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Australia does not follow a “tradition of impulsive involvement in international conflict regardless of the nation’s state of preparedness”.

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Introduction

My hypothesis is that Australia does not follow a "tradition of impulsive involvement in international conflict regardless of the nation's state of preparedness". Australia had extremely close ties with Britain and felt a duty to the "mother land" which it fulfilled twice following the out break of two major conflicts. It was bound by foreign policy to enter WW1and WW2 and to fight to defend the empire. In our next major conflict, Vietnam, Australia gave support to America due to our eagerness for them to stop the spread of communism. In all involvements Australia's military earnt a fine reputation, and until Vietnam, enjoyed considerable support from home. Australia's military manpower at the time was not strong, but when WW1 began people rushed to enlist and go on an adventure. It has been recorded that Australia prepared for only six weeks for the expected outbreak of WW1, however this is not true. Australia began planning and preparing for the out break of war (expected to start in 1915), in June 1911, after a conference in London. The Australian Prime Minister, Andrew Fisher, gave an assurance that an Australian expeditionary force would be ready to fight with Britain in the opening battles of the war. ...read more.

Middle

Australia was badly prepared for the out break of another world war. It is for this reason that the Australian government of the day increased the defence budget by 62.5 million pounds ($128 million), a huge amount at the time. The RAAF, (Royal Australian Air Force), suffered much the same problem. They were equipped with old planes from WW1, and badly needed new, more advanced planes. On a brighter note the RAN, (Royal Australian Navy), was well funded and outfitted. The militia forces, men who joined and went straight to the front were under trained and under equipped. The Australian regular infantry were well trained, and consequently had many victories over Italy and Japan. Capturing 1,000's of useable weapons and vehicles along with taking 100,000's of prisoners. Leading into WW1 and right through to the start of WW2 Australia did not have a foreign policy distinct from that of the imperial government in London. Basically Australia's foreign policy was the same as Britain's. Our foreign policy was composed mostly in London under British supervision. Australia also did most of our military exercises and operations with Britain. When the Labour Party came to power in the 1940's, Australia's foreign policy was changed. ...read more.

Conclusion

and a deep hatred of Germany developed. They wanted to fight and, although physical standards were very high, over 50 000 men enlisted very quickly - some coming hundreds of miles, walking or riding. When the conscription vote was taken the citizens voted no. The realisation that it was not a game or an adventure and people were killed, changed the public's attitude to war. Yet many men still enlisted to fight for their country and the "mother land". At the start of WW2 the people agreed that they should fight to help Britain and stop Germany for the second time. Much support was given to the war effort and many of the local merchant ships were converted to help transport troops to and from battle. As the war progressed more and more support was given - after hearing about the victories over Italy, Germany and eventually Japan. The nation was ready for the conflicts in Europe and with Japan. Each time the Australian's fought valiantly and were labelled heroes. In Australia the people gave support and did a fine job in producing all the equipment and necessities needed for the war effort and consequently our nation played a significant role in the Allied war effort in every conflict they took part in. ...read more.

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