem features a number of complex sentences such as " I, Like an usuprt towne, to another due". This adds a sense of intellect and thought giving a structure to the argument and thus appearing well though out. A lexis of war is evident with words such as " Knocke, force, breake, defend, enemie". This relates to the situation Donne is experiencing with God to war, it is a struggle of a man that is deeply troubled and is fighting a battle; possibly referring to his own sins. The repetition of monosyllabic words can be seen, " Knocke" , " Breathe" , "Shine". Once again creating a fast flowing read intensifying the situation and drama. ...read more.


The poem uses alliteration, for example " Break, Blow, Burne". Takes the initial 'B" sound from "Batter my heart". Repeating it in lines two and four. Adding the repetition gives a harsher sound, creating a darker aura and furthering the theme. The last line could be perceived as inappropriate or untasteful. " Nor even chaste, except you ravish mee". The image of rape in the final line is a exceptionally strong conclusion. It is a remarkable comparison of Donne's relationship with God. And shows the reader perfectly the mental state of which Donne is in. He has sinned to a point and created so many barriers in the way of his faith that only God can save him now, and must act. The reason I chose to keep this selection is for Donne's use of logical argument while visiting the extremes of emotional boundaries, creating a haunting struggle, through imagery and violent language of a very troubled man. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Poets section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Poets essays

  1. In the poem, 'To His Mistress Going to Bed,' John Donne, in the form ...

    This introduces the thought that the woman has an equal amount of sexual desire as the man. The imagery takes a fluid transition into nature imagery when it begins to talk about "beauty" and "flowery meads." This continues the flowing, harmonious mood, even though the poem is centered around impatient sexual yearnings.

  2. The country pleasures which John Donne mentioned in The Good Morrow is an example ...

    It is the desire to attain an everlasting life. There is the realisation of lost innocence which the poet talks about in the imagery of a "usurped town" which has been "ravished". In sonnet 7 Donne realises his need for repentance.

  1. Referring to either The Flea and/or The Broken Heart do you think that it ...

    This could illustrate that Donne's metaphor is nothing other than a desire to startle. Similarly in "The Broken Heart" Donne uses metaphors for love such as such as 'the plague' and a 'flask of powder'. He is describing how love is rapidly destructive.

  2. Epic convention - Rape of the Lock

    and in fact the Sylphs were the one who carried out these "labours". However, these were no labours at all. Pope is merely mocking Belinda and even the Sylphs again - for they involve themselves with trivial matters - by satirising high class society in which preparing your appearance would

  1. Types of Love in Donne's Poetry

    And thou shalt hear, all here in one bed lay' Their love is greater and more precious than kings - a much more powerful image in Donne's era, due to the strong belief of the divine right of kings, and that kings were ordained by God.

  2. How effective do you find Donne`s use of imagery and language in conveying the ...

    If Donne is using light as a symbol for Anne then he shows the power of his emotion in the final stanza by making her the source of all light, 'nor will my sun renew,' and elevating her in status above the real sun, 'for whose sake the lesser sun.'

  1. By what means and how effectively does the poem present the monologist?

    He is obviously shocked that the Duchess sees his 'nine hundred year old name' to be of little value, equal to that of gifts she received from others, and feels that she undervalued him. This portrays the Duchess to be far less materialistic than the Duke, although this may be due to her young age.

  2. 'Explore the Nature of Love in The Extasie': John Donne Poetry Analysis

    Furthermore, the mingling of their souls which follows on from the extasie, has a purifying effect, 'unperplex(ing)' them, and resulting in him 'part(ing) farre purer than he came' - Donne realises in this poem, that intellectual and emotional intimacy that he experiences transcends bodily love, and that 'it was not sexe', but rather something beyond the physical world.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work