• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Wood-Pile By Robert Frost.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Michelle Glorsky September 19, 2002 Pages 1865-1866 The Wood-Pile By Robert Frost The most obvious and blatant image in the poem is, of course, nature. The poem contains the wood pile itself, a swamp, winter scenery (snow), and birds as well as the narrator's fascination with communicating with such creatures. The narrator in this poem (as well as in the other assigned poems) appears to be exploring nature, people, etc., and doesn't seem to have a clear background, identity, and is certainly not limited in points of view. This poem (as well as the others) appears to be able to take on several different meaning, like a poetic chameleon. ...read more.

Middle

The narrator continues on, contemplating who might have left the wood there "And leave it there far from a useful fireplace..." (line 38). The poem is as ambiguous as my simplified summary. At first we come in contact with the narrator who goes out for a walk - is he escaping something, fleeing, or is he looking for something? He, during this walk, decides to turn back, and the reader questions if the narrator is returning to something, going "back" to something. He decides to continue on and "see," but the reader questions what the narrator means by that statement. Is the narrator looking to see something, as in see what happens, or see where the path leads him, or maybe see if this walk changes his life in some way? ...read more.

Conclusion

Frost states, "Who was so foolish as to think what he thought." (line 12). The main question is who is "he" - the bird for finding harm in the narrator, or the narrator for trying to figure out the bird's thoughts. It, at first glance, appears to be that the narrator is mocking the bird for being paranoid as "...one who takes/Everything said as personal to himself." (lines 15-16). However, the narrator's description of the white feather may be a hint that the bird is not paranoid, and in fact has something to fear. This description is a betrayal to the narrator's claim of indifference to the bird. I suppose there is no way to be certain of the narrator's meaning, except to determine which speculation is most reliable and sensible. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Robert Frost section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Robert Frost essays

  1. Closely analyse the poems 'Sacifice' by Taufiq Rafat and 'Out, Out' by Robert Frost. ...

    Now I will describe some of the differences between the two poems. The main difference would have to be that 'Out, Out' is about a human where as 'Sacrifice' is about an animal. They both describe different cultures. For example 'Sacrifice' is a religious community and 'Out, Out' isn't.

  2. Write a critical appreciation of Robert Frost's 'The Wood Pile', noting to what extent ...

    Eventually, when the bird went behind the woodpile to "make its last stand", the narrator himself gives a glimpse of how intricately he and the bird are connected in the line "the way I might have gone". The woodpile itself is described in good detail, "a cord of maple, cut and split/And piled-and measured, four by four by eight".

  1. The Relationship Between Man and Nature in the poems of Robert Frost and R.S. ...

    Lord Tennyson has used a metaphor there, like Mr. Frost does. "...The silent isle embowers..." compared to "...it whispered..." Very alike, although I know that Lord Tennyson was before Mr. Frost. Mending Wall - Robert Frost. This poem is about two neighbours mending a wall.

  2. Free essay

    Fros's peorty is more about people than nature. Discuss

    The horse acts a reminder that it is time to move on, in that the horse is becoming impatient and wants to continue with its journey. "My little horse must think it queer to stop without a farmhouse near". The horse here can be seen as metaphor for the narrators'

  1. Compare and contrast 2 or more anthologies. Consider the principles and preferences which ...

    The poem is written in the first person, this effectively shows the parents feelings. The words 'could not leave' (line 4) shows that that he/she is drawn to their child and their sleep is something so precious, nobody can enter.

  2. Analyse The Woodpile and compare the language and themes to other Frosts poems.

    To show the reader that this concrete image is the most important in this poem, Frost describes it precisely, "and measured four by four by eight". This Woodpile lets Frost make his point that people get tired of the things they do and consequently forget about them, the reader can

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work