• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Who Was Mostly To Blame For The Cold War

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Who Was Mostly To Blame For The Cold War? It is unclear exactly when the cold war began but most historians agree it started at the end of the Second World War (1945) and ended in 1991. The cold war was a war between the U.S.S.R and the U.S.A along with its allies. It was also a war between communism and capitalism. In this essay I will be looking at why I think both sides were to blame for the cold war. The U.S.A played a part in starting the cold war. After the war the U.S.A became very wary about Communism and U.S.S.R expansion. The U.S.A was unhappy about soviet troops encamped in Eastern Europe but did not want to start a full scale war with the U.S.S.R. ...read more.

Middle

The U.S.S.R had not been told about these plans to make such a destructive weapon and felt betrayed by their old allies. I think this broke down the trust between the two nations and friction mounted once again. The U.S.S.R was also partly to blame for the cold war. During World War Two the Russians had liberated countless countries in Eastern Europe. But instead of removing their troops at the end of it all they kept their troops encamped in Poland and various other countries in Eastern Europe. Although the U.S.A eventually agreed to letting the Soviets do this they were still displeased with what was going on. The U.S.S.R also decided to implement a communist government in Poland and aided other communist parties trying to take control f their countries. ...read more.

Conclusion

The two sides were also allies during the Second World War but the Soviets were convinced they had not been given the help they needed on several occasions and they hardly worked together hand in hand. This then had all set itself up to contribute to the cold war. Many historians think both sides were to blame. This is because both sides were far too aggressive to one another and their leaders and politicians disliked each other. They both went behind each others backs and frustrated one and one another, lacking the ability to communicate. In conclusion to all the evidence I thought that both sides were to blame for the cold war. They both equally contributed to the conflict and no side was really in the right. However I can see how other people may disagree with me as there were valid points for every side of the argument. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. This graduation paper is about U.S. - Soviet relations in Cold War period. Our ...

    Although well-read in history, Truman's experience in foreign policy was minimal. His most famous comment on diplomacy had been a statement to a reporter in 1941 that "if we see that Germany is winning [the war] we ought to help Russia, and if Russia is winning we ought to help

  2. Who was to blame for the Cold War?

    The other countries knew that Stalin would never agree to Hitler's terms. The basic mistrust that the Soviet Union and the USA had for each other made the breakdown of the wartime alliance inevitable. The second factor of this argument involves the two different political systems that the Soviets and the Democratic West held.

  1. Who is to blame for the Cold War?

    The USSR, Britain and USA as an attempt to sort out the world instead increased tension and with too much tension, a Cold War can develop. The case in the Potsdam conference, which was held after Germany surrendered, was far worse than Yalta.

  2. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    The Mercedes truck used for the bombing was delivered to Beirut from an assembly plant in Syria or Iran, and the explosives used for the bomb were shipped from Bulgaria and delivered via Damascus. The day became the Marine Corps' bloodiest since February of 1945, when Marines fought to secure Iwo Jima.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work