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The History of English Language.

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Introduction

The History of English Language The graphology that the wall display would be displayed in would be as follows: * Timeline * Map of the World and Countries * And text bubbles expanding from the above suggestions. The display would include the timeline starting from 1700BC to 1900. It would include the following information which would be included in the text bubbles. Only the dates in red will be part of the timeline diagram. In 1700BC the first known alphabet was discovered in Palestine and in 1000BC the Phoenicians modelled their own alphabet on the Palestinian model. Shortly after this the Greeks modelled their alphabet on the Phoenician model. As a trend forms the Etruscans modelled their alphabet on the Greek model in 800BC, and similarly the Latin alphabet was modelled on the Etruscan model. In 55BC the Romans came to Britain to rule the Celts who already lived in Britain. This then started a craze many, many, many years later, in fact 504 years later, as in 449AD the Angles, Saxons and Jutes began to migrate from Europe (I would then have this drawn on the map by the timeline showing where from and where to). ...read more.

Middle

Before this change the pronoun he could mean either he or they depending on how they were used in a sentence. Then in 1066AD William the Conqueror led the Normans from France and these although they were descendants of the Vikings did not continue their native language Norse and started speaking French. When he conquered England he took root and made a French aristocracy, that's government and important people. It was the Norman invasion that made the change from old English to Middle English. In 1150AD Middle English started to emerge. It soon became the language of politics and court. The main impact was Middle English Spelling. The sound systems which is called Phonology, of the words and spellings had changed dramatically but the actual spelling of the words themselves had not changed since the Anglo-Saxon times. The French then updated the sounds and introduced a letter c to describe the sounds king, cow, and chime, just as they were in old English, but this gave us the letter c that we still use in the modern alphabet today. Byson in 1990 found that the English language gained around 10,000 new words in this era of which three quarters are still used today. ...read more.

Conclusion

Vase Tomato Ticket Explore Invite ` Many other words were borrowed from other places around the world many of these were to do with food eg as above vegetable In 1601 the first dictionary was produced by Richard Cawdrey, called a Table Alphabeticall. In 1755 Dr Johnsons Dictionary was published and this made spelling largely standardised. In 1779 Robert Lowth and Lindley Murray published their grammar books telling people how to speak correctly. In 1828 Noah Webster brought out his own dictionary. This dictionary was very different because it was the American dictionary of English. this special dictionary was published for the one reason to make English and American English different. To do this he changed the spellings of words. For example, color, labor, theatre. 1879 saw the start of one of the most popular dictionaries today the New English Dictionary, now called the OED or Oxford English Dictionary written by James A H Murray. This showed how to correctly spell words and had historical notes to go along with the entry. English then developed as spellings were no longer phonetically spelt. A huge technological change prompted another gathering of lexis in the1900's. For example flight was a huge impact on new lexis. Words arrived with technology. ...read more.

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