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Review of The Catcher In The Rye

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Introduction

Catcher in the Rye This is a review of the book called The Catcher In The Rye. It is by Jonathon .D. Salinger. It is a narration, by a boy called Holden Caulfield, of his teenage life, from when he was expelled from Pencey Grammar to where he is now. He finds out he has been expelled from Pencey but his parents do not know. He has been expelled before from schools and he doesn't want his parents to find out so he runs away and spends a couple of nights in New York, one in a hotel and one in a train station. ...read more.

Middle

He is very good at analysing characters and very often calls people 'phoney' and you actually agree with him. He has a sad moment when he is staying with a teacher, his last means of hope in this world and he is let down by him and this tips him over the edge. The other main character in this is Phoebe, his little sister who Holden loves. The reader starts to love her too as she seems just like the perfect sister. Cute, always happy, clever, and mature. ...read more.

Conclusion

He walks all over New York a night and day, as he usually has nothing to do. The author makes the story constant by making Holden say things a lot like goddam or that kills me. I think that the writer is trying to tell us that a lot of us just ignore the faults of the earth and of life when we should actually do something about them. In general I think that this is a good book but it gets a bit tedious and there are too many of his thoughts and he waffles on too much. In the beginning there is not much action so we think it will be a boring book until something like chapter 4 or 5. ...read more.

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