• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What is the difference between malignant and benign tumours and how are they treated?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What is the difference between malignant and benign tumours and how are they treated? To start with let us look at the definitions of the words: Malignant: in mod. use applied to carcinoma and sarcoma, forming a class 'characterized by their rapidity of growth, by the extension to the lymphatic glands, and by their recurrence in situ and in distant organs after removal' Of diseases: Of a mild type; not malignant. 1 In a human cancer the progression goes like this. There is the normal mucosa. This is the state that of a healthy cell. That then becomes a precursor lesion. This is a benign tumour, normally unnoticeable and of no affect to the patient. ...read more.

Middle

Adeno or Squamus tumours have a glandular component. However all types of malignant tumours spread. There are four basic types of metastases. Local growth is where the cancer has direct involvement into surrounding tissue. Cancers can spread to completely different and random areas of the body by implantation. This is where metastases (little seedlings of cancer cells) are deposited in the lymph nodes or blood stream. These then travel around the system and get deposited randomly. Once a tumour reaches a certain size the blood vessels that normally service the mucosa are inadequate and the tumour goes into angiogenesis. This is where the tumour develops a blood supply of its own. ...read more.

Conclusion

In addition the palliative care team will make sure that the patient can carry on with a normal life if possible, with the aim of keeping the patient at home, or in friendly surroundings as soon as possible. There is another method of treatment that is being researched at the moment, although presently it is not very well understood even by the leading scientists. This is RNA interference. The theory is that if the cell can stop the genes that code for cancer (such as BRCA -1 the main breast cancer gene) functioning then the symptoms will never present effectively curing the patient. This would also work for viruses such as HIV foot and mouth or HPVs which are thought to lead directly to cervical cancer. 1 Oxford English dictionary (2nd ed.) Richard Rees Page 1 01/05/2007 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Healthcare section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work