• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Sunil Mirpuri

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Sunil Mirpuri September 26, 2006 IB English HLII Commentary The Wild Swans at Coole "The Wild Swans at Coole" by W.B. Yeats, portrays the concept of time as the predominant theme through an illustrious comparison to swans. Yeats manages to depict his life sorrow for the time that has passed him by; nevertheless, he does so through a very elaborate yet depressing diction and through incisive images which mend the reader's mind into capturing Yeat's thoughts and emotions. Furthermore, the structure of "The Wild Swans at Coole", although simple and romantic, goes hand-in-hand with the images and the diction in expressing Yeat's depressing and melancholic tone towards his ageing life. Yeats' use of diction throughout "The Wild Swans at Coole" emphasizes his tone of melancholy and nostalgia towards the swans, which are a symbol of time. In the very first stanza of the poem, a description of the narrator's surroundings, the narrator instantly starts using words such as "autumn," "dry," and "still" to establish a dark atmosphere and a depressing tone. Yeats, by starting the poem with the latter, allows the reader to understand the immediate sorrow he is feeling and will feel throughout the poem. ...read more.

Middle

The reader clearly notices that Yeats is comparing his ageing to the marvelous swans which are "still" in time. This can be said as the narrator mentions that it has been nineteen autumns since his return to Coole and the first thing he notices are the graceful swans; which he then praises. Yeat's desire for immortality is also seen in the fourth stanza, "Their hearts have not grown old;/Passion or conquest, wander where they will,/Attend upon them still." Yet again, Yeats portrays the swans as a metaphor for his desire of an unending life. The narrator constantly throws phrases and images towards the reader so that he or she completely acknowledges Yeats depression caused by his desire to be immortal. Moreover, Yeats longing for eternity is expressed in a nostalgic tone when he writes, "Unwearied still, lover by lover,/...Their hearts have not grown old;/Passion or conquest, wander where they will." Other than the desire of being eternal, Yeats seems to be longing freedom, passion, beauty and love; all traits expressed by the swans in the poem. The swans inhabit a free world; they are sexual beings of expression. The reader can clearly notice that Yeats is not only longing for immorality, he is also nostalgic for the wildness each swan carries within. ...read more.

Conclusion

This structural device gives a perfect close to Yeats' "The Wild Swans at Coole" as it leaves the reader and narrator pondering over the depression of the poem. "The Wild Swans at Coole" embodies a great metaphor within itself which perfectly manages to portray Yeats' ideas and emotions towards the eternal. The stylistic devices used through Yeats' masterpiece obligate the reader to feel a strong sensation of depression and melancholy. The entire poem serves as a metaphor which uses the swan as its premise in order to express Yeats' emotions. Nonetheless, it is through the poem's diction, imagery and structure that W.B. Yeats is able to reveal his utmost yearning in life: to be motionless in time, eternal forever. Outline Thesis: Furthermore, the structure of "The Wild Swans at Coole", although simple and romantic, goes hand-in-hand with the images and the diction in expressing Yeat's depressing and melancholic tone towards his ageing life. Diction * Yeats' use of diction throughout "The Wild Swans at Coole" emphasizes his tone of melancholy and nostalgia towards the swans, which are a symbol of time. * "autumn," "dry," and "still" o dark atmosphere and depressing tone * motif - "Still" & "autumn" o "Unwearied still, lover by lover,/They paddle in the cold." o "But now they drift on the still water,/Mysterious, beautiful. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level W.B. Yeats section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level W.B. Yeats essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Commentary on 'The Wild Swans at Coole' by W.B. Yeats

    3 star(s)

    from the beginning with the strongest symbol of the swan, resonating throughout the whole of the poem, also being first introduced in this stanza. This use of physical and elementary images is a contrast to the spiritualistic image of the swan, which can be interpreted as symbolic of something eternal and enduring.

  2. Examine three poems by Auden and Yeats and compare how they present the struggle ...

    of their lives by alluding to their skill as writers and educators. By focusing on their daily life, rather than their political involvement, Yeats suggests the humanity of Ireland's heroes and indicates that common citizens have the ability to effect a change in society if they rebel against obedient conformity and "ignorant good-will".

  1. Commentary: The Scholars by W.B. Yeats.

    He also spent most of his time writing love poems for Lesbia, the woman he was in love with. In the early 18th century, Catullus was translated as a very extravagant and artificially poetic poet. However, as time progressed, scholars and translators shifted away from this, and began translating Catullus

  2. Language and Literature Assignment. Analyse 'The Stolen Child' By W.B Yeats.

    This is but one way in which sound can be seen to have an effect beyond that of the meaning. The pace of these words echo the pace of thought, hence our understanding of this thought is strengthened. Rhythm is also used by Yeats to build up the faeries persuasive argument until it reaches a rhythmic climax in each refrain.

  1. Analysis of Leda and the Swan. Greek mythology.

    could refer to not only Troy, as mentioned above, but also to male genitalia. Yeats draws the poem to a conclusion by posing a question to the reader - could Leda have known of the consequences of the rape? The last stanza begins by referring to, depending on how one

  2. How effective is W.B Yeats in cautioning the modern reader on the melancholic, the ...

    The poem also uses a lot of repetition to show the author's optimistic tone toward the change. However, I feel that the concepts in the poem are too abstract and have not been explained explicitly and haven't been brought out very realistically.

  1. The theme of aging in Yeats' poems Among School Children and Wild Swans at ...

    the most frightening of life's dilemmas when accompanied with an unfulfilled life. For Yeats aging was both undignified and morbid process. In one the most poignant stanzas of Among School Children, stanza V, the speaker wonders about a mother observing her son.

  2. Focusing on Wild Swans at Coole, discuss the theme of time and change in ...

    The final two lines of each stanza rhyme, giving a strong finish. Appropriately for its pensive tone, the lines have a falling rhythm; mostly trochaic with frequent dactyls. As is often the case with Yeats, he is very free in the distribution of his unstressed syllables.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work