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Which Country Was Most To Blame for WWII - Italy, Germany or Japan?

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Introduction

Which Country Was Most To Blame for WWII - Italy, Germany or Japan? World War II began on the 3rd September when Britain and France declared war on Germany after they had invaded Poland. Ever since the end of WWI Europe had been divided into different camps. The ideas of peace during the 1920s and 30s had been designed to eliminate the gaps between the camps. Unfortunately, this never worked and so Europe was still divided into two main camps when war was declared. Britain and France in Western Europe were the leaders of one camp. And they faced the other European powers, which consisted of Germany and Italy in the other camp. There were also many smaller countries in both camps including Croatia, Bulgaria and Slovakia all members of the Anti-Comintern Pact and therefore included with the Axis Powers. The main members and founders of the Anti-Comintern Pact, Germany, Italy and Japan were all seen as the 'bad guys' because of their aggressive foreign policies. All three countries' foreign policies involved attacking other countries for resources or land and this is why they were separated from other European countries and branded 'aggressive'. Italy was the first country to pursue their aggressive ways in Europe when Mussolini turned them into a Fascist country in 1922. ...read more.

Middle

This didn't really bother Hitler either, because he still invaded Poland on 1st September 1939, and he knew that he could only get away with so much and that eventually he would have to go to war. The other main power in the Anti-Comintern Pact was Japan. Whilst Japan weren't involved in the European part of the war because they were so far away, they certainly contributed to the war, and it was because of Japan's attacks on the USA that it became a global war. In WWI, Japan fought on the side of the Allies and the Versailles Peace settlement gave Japan former German colonies from the Pacific and German rights in Shantung. Japanese relations with America got off to a bad start because America didn't like Japanese retention of Shantung. However, they did get better when Japan took part in the Washington Naval Conference and agreed the ratio of 5:5:3 between the American, British and Japanese fleets. Japan still had lots of domestic problems, which were made worse by the depression in 1939. Their main problem was a lack of raw materials because they had to import everything from abroad. In 1931, the Japanese army decided to invade Manchuria to try and solve this problem. Unfortunately, all they managed to do was push themselves further away from Britain and American, and closer to war with China. ...read more.

Conclusion

The League of Nations was the only way in which Hitler could have been stopped without going to war, but the opportunity to do so was ignored so many times that going to war became the only option. Overall, I don't believe that anything or anyone is solely to blame for World War II, but all of the countries are equally to blame, because they all did things that caused the war and they all did things that had no effect on the war. I think the League of Nations played a big part in the causes of World War II, firstly because it did nothing to stop Germany and Italy and secondly because none of the member countries paid any attention to it and just did whatever they felt like. I also believe that it's not just Germany, Italy and Japan that are to blame. I think that Britain, France and the USSR could also share some of the blame for doing things or not doing things. For example, Britain allowing Germany to build up her navy to 35% of Britain's. So in conclusion, the blame for WWII can be shared among most of the European powers, as well as the depression, the policy of appeasement and the League of Nations. Phil Scott 10V February 23rd, 2003 Page 1 of 6 ...read more.

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