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Lord Tennyson’s“The charge of Light brigade ” and Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est”.

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Introduction

The comparison of poems I am going to look at Lord Tennyson's"The charge of Light brigade " and Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est". Tennyson wrote this poem during the Crimean war, which was in 1854. He wrote it because he was the Poet Laureate at that time, he needed to write the poem because the government told him to do so to act as propaganda and the turn what was a disaster into a success. He needed to tell how well the English troops had fought even they were slaughtered, and how glorious they were when they were trying to get the English cannons back. Wilfred Owen was a war poet in the 1st world war. He had stayed in trenches for some time and all of his poems are about the actions in 1st world war. In both poem, they are set out in 3 sections. In Tennyson's , he is saying the army goes into the valley where the enemy are. Then it is some close battle of sword fighting, at last it is the troops retreating. ...read more.

Middle

You can see a rhythm in the poem like at the start "Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward". He is building up a rhythm like the tradition poems. If you look at the words he use, he is describing the battle differently. "Flash'd all their sabres bare," this is not like normal battle, their sabres are flashing, this is a strange description but very graphical, as if the soldiers are only doing sword fighting in a stadium. In Owen's poem, he starts off by saying the English soldiers are walking like beggars back to their base. It is totally different to what Tennyson says how glorious the English soldiers are at the end of his poem. Then Owen has this sudden gas attack: "Gas!GAS!Quick, boys!-an ecstasy of fumbling," Putting the second word gas twice and in capital, gives you a feeling that this is important of what is happening. And he also describes that the reaction of the soldiers just wakes up, like when you hear a gunfire, all of a sudden you will become very aware of what is happening, do the best thing to protect yourself. ...read more.

Conclusion

The mouth is like hell, and how lucky is it to get out of there. He is telling us that war is not really good, there is also a bad side of it. And in Owen's poem: "And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin" How strongly he is saying of his sin, that even the devil will be sick of it. The devil is supposed to make sins or encourage other people to sin, but he is saying that this scene in the battle will even make the devil sick. How the man is watching you, his white eyes, even he can't see, he is looking at your direction like asking why don't you help him. At the end of this poem, he mentions about the old lie,"Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori" which means that it is sweat and glorious to die for your country. He say that this is a lie, that you should not believe it. ...read more.

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