• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How important was technological innovation compared with other factors in producing allied victory in the Crimean war?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How important was technological innovation compared with other factors in producing allied victory in the Crimean war? To answer this question fully we have to look at all the factors concerned and then ascertain the effect each had on the outcome of the war. To make this easier I have categorised the factors in to leadership and organisation, battlefield tactics, strategy and technology. The allied leadership in the Crimean war was weak and held surprisingly little commanding power over many aspects of the war. Lord Raglan, an old, inexperienced and cautious man, was the commander of the British troops. He had only acquired the position on grounds of seniority and was not the strongest of commanders. Added to the fact that Raglan was a fairly weak commander was the astonishingly low level of control he had over the war effort as a whole: the artillery, transport and naval aspects of the war all being under the control of other commanders. Raglan's weak and over cautious leadership did cause problems in the war, as often Raglan took too long to make decisions, giving the Russians time to fortify positions and regroup troops. A prime example of this cautiousness is the situation after the battle of Alma, where the allied troops waited too long to follow on the attack to Sebastopol, giving the Russians time to prepare for an assault. ...read more.

Middle

Another tactical advantage the British had in the Crimean war was the level of training of its troops. They were seasoned professionals who had been disciplined and trained to the highest level, this meant that they were much more efficient on the battlefield, using their weapons well and rarely if ever, backing down and fleeing. At the battle of Alma a ludicrously thin line of the Highland Brigade was faced by hordes of Russian, superbly disciplined the Highland Brigade advanced firing; at the time an extremely difficult manoeuvre, this was too much for the Russian troops who were forced to retreat. The heroic failure of the charge of the Light brigade also serves to show just how disciplined and committed the British soldiers were, willing to charge in to an almost certain death if ordered to. The use of effective battlefield tactics that utilised the technological advances of the time in the appropriate manner was a fairly important factor in the eventual victory of the allies, since it often gave them the upper hand in close battles. However it is important to remember that these tactics relied on the technological advantages that the allies had over the relatively primitive weapon systems of the Russian army. ...read more.

Conclusion

All these new features of the weapons, combined with the aforementioned expertise of the soldiers handling them, meant that the allied troops had a huge advantage over the Russians on every battlefield in the Crimea. At Balaclava for example the 93rd highlanders were deployed only in a 'thin red line' but they still managed to defeat a Russian cavalry attack with their superior firepower. This demonstrated that the infantrymen now were so well armed that they could defeat a head on cavalry attack, once the strongest form of assault. Other technological improvements such as the telegraph were being used, which meant that communication was much quicker, allowing better organisation and positioning of troops. However the Enfield rifle was the most significant technological advancement and had the biggest effect on the outcome of the Crimean war. In conclusion it seems that the advance in weaponry was the most significant factor in the allied victory of the Crimean war. However we need to acknowledge that battlefield tactics were almost equally important: without the high quality of troops and the tactics to use these weapons effectively the British may not have had such an advantage over the enemy on the field of battle. With such sophisticated weaponry being put to such skilled use it was very difficult for the Russians to get the upper hand in battle ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. The great Patriotic war - From incompetence to victory.

    The answer can be found in a statement by Lord Halifax after a meeting with Hitler at Obersalzberg in 1937: " I and other members of the British government fully realize that the Fuhrer has achieved much not only for Germany itself but, as the result of having destroyed communism

  2. How important was the war at sea

    There were some people who had killed many enemies and were made heroes. 1- MANFRED VON RICHTOFEN: (The Red Baron) shot down 80 enemy planes. 2- RENE FONCK: shot down 75 enemy planes. 3- ALBERT BALL: Shot down 43 enemy planes.

  1. How important was Stalins Leadership in relation to other factors, in accounting for the ...

    provided the USSR with essential war supplies - $11.3 billion worth of goods were sent throughout the war. Without these the army would have been less effectively supplied and progress may have been slower, particularly one the offensive move towards Berlin, which may have given the enemy more time to re-organise and build defenses.

  2. What factors have prompted democratisation in Argentina?

    He did this by having his Interior Minister, General Albano Eduardo Harguindeguy meet with senior members of the UCR7, the Radical party, as well as relatively minor members of the PJ8, the Per´┐Żnists. The problem was that the military leaders were concerned with the issue of presidential succession, and this division caused the talks to become less and less relevant.

  1. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    Throughout the war Zahle suffered many sieges and attacks by leftist and Palestinian forces but its people always managed to hold out, fighting alongside the small contingent of Lebanese Front militia that were based there. The location of Zahle made it of such importance that the Syrians felt they had

  2. Was the Battle of the Somme the Most Significant Factor in Leading to the ...

    They had to concede defeat. The Somme was instrumental in this chain of events that led to the German defeat. A crucial point in the war on the Western Front after the Somme is that the German and British armies had greatly changed during the course of the Somme.

  1. Battle Analysis - Dong Ap Bia (Hamburger Hill).

    has the advantage in availability of supplies and transportation. Much of the command that took place during the beginning of the battle was lead by Lieutenant Colonel Honeycutt, commander of the 3d battalion, 187th Infantry. Battle command was decidedly decentralized.

  2. Was it the technological or tactical changes which had the greater influence in determining ...

    Medieval armies also lacked anything like a comprehensive command structure able to evoke general, conditioned responses. Coherence depended on mutual loyalties far more than on discipline, drill, or fear of punishment. However all this was due to change influenced by a growing awareness that armoured horsemen were not in fact invulnerable.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work