• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Use your own knowledge to assess how far the sources support the interpretation that the decision to implement the Final Solution arose mainly from a long-standing and widespread hatred of the Jews.

Extracts from this document...


b.) Use your own knowledge to assess how far the sources support the interpretation that the decision to implement the Final Solution arose mainly from a long-standing and widespread hatred of the Jews. During the Nazi Party's reign of Germany from 1933-1945, it is estimated that around 6 million Jews were slaughtered to death, whilst in Nazi concentration and extermination camps, during WWII. These Nazi 'forced labour' camps were set up all over the newly formed Weimar Republic, such as Auschwitz and Dachau, with their main function - genocide. The Nazi German policy to 'exterminate the European Jews' was shown through out the Holocaust, especially in the 'Final Solution' stage, which Hitler labelled as "the final solution of the Jewish question". From the beginning of the Nazi reign of Germany, Adolf Hitler set about implementing laws that could ban Jews from doing specific things. By 1st April 1933, Jewish doctors, shops, lawyers and stores were to be boycotted. Not only this, but 6 days later, Hitler began to unravel his plan to Germany by producing a new law which banned Jews from being employed in government. ...read more.


Source C is a brief insight into what it was like to be in a family in Nazi Germany that had been separated by political views. Bernt Engelmann recalls how he spoke of the 'unspeakable crudeness and cowardice' of the Nazi's, whereas his cousin, Klaus-G�nther objected by stating 'you have to accept the idea of political necessity'. This is in comparison with source A which suggested that there were conflicting, political views through out the German population. Not only this, but it also identifies with source B and the Nazi propaganda. It can be established that the cousin, Klaus- G�nther, has been influenced by Nazi propaganda, such as Hitler Youth and Nazi literature. He details his feelings towards the Jews by labelling them 'parasites'. This again suggests that there was much widespread hatred of Jews, which of course could have helped make the decision to implement the Final Solution. The 'future SS General' Klaus, also argued that the violence at Kristallnacht was much better than a 'hundred years of struggle'. However, clearly the Nazi propaganda had lead people to believe that the new Aryan race was superior to the Jews, and that they should make them pay and put the money towards 'our defences in the West'. ...read more.


Alan Farmer, also attempts to suggest that due to the fact the invasion of the USSR was not going to plan, Hitler was forced to 'initiate extermination out of desperation'. Therefore, he began to kill all Russian Jews, 'which lead him to decide to kill all Jews'. This idea conflicts with the majority of the other sources, which have relied on the mass amount of propaganda that was issued during the time, and that many of the authors of the sources were recalling sections of time from the period, whereas Source E is written by a 'modern historian'. Although, it is fair to suggest that Alan Farmer may have had more information at his disposal and has also had more time to analyse the period. In conclusion, it does seem as though the large majority of the sources available agreed that there was a widespread hatred of the Jews throughout Germany, caused by the Nazi influence, and this did lead to Hitler implementing the Final Solution. I feel as though Nazi propaganda and other schemes such as Nazi-education, lead to a very convinced nation. I also believe Source B was a good example of how a child could be so easily 'brainwashed' into believing the 'Jews were the enemy', through Hitler Youth and Nazi Education. Bill Stephens ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Assess the view that the Holocaust was mainly a result of a long term ...

    Rather than focusing solely on public opinion, which whilst relevant, was limited in its capacity to actually effect the Holocaust decision, Passage D insists upon the overall clarity of the message which meant Hitler's ideas could be acted upon. Kershaw, who has described Hitler's status as "the embodiment of the

  2. How far do you agree Communist ideology influenced Stalin's decision to implement Collectivisation in ...

    When implementing Collectivisation Stalin had very little idea about what it actually was or how to go about it, but the basic reasoning was its Communist grounding and this may have been the most important reason to begin with its implementation.

  1. Causes of show trials + purges of 1930s.

    to work in an awful job in a place like Siberia or Kazakhstan, which required no intelligence because Stalin was scared that you might start an organization or a group against him. If you were able to work but did not want to work then you would be condemened as a social parasite.

  2. The Holocaust

    Victims included Jews, gypsies, Soviet State Officials and the physically and mentally disabled. The killings were brutal, victims were made to dig their own graves, hand over their valuables, stripped and then shot in front of the trench they had dug.

  1. How far was the holocaust a long term plan of nazi racial policy?

    " The Fuhrer's prophecy is coming true in the most terrible way"7, suggests that Hitler's will was taken by the Hitler's followers and then turned into coherent policy. In order for the holocaust to have occurred someone must have initially listened to Hitler's speech, concocted a plan of action and

  2. The Holocaust was the result of Hitlers long held grand design to pursue a ...

    The image depicts the burning of the talmond following a public debate between a Christian priest and a leader of the Jewish community. The debate was meant to "prove" the correctness of the Christian faith. At the conclusion of the debate, Jews were killed or subjected to mass conversion, or Jewish books such as the Talmud were burned.

  1. 'The First World War arose primarily as a result of German aggression.' How far ...

    Belgian neutrality had been guaranteed since the 1837 Treaty of London, therefore, it seems possible that Germany felt ?grand? enough (Source 2) to invade neutral Belgium in order to secure a victory over the French. This annexation reflects aggression from Germany and the key role it played in starting war.

  2. "The Wannsee Conference was entirely responsible for the Holocaust" How valid is this assessment ...

    The German diplomat died of his wounds on 9th November 1938. Grynszpan's action was immediately denounced by the Nazi propaganda machine as a ?declaration of war? and part of the world-wide Judaeo-Masonic conspiracy. It would unleash an unprecedented orgy of ferocious anti-Jewish violence and terror across Germany.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work