• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Was the Battleof Britain a turning point in the defeat of German in World War Two?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Was the Battle of Britain a turning point in the defeat of German in World War Two? By June 1940, Hitler had conquered six of the European Nations. Hitler offered to make peace with Britain, after deciding that he believed Britain to be in no state to fight. At the time, Britain's Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, rejected the peace offering, refusing to make any deals with Germany. This created a problem for Hitler, as his main aim was to defeat the USSR and create an empire in the East. He felt no need to be at war with Britain too. Britain prepared to fight alone against Germany, and the Battle of Britain began on the 1st of July, when German aircraft crossed the channel, and began to put their plans to destruct the RAF, into action. The Battle of Britain was an air battle, lasting through the summer of 1940. German bombers set out to attack targets in Britain, and the British planes were sent to intercept incoming Germans. Both Britain and Germany started with weaknesses. Germany had previously used Blitzkrieg tactics (lightning tactics using up-to-date technology ad military tactics. Reinforcements would then capture territory.) Britain was fighting alone, and if they lost, the USA would be vulnerable to attack. The Battle of Britain ended as the Blitz began, when in September 1940, the German Luftwaffe changed tactics, and bombed London. This essay is going to explore the factors which determine whether the Battle of Britain was a turning point in the war, or not. One of the factors which needs to be considered is that the Battle of Britain was Hitler's first real defeat. ...read more.

Middle

Germany was unable to cope with the length of the Battle of Britain, as their tactics were not good enough for a long war, and they had to stretch their resources. This effectively led to the victory for Britain. One other contributing factor which could also provide evidence that the Battle of Britain was a turning point in the war was the fact that the USA would be vulnerable if Britain had lost. Before the Battle of Britain, the USA was concentrating on a war with Japan. The USA didn't actually enter the war until 1941, as President Roosevelt did not want a war with Germany. He knew that the Americans would not support a war, but it seemed inevitable. The USA helped Britain by sending supplies previously, and if they were to enter the war, it was obvious that they would join Britain. In 1936, Japan signed a pact with Germany, and afterwards, on the 8th December, USA declared war on Japan. On the 11th of December, Hitler declared war on the USA. If the Battle of Britain had not been a success for Britain, Britain would have been occupied by Germany, who could have then used it as a base for attacks on the USA. Also, if Britain had lost, the USA would be fighting alone, as the Germans had a pact with Japan. Without the victory for the Battle of Britain, the Allies may well have lost World War Two, as the USA would be vulnerable to attack, and Germany would occupy most of Europe, and Britain included. Another factor which helps determine whether the Battle of Britain was a turning point in the war is the fact that Britain improved their tactics. ...read more.

Conclusion

If the Battle of Britain had not been a success, there still would have been a counter attack on the Germans with millions of troops. In conclusion, it is clear that the Battle of Britain was a turning point in the war. There is much evidence to suggest this, as many achievements were made following the Battle of Britain, which effectively led to the success of World War Two. There is much significant change from the beginning of the Battle of Britain, and afterwards. Before the Battle of Britain, Britain was not in the lead, and the war seemed to be going in Germany's favour. Britain made many significant achievements, including development of weaponry and superior tactics. If the Battle of Britain had not been a success, Germany may well have won it, and gone on to win the war as winning the battle meant that Germany had suffered their first defeat. Their morale became low and they were not equipped for further stages in the war. The success was significant also because if Britain had been defeated, the USA would be vulnerable, and World War Two may also have been a victory for Germany. Although there are a few factors which show that the War could have been won without the Battle of Britain, there are more significant factors that suggest the Battle of Britain was vital. Also, the factors which suggest the Battle of Britain was not a turning point, are not as significant and it is not certain whether the war would have been in Germany's favour if the Battle of Britain had not occurred. After looking at the evidence, it is clear that the Battle of Britain was a turning point in the war and without it, Britain may well have gone on to lose World War Two. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. How far do you think Bloody Sunday was a turning point in the course ...

    the kind of political advice they were getting from the Unionist run government at Stormont. Westminster decided that it must have full control over law and order but Stormont resisted. As a result many people opposed this and Hennessy argues that the abolition of Stormont created a wave of alarm throughout the Unionist Community.

  2. An Investigation Into the Way in Which Sir Winston Churchill Used Rhetoric During the ...

    and applauds the efforts of both the British and the Americans to establish Basic English, an international language composed of "about 650 nouns and 200 verbs or other parts of speech." He continues to propound the theme of union between the two peoples.

  1. Considering the changes in warfare 1845-1991 how far can Blitzkrieg be considered a turning ...

    as the Panzer IV, this was credited to the ideas of Heinz Guderian who specified the importance of mechanised and mobile forces in modern warfare. "The officers and men in many cases come to consider the approach of tanks a sufficient explanation for not fighting.

  2. Reasons for the increasing support given to NSDAP by the German people in the ...

    The industrialists who were sceptical of the NSDAP's pro-socialist wing became somewhat convinced of the party's anti-communists stand after 1929 when NSDAP joined the anti-young coalition. However support from industrialists was rare as with the unemployed who tended to vote for the KPD.

  1. Explain the importance of the Battle of Britain as a turning point of the ...

    Britain proved that it would not waste USA's resources or money. Also, the USA's navy helped to protect British merchant ships from German U-boats in the Atlantic. However, it was the Japanese bombing of the Pearl Harbour which brought USA into the war.

  2. Why And How Did Britain Survive The War From 1940-1943

    330,000 men were rescued in just nine days and the heroism of these seamen helped in the survival of Britain. Although the new Prime Minster, Winston Churchill, put a brave face on things by saying "The tale of the Dunkirk beaches will shine in whatever records are preserved of our

  1. Why was Britain able to win the Battle of Britain

    Britain had made one mistake that can be seen as a positive point that, was that Britain had overestimated the power, strength and competence of Germany. Britain prepared so well that Germany was not able to stand a chance. The Germans were also a reason why we won and why they lost.

  2. The Battle of Britain as a turning point in the Second World War.In the ...

    There are no Bridges over the sea. On land I am a hero, on sea I am a coward". The plan was never to be revived. In 1944 Britain's defences against sea-borne attack were scaled down. By that date it was finally certain that the German army, which had been slaughtered in Russia, could not actually invade Britain any more.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work