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The poem I am writing about are '' The Charge Of The Light Brigade'' by Tennyson and'' Dulce ET Decorum Est.'' by Wilfred Owen.

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Introduction

The charge of the light brigade VS Dulce ET Decorum Est The poem I am writing about are '' The Charge Of The Light Brigade'' by Tennyson and'' Dulce ET Decorum Est.'' by Wilfred Owen. The charge of light brigade was written to honour soldiers in a battle in the Crimean war in the nineteenth century. 'Dulce ET Decorum Est.' was written in the 1914-1918 war to show the public the brutality and the irony of going to war. In the charge of the light brigade; the poem is visual and effective. Tennyson does not describe the scene, nor does he describe the bloodshed and gore of the battlefield. Although the poem was written before television was discovered it portrays the battle as it would have been shown on film. Tennyson has imagined himself there as an observer and he wanted us as a reader to go through the same sympathetic journey and enjoy the glamorous poem. The poem was written about six hundred brave soldiers who fought and died for their country. Tennyson describes the soldiers as heroes, he does not describe personal effect on the soldiers; he concentrates on the whole event. ...read more.

Middle

In ''Dulce ET Decorum Est'' Wilfred uses the word "We"; which shows that he was in the war. We know that he has experienced the war; he knows the agony and the irony of being in the war. He uses word such as: Lame, blind, deaf, fatigue this such word are hideous. In the second stanza Owen is describing a gas attack on the soldiers as they are trudging back to camp. Owen describes the soldiers fumbling to get their mask fastened, all but one, a lone soldier. He is struggling to get his mask on but doesn't get it fastened quick enough and suffers from the full effects of deadly gas: "Gas! Gas! Quick boys!-An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime... Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light, As under a green sea, I saw him drowning." The way Owen describes a comrade watching as a lone soldier is struggling to get his mask fastened awakens the minds of the readers to see the psychological effect that this had on the soldiers. ...read more.

Conclusion

"In all my dreams before my helpless sight He plunges at me, guttering, chocking, drowning." Owen is describing how he personally felt when he saw a soldier suffering infront of him and there was nothing he could do to help him other than watch, while tennyson is describing " rode the six hundred", "Forward the light brigade!" how brave and bold the soldier were, they rode into the light brigade knowingley the riding to their death. "honour the light brigade, honour the charge they made, noble six hundred" tennyson ends his poem in the final stanza by honouring the soldier and telling how noble they were. He is telling us to honour the soldier to hounour the light brigade. "Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- My friend, you would not tell with such high zest, To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori."" Its good and fitting to die for your nation. Owen ends the poem by telling us that its not an honour to die for your nation by saying the old lie: dulce et decorum est. Name:Hamza Teacher: Mrs Bilgehan 1 ...read more.

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