• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did war break out in 1939?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why did war break out in 1939? Hitler came to power in 1933, he thought that the Treaty of Versailles was incredibly unfair toward Germany and sought to do whatever he could to change it. Hitler rose from being an obscure and demoralised member of the defeated German army to the all powerful f�hrer, dictator of Germany, with almost unlimited power and overwhelming ambition to make Germany great once again. Hitler had four main aims; to take complete control of Germany in a dictatorship, to make Germany strong economically and militarily ready for war, to make Germany "racially pure", and to build a new society where every "Aryan" had a place and a role in life. In order to take complete control of Germany and fulfil his ambitions Hitler had to dispose of all his opposition. Hitler had to reverse all the terms set out in the Treaty of Versailles to make Germany what he wanted it to be. In order to make Germany ready for war, Germany's armed forces could no longer be limited, so one of the initial things Hitler did when he came to power was to rearm Germany's armed forces. ...read more.

Middle

The self-interest of members of the League of Nations had caused it to fail in its quest to sustain peace in Europe and had made it totally unsuccessful. In 1936 Hitler began his policy of reclaiming lost German territory. Once again Britain and France took the easy option of appeasement. Appeasement allowed Hitler to do practically anything, including claiming more territory for Germany. Appeasement encouraged Hitler to be aggressive, every time Hitler got away with acts of aggression he became even more certain that Britain and France would do nothing to stop him. If Britain and France had done something in the early stages, when Germany was weakest, they would have stood more of a chance of limiting German ambition, but Germany was annexing more and more land and subsequently becoming stronger and stronger. Hitler was succeeding in fooling world leaders by promising that he wouldn't do anything bad. Because Britain and France did not stand up to Hitler when he invaded Czechoslovakia, Stalin believed that Britain would not help the USSR either if Hitler invaded it. This persuaded Stalin that he should reach an agreement with Germany and, on August 23, 1939, the Nazi-Soviet Pact was signed. ...read more.

Conclusion

If members of the League of Nations were able to agree on what actions they should take then the Manchurian and Abyssinian Crisis would have been solved, showing that the League of Nations could uphold its laws and have influence over the actions of other countries, that the League of Nations shouldn't be disputed. I also believe that appeasement was an enormous mistake. Hitler's confidence in himself grew too strong. So strong in fact that he believed he could do anything and no one would challenge him. If Britain and France, or any other country, had tried to stop him when he first started rearming or when he invaded the Rhineland, World War II could have been avoided. What politicians didn't know when Hitler sent troops into the Rhineland was that they had orders to retreat if they came up against any opposition. If Hitler was stopped in the early stages of his ambitious scheme, when he first started going against the wishes of the League of Nations and the Treaty of Versailles, I doubt that World War II would have happened. ?? ?? ?? ?? Stephanie Case 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Why did the League of Nations fail?

    5 star(s)

    It could be argued that the USA could never have made the League work in the long-term because there would always be a strong public motion against its involvement. Washington's theory of isolationism was deeply ingrained in the average American's psyche.

  2. Was Hitler a weak dictator?

    These had full control over designated areas and executed Hitler's orders. This was a major achievement as the Kaiser didn't achieve to expand his influence on regional areas, there's evidence that shows that actually some people from the agricultural sector didn't even know who or how they were being governed.

  1. Hitlers Germany

    There followed the days of the Fr�uleins, who, whether the official military orders were for or against fraternization, carried on with Allied soldiers in varying degrees of intimacy in return for chocolate bars, nylon stockings, or K rations, to supplement the family food rations.

  2. Why was the league so ineffective in dealing with the Abyssinian Crisis?

    to listen to it as the Italian leader Mussolini was quite prepared to go to war with Abyssinia. The question that the league had to take was what to do with Italy if they took this action. The problem that the league had was that the action they took depended

  1. Evaluate historical comparisons of Hitler and Stalin and their regimes

    the party, the use of terror, the complicity they created but also the opposition they, their economic policies, and finally the war and the death camps."24 Overy's book is a fresh approach to the historical debate as he avoids the term totalitarianism as he feels it was used too liberally to describe dictatorships of the 1930s.

  2. Causes of show trials + purges of 1930s.

    The use of machinery would enable food production to be increased and reduce the labour requirements of agricultural production. This would therefore release much-needed workers for the growing industrial plants. Political Factors Collectivisation would help extend socialism to the countryside.

  1. How far do David Low’s cartoons show the reasons for the failure of the ...

    work in an armament factory but also queues for undertakers and gravestone makers suggesting a possible war in the future and death. Lows last cartoon on disarmament, appendix number 6, is on the failure of the disarmament conference in May 1934.

  2. AS Level Edexcel History Spain 1931-33 Revision Notes

    During WW2 Catalonia and Basque Country boomed economically making textiles materials for both sides of the war. Because the central government threatened heavy taxes on both regions as a result ? this provoked a major call for independence. The end of the Spanish monarchy, 1931.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work